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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

This is MY childs math homework

Posted by on Mar. 8, 2014 at 8:26 PM
  • 58 Replies

She is in 5th grade. This is call the "lattice." I don't get it at all but I was never good at math and it works for her. I will never be able to help her with math homework again. LOL


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by on Mar. 8, 2014 at 8:26 PM
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SouthernMamaof1
by Member on Mar. 8, 2014 at 8:33 PM
4 moms liked this
When I used to teach 5th/math, I would teach that method to the students who struggled with the traditional approach of multiplication. Most of them seemed to prefer it. I now teach 7th, and I always have a few students who prefer it. The whole purpose is so that students are able to find a way that works for them.
Sebbiemama
by Member on Mar. 8, 2014 at 8:39 PM
1 mom liked this

Why? I understand what they are doing - it seems to be pretty much the exact same process as the old way of multiplying but not it's in a weird slanty box. But why? Are they trying to introduce the concept of matrices by turning simpler mathmatical processes into unduly complex matrix-like things? 

Sebbiemama
by Member on Mar. 8, 2014 at 8:41 PM
1 mom liked this

Okay - I can understand that. I guess whatever works for a kid, works, right?

Quoting SouthernMamaof1: When I used to teach 5th/math, I would teach that method to the students who struggled with the traditional approach of multiplication. Most of them seemed to prefer it. I now teach 7th, and I always have a few students who prefer it. The whole purpose is so that students are able to find a way that works for them.


steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Mar. 8, 2014 at 8:41 PM
2 moms liked this

 Both of my boys learned this way, along with the traditional way that I learned in school.  I don't think that it is bad for children to learn how to solve problems in multiple ways.  One of the biggest problems with the US is that we were all taught that there was a right way and a wrong way to do things, instead of being taught to look at problems from different angles and solving them in different ways.

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Mar. 8, 2014 at 8:42 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting Sebbiemama:

Why? I understand what they are doing - it seems to be pretty much the exact same process as the old way of multiplying but not it's in a weird slanty box. But why? Are they trying to introduce the concept of matrices by turning simpler mathmatical processes into unduly complex matrix-like things? 

For some kids it's much easier. Lots of kids who struggle with the traditional method pick this up very quickly. It's really the same, just write differently. 

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Mar. 8, 2014 at 8:43 PM
7 moms liked this

And before anyone says it... This is NOT Common Core!! 

The lattice method has been around long before Common Core. So if you don't like it don't blame Common Core!

t1gger143
by Member on Mar. 8, 2014 at 8:44 PM
I need to learn this. I teach algebra and many of my students cannot multiply.
AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Mar. 8, 2014 at 8:45 PM
3 moms liked this

The problem is requiring all students to use it, instead of just those who find it easier.

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maxswolfsuit
by Max on Mar. 8, 2014 at 8:50 PM


Quoting AutymsMommy:

The problem is requiring all students to use it, instead of just those who find it easier.

Where are all students being required to use it? 

There seems to be confusing between requiring to practice and try a new method as opposed to requiring student to use it on tests or assignments. I've never seen a math curriculum that forces to students to use specific methods other than during the lessons that present those methods. On tests and assessments specific methods aren't dictated that must be used. 

I've never seen the lattice method be presented as a mandatory way of solving problems. 

wakymom
by Ruby Member on Mar. 8, 2014 at 8:52 PM

 Ds2 started learning that method earlier this yr in 4th gr. I admit, I found it confusing at first, but once I figured it out, I can see why some kids might like it better. I prefer the "old-fashioned" way, though.

 

 

 

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