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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Kids that are a problem in class. What do you do? --CAN YOU DO THESE THINGS? -Thanks

Posted by on Oct. 27, 2013 at 12:01 AM
  • 35 Replies

I'm not a teacher, but I am curious. There are several students in my son's class that seem to be in trouble everyday & are a disruption. I know back in the day things were handled differently, but I think things have changed. I know my son's teacher said she counts, but my son has never mentioned that. However, while he was helping out in another question he specifically said he liked that teacher because when the kids are talking she counts backward & the kids stop talking so they can listen. This particular teacher also said she had the same students in her class last year & it wasn't a pleasant year at all. So what are you all allowed to do?

THESE THINGS (back in the day):

1.  You had to move your chair or sit in the back of the class.

2.  You had to turn around & face the wall or stand in the corner.

3.  You were sent to the office continuously if you were a problem.

4.  You had to write a sentence 50 or 100 times.

5.  A note was sent home obviously.

6.  Your parent had to have a meeting with the principal.

7.  If you were really bad then your mom or dad had to come & sit in class with you. 

THANKS!:  Thanks to everyone who responded! I became curious after a meeting with the Principal where I made the comment "Apparently these kids were a problem last year & I don't know how things are handled now, but back in the day when you were a problem you were sent to the office, & if bad enough your parent had to come to school with you. Now I don't know what those other parents are doing for their kids, but I'm willing to be here everyday in class for my son."

Now my son isn't the kid with a behavior problem. He's a great student according to his teacher "he's an excellent student & a role model for other kids." That being said he does have anxiety issues & the misbehaving students are a continuous disruption, & the teacher's response (yelling or raising her voice several times) has become an anxiety issue for him. I was curious how other teachers handle things. This teacher gives the students a check & says she will have the child write a note home about their behavior. I know that for 1 student it's not true because my mom takes care of him & I pick him up. I can immediately tell if his clip was moved & his folder is looked through for homework and such.  Apparently they do lose recess & if it's several students they have to pick up trash or run laps. Either way it's not effective because the same students are getting in trouble almost everyday.

As for those with special needs children or have a child that needs accommodations I understand if there are behavior issues. I'm strictly referring to the ones who don't have issues that have to be handled a certain way. :)

by on Oct. 27, 2013 at 12:01 AM
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Replies (1-10):
mjande4
by Platinum Member on Oct. 27, 2013 at 12:04 AM

I don't start teaching until all eyes are on me and mouths are closed. Granted, I teach older kids, but I just wait patiently and it never takes long, if at all. If i do, on the rare occasion, have an attention seeker, then I just send them to the hallway until I finish presenting.

frndlyfn
by Gold Member on Oct. 27, 2013 at 12:13 AM

Our teachers use a certain saying that the students need to repeat back to them before they start their lessons or start saying something of importance.  I have heard that a few teachers will transfer those trouble students out of their class to another teacher to try to rein them in.

mom22tumblebugs
by Gold Member on Oct. 27, 2013 at 12:21 AM

My daughters teachers use a clip chart. They start on "ready to learn" and based on their behavior during the day they either move their clip up or down. Up and they can earn a class buck, which they can trade in for an incentive later.

mommy2cristian
by Bronze Member on Oct. 27, 2013 at 12:26 AM

 Interesting.  I guess at my son's school if a class is full then they can't transfer a kid out & transfer another one in. 

Quoting frndlyfn:

Our teachers use a certain saying that the students need to repeat back to them before they start their lessons or start saying something of importance.  I have heard that a few teachers will transfer those trouble students out of their class to another teacher to try to rein them in.

 

mommy2cristian
by Bronze Member on Oct. 27, 2013 at 12:27 AM
1 mom liked this
Quoting mom22tumblebugs:

My daughters teachers use a clip chart. They start on "ready to learn" and based on their behavior during the day they either move their clip up or down. Up and they can earn a class buck, which they can trade in for an incentive later.

My son's teacher does this but it doesn't seem to work.
mommy2cristian
by Bronze Member on Oct. 27, 2013 at 12:31 AM

BUMP!

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Oct. 27, 2013 at 8:21 AM
1 mom liked this

1.  You had to move your chair or sit in the back of the class.  This is something I rarely do. Many times when kids are being disruptive or acting out it's related to the fact that the child is struggling academically. So moving the child to the back totally undermines the goal of helping the child catch up. It also send the student the message that we don't want them as part of the class. Kids with behavior issues also tend to have low self esteem. So sending them to the back makes them feel even more rejected and act out more. 

