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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Perseverance

Posted by on Mar. 9, 2014 at 10:20 PM
  • 4 Replies
Apparently this is s common core standard for kids leaving kindergarten. Is it possible to teach it when it hasn't come naturally to a first grader.
by on Mar. 9, 2014 at 10:20 PM
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Willow_Phoenix
by on Mar. 9, 2014 at 10:34 PM

Yes it is. There are a lot of ways you can teach this to kids. Giving them spelling words that are difficult and having them keep trying to get it until they do. Setting a goal and seeing how long and how many hours/tims they have to try to reach whatever their goal is. With my daughter she's learning it with violin that she started when she was 6 years old (she wanted the violin but she expected to be perfect at every song right away). So it is possible but you have to either start small or do it in a way that doesn't discourage the children.

clairewait
by Member on Mar. 10, 2014 at 12:08 AM

Haha.

In theory, I totally get your question and you are right. It is a funny lesson to teach a little kid.

I think more than anything giving them the vocabulary to define different feelings and common issues is probably the more important point. Is a Kindergartener or 1st grader really going master perseverence during the year? Hah. 

But I do totally agree with introducing complex concepts and the words to describe them very early. I think they get things a lot quicker when they are younger.

One thing I taught my Kindergartener last year was the word "figurative language" and more specifically "metaphor." We use a lot of sarcasm in our house, and of course in life, almost everyone speaks in hyperbole and metaphor. Kids are so literal. 

It has been really great to have a child who can point out the difference between fact and "metaphor." (Okay, a little dorky, but you know... I love it.)

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Mar. 10, 2014 at 6:19 AM

It's technically not a standard and it's not just for kindergarten. It's part of the mathematical practices students should be applying at a developmentally appropriate level ever year. 

Students must learn to persevere thought difficult content by trouble shooting and applying different strategies. They absolute can an must be taught this skill. It's a huge cultural problem that generally the students first inclination is to skip the difficult content or guess and move on. 

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Mar. 10, 2014 at 6:20 AM

Here's a good explanation of what it means. 

1 Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them

What it means: Understand the problem, find a way to attack it, and work until it is done. Basically, you will find practice standard #1 in every math problem, every day. The hardest part is pushing students to solve tough problems by applying what they already know and to monitor themselves when problem-solving.Own it: Give students tough tasks and let them work through them. Allow wait time for yourself and your students. Work for progress and “aha” moments. The math becomes about the process and not about the one right answer. Lead with questions, but don’t pick up a pencil. Have students make headway in the task themselves.

Useful resources: The Georgia Department of Education has created critical-thinking math tasks for every standard. The New York City Department of Education has a set of aligned tasks as well.

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