Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

how much do you care about how your kid does on state testing

Posted by on Mar. 15, 2014 at 8:11 AM
  • 57 Replies

So next week is the first part of the big state tests here. They have no affect on their grades. They have to pass it but not until high school and they have so many times to retake or they don't graduate. I have never been a fan of standardized tests, some kids don't test well that way and doesn't mean they aren't smart or teachers aren't doing their job. While I can see they have place to gage where class is but think looking at just that like they tend to do in rating a school isn't seeing the big picture.

This is a BIG thing here. Tests scores will be released in the fall for tests taken in the spring and list of the best schools and districts in state will come out based on this. I know there are schools that rate very high on that list that essentially teach around the test and weed out kids that won't do well.And maybe its because I am mom of a special ed kid I see it different. I think a good school is a school that educates all not just those they deem will get them good tests scores. Anyway because of the pressure to do good on these test because state also links funding to them and also rate schools based on their test scores, teacher also feel the pressure for their kids to pass. Its crazy they do practice tests leading up when they probably should be focused on learning. And they get kids like mine who has anxiety to begin with in a panic...yah thats a good state of mind to be in when its time to take a test.

No I have learned to keep my mouth shut. I was happy with his last 2 years. He passed both years but first year was in the passing but needs improvement in both reading and math and only missed profient in math by 4 points. For him who they felt in kindy would never even be able to finished that test was awesome and a great example at how well the school has served him. Last year he was profient in math and still needs improvement in english language arts but his score went up 8 points. Awesome right??? Nope again part of his IEP meeting is about his lackluster preformance. Really people we sat here 5 years ago between his ADHD, reading delays and motor skills issues and wonder would he even be able to finish a test and while yes he has accomidations wouldn't the fact they he is passing and continuely improving show you are doing something right? And I know in theory they get that but those above them and so on are just going to look at those 2 tests scores and rate his teachers and school. Also not factored in would be that they took a C and D student who is now and A and B with an occassional C.

OK this is turning into a rant but MIL was SHOCKED yesterday when I said I could care less how he does. Guess SIL is in a panick over them doing practice tests at home too.

by on Mar. 15, 2014 at 8:11 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
Andrewsmom70
by Gold Member on Mar. 15, 2014 at 8:36 AM
4 moms liked this
Standardized tests aren't the end all, be all that the powers that be want them to be. However, having a test that all students take can help serve as a snapshot of how students and teachers are doing. There needs to be some way to assess the performance of both groups and no one has come up with a practical alternative method at this point.

As for my child, I want him to do his best on everything he does, including standardized testing. But I'm not going to beat him over the head and hound him about it.
mjande4
by Platinum Member on Mar. 15, 2014 at 8:41 AM
2 moms liked this

This is the way I have always looked at it too.  In addition, in our state if  you exceed in all categories and have a certain GPA, then you receive a full tuition waiver to any of the universities in the state.  That, to me, is a pretty powerful incentive.  My kids are all good testers and I think it's important to make sure kids know HOW to take a test.  There are very FEW careers that don't have some type of test/license exam so I treat it as a part of the educational process.

Quoting Andrewsmom70: Standardized tests aren't the end all, be all that the powers that be want them to be. However, having a test that all students take can help serve as a snapshot of how students and teachers are doing. There needs to be some way to assess the performance of both groups and no one has come up with a practical alternative method at this point. As for my child, I want him to do his best on everything he does, including standardized testing. But I'm not going to beat him over the head and hound him about it.


coolmommy2x
by Gold Member on Mar. 15, 2014 at 8:43 AM
1 mom liked this
Our schools don't place a huge deal on them and we rock them each year. Maybe because they're laid back about it, IDK. Ours start in 2 weeks and the kids usually look forward to testing week because it generally means no homework. LOL!

DS is in 8th grade and does very well on them, this will be DD's first year taking them and she's excited. I think it makes her feel more grown up. Neither is nervous and I don't think they've even given it much thought.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
cupcake_mom
by Bronze Member on Mar. 15, 2014 at 8:48 AM
I hate the SOLs. That's all the preach here and I hate it. I hated it when I was in school and I hate them now that my dd is in school. She doesn't take them for another 2 years and they already pounding it into their heads
ljmom24
by Bronze Member on Mar. 15, 2014 at 8:50 AM

 

Quoting mjande4:

This is the way I have always looked at it too.  In addition, in our state if  you exceed in all categories and have a certain GPA, then you receive a full tuition waiver to any of the universities in the state.  That, to me, is a pretty powerful incentive.  My kids are all good testers and I think it's important to make sure kids know HOW to take a test.  There are very FEW careers that don't have some type of test/license exam so I treat it as a part of the educational process.

Quoting Andrewsmom70: Standardized tests aren't the end all, be all that the powers that be want them to be. However, having a test that all students take can help serve as a snapshot of how students and teachers are doing. There needs to be some way to assess the performance of both groups and no one has come up with a practical alternative method at this point. As for my child, I want him to do his best on everything he does, including standardized testing. But I'm not going to beat him over the head and hound him about it.