Instruction has really changed over the years. Little of my day is whole group lecture. The students are working together and discussing their learning all day. So a child sitting alone is really at a huge disadvantage. 

A teacher sitting a child at the back of the class has basically given up on the child. There are very few circumstances when that will improve the situation. Most of the time the child will be worse. 

2.  You had to turn around & face the wall or stand in the corner.  I would never do that. It's humiliating and totally inappropriate in a school setting. 

3.  You were sent to the office continuously if you were a problem. That is done at my school.  But as little as possible. Teachers who do it often aren't taken very seriously when they do it. I hardly ever send a student so when I do the administration knows it's a big deal. 

4.  You had to write a sentence 50 or 100 times.  I've tried that and most kids just don't care. It's just a waste of time and paper and doesn't help. 

5.  A note was sent home obviously.  Absolutely. And here is where I think the difference is between today and years ago. The parents of students who misbehave rarely support the school. They either ignore the misbehavior or blame their child and other students. With out support from parents discipline at school is an uphill battle to say the least. 

6.  Your parent had to have a meeting with the principal. Same as above. An example of this would be a student this year who has been an ongoing behavior problem.  Her mother has been a no show for 3 conferences with school administration and me in a two week period.  Her excuses were that she was tired, she didn't have any gas, and now the third time she won't even answer her phone any more. 

7.  If you were really bad then your mom or dad had to come & sit in class with you  I have offered this to many parents. None of them are willing to do it. There are parents I wouldn't allow to do this because I suspect their own behavior would be disruptive while in the room. 

mjande4
by Platinum Member on Oct. 27, 2013 at 8:24 AM
1 mom liked this

Well stated.  Of course, without parent's taking responsibility for raising kids, it's just an uphill battle.


Quoting maxswolfsuit:

1.  You had to move your chair or sit in the back of the class.  This is something I rarely do. Many times when kids are being disruptive or acting out it's related to the fact that the child is struggling academically. So moving the child to the back totally undermines the goal of helping the child catch up. It also send the student the message that we don't want them as part of the class. Kids with behavior issues also tend to have low self esteem. So sending them to the back makes them feel even more rejected and act out more. 

Instruction has really changed over the years. Little of my day is whole group lecture. The students are working together and discussing their learning all day. So a child sitting alone is really at a huge disadvantage. 

A teacher sitting a child at the back of the class has basically given up on the child. There are very few circumstances when that will improve the situation. Most of the time the child will be worse. 

2.  You had to turn around & face the wall or stand in the corner.  I would never do that. It's humiliating and totally inappropriate in a school setting. 

3.  You were sent to the office continuously if you were a problem. That is done at my school.  But as little as possible. Teachers who do it often aren't taken very seriously when they do it. I hardly ever send a student so when I do the administration knows it's a big deal. 

4.  You had to write a sentence 50 or 100 times.  I've tried that and most kids just don't care. It's just a waste of time and paper and doesn't help. 

5.  A note was sent home obviously.  Absolutely. And here is where I think the difference is between today and years ago. The parents of students who misbehave rarely support the school. They either ignore the misbehavior or blame their child and other students. With out support from parents discipline at school is an uphill battle to say the least. 

6.  Your parent had to have a meeting with the principal. Same as above. An example of this would be a student this year who has been an ongoing behavior problem.  Her mother has been a no show for 3 conferences with school administration and me in a two week period.  Her excuses were that she was tired, she didn't have any gas, and now the third time she won't even answer her phone any more. 

7.  If you were really bad then your mom or dad had to come & sit in class with you  I have offered this to many parents. None of them are willing to do it. There are parents I wouldn't allow to do this because I suspect their own behavior would be disruptive while in the room. 



maxswolfsuit
by Max on Oct. 27, 2013 at 8:26 AM
1 mom liked this

What works for me with disruptive students is building a strong sense of community in the class. When students get to know each other and care about each other they can see how their behavior impacts others and they don't want to hurt anyone. 

When kids who misbehave are ostracized it just snowballs and becomes a bigger problem down the line. 

mjande4
by Platinum Member on Oct. 27, 2013 at 8:30 AM


To piggy back on this, peer motivation/expectations really are huge motivators.  Kids, in general, don't appreciate problem students and they will tell each other so. Generally, it's just a little reminder like "hey shh".  lol

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

What works for me with disruptive students is building a strong sense of community in the class. When students get to know each other and care about each other they can see how their behavior impacts others and they don't want to hurt anyone. 

When kids who misbehave are ostracized it just snowballs and becomes a bigger problem down the line. 



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