 

Oh they give state schoolarships to top performers on the state test here for state tuition but its only tuition and on aveage for a state college the tution is about $900 a year but fees that are not included in scholarship is over $7000 a year and room and board which also isn't covered is $5000-10,000. So it sounds like a great incentive but if you are a kid in the top of the class with GPA you are going to get a better deal at a private school who are not going to give a rat's a$$ about a state test. Known a few parents in SHOCK when they see how little that scholarship covers.

ljmom24
by Bronze Member on Mar. 15, 2014 at 8:53 AM

 

Quoting cupcake_mom: I hate the SOLs. That's all the preach here and I hate it. I hated it when I was in school and I hate them now that my dd is in school. She doesn't take them for another 2 years and they already pounding it into their heads

 We start in 3rd grade but they start preping them in kindergarten (insert eye roll) I have one in private school where they don't have to take them. If I could afford id keep him there. Its such a different experience. They too take standard tests but less emphasis on it year round. They still have high acedemic standards but they aren't preaching this test to the kids.

mjande4
by Platinum Member on Mar. 15, 2014 at 8:56 AM

Ours covers EVERYTHING.  Now, my daughter currently is #2 out of 550 so I'm not really concerned about the state schools, she's not planning to go there anyway.  My point was that it's not all bad.  Learning to test correctly is a SKILL and even though you aren't a fan, you might want to get on board so that your son has these important skills.  I find that parents, especially moms, that aren't keen on some educational aspects, such as testing, were not good students themselves and tend to project their fears/dislikes on to their own kids.  

Quoting ljmom24:


Quoting mjande4:

This is the way I have always looked at it too.  In addition, in our state if  you exceed in all categories and have a certain GPA, then you receive a full tuition waiver to any of the universities in the state.  That, to me, is a pretty powerful incentive.  My kids are all good testers and I think it's important to make sure kids know HOW to take a test.  There are very FEW careers that don't have some type of test/license exam so I treat it as a part of the educational process.

Quoting Andrewsmom70: Standardized tests aren't the end all, be all that the powers that be want them to be. However, having a test that all students take can help serve as a snapshot of how students and teachers are doing. There needs to be some way to assess the performance of both groups and no one has come up with a practical alternative method at this point. As for my child, I want him to do his best on everything he does, including standardized testing. But I'm not going to beat him over the head and hound him about it.


Oh they give state schoolarships to top performers on the state test here for state tuition but its only tuition and on aveage for a state college the tution is about $900 a year but fees that are not included in scholarship is over $7000 a year and room and board which also isn't covered is $5000-10,000. So it sounds like a great incentive but if you are a kid in the top of the class with GPA you are going to get a better deal at a private school who are not going to give a rat's a$$ about a state test. Known a few parents in SHOCK when they see how little that scholarship covers.


ljmom24
by Bronze Member on Mar. 15, 2014 at 9:45 AM

 Nope I graduated with honors with my BS and MS but at least the universties I attended never used standardized tesing to test students. Last time I took a standarized test aside from SAT or GRE was in high school. Most college tests I had didn't even involve multiple choice. Kids need to learn to test in multiple ways but when you are only foucsing on this one test and even dedicting class time leading up to it you are robbing our kids or other aspects of their education.

 My issue with the test is the place too much on it especially for grades 3-8 when it doesn't even count towards a grade. Why put so much emphasis on a test when they could be focusing more on going over what they are graded on.

Oh and the other thing I learned in college is how to think for myself and advocate for myself and my child and not just fall in line like a drone. Would you follow someone into a fire pit just because they are in charge and told you it was right? So no I don't have to just get on board with something I don't think is beneficial. This isn't a communist country last time I checked. Then again you are assuming I am stupid and uneducated enough to check.

Quoting mjande4:

Ours covers EVERYTHING.  Now, my daughter currently is #2 out of 550 so I'm not really concerned about the state schools, she's not planning to go there anyway.  My point was that it's not all bad.  Learning to test correctly is a SKILL and even though you aren't a fan, you might want to get on board so that your son has these important skills.  I find that parents, especially moms, that aren't keen on some educational aspects, such as testing, were not good students themselves and tend to project their fears/dislikes on to their own kids.  

Quoting ljmom24:

 

Quoting mjande4:

This is the way I have always looked at it too.  In addition, in our state if  you exceed in all categories and have a certain GPA, then you receive a full tuition waiver to any of the universities in the state.  That, to me, is a pretty powerful incentive.  My kids are all good testers and I think it's important to make sure kids know HOW to take a test.  There are very FEW careers that don't have some type of test/license exam so I treat it as a part of the educational process.

Quoting Andrewsmom70: Standardized tests aren't the end all, be all that the powers that be want them to be. However, having a test that all students take can help serve as a snapshot of how students and teachers are doing. There needs to be some way to assess the performance of both groups and no one has come up with a practical alternative method at this point. As for my child, I want him to do his best on everything he does, including standardized testing. But I'm not going to beat him over the head and hound him about it.

 

Oh they give state schoolarships to top performers on the state test here for state tuition but its only tuition and on aveage for a state college the tution is about $900 a year but fees that are not included in scholarship is over $7000 a year and room and board which also isn't covered is $5000-10,000. So it sounds like a great incentive but if you are a kid in the top of the class with GPA you are going to get a better deal at a private school who are not going to give a rat's a$$ about a state test. Known a few parents in SHOCK when they see how little that scholarship covers.

 

 

mjande4
by Platinum Member on Mar. 15, 2014 at 9:50 AM

Your reply doesn't really lend itself to sounding very educated.  Maybe read it out loud.  Spellcheck is also your friend.  Testing once a year is not that big of a deal unless you make it one.  Because my daughter has experienced exit exams/standardized testing since early elementary, she has no worries about her upcoming AP exams and knows how to prepare for them.  As I said previously, test taking is a SKILL and the earlier kids learn that SKILL, the more proficient they will be when it's a high stakes situation such as college entrance (ACT/SAT), college credit, or a career.  No one is advocating testing multiple times a year at this level, but goodness once is not going to hurt anyone.

Quoting ljmom24:

 Nope I graduated with honors with my BS and MS but at least the universties I attended never used standardized tesing to test students. Last time I took a standarized test aside from SAT or GRE was in high school. Most college tests I had didn't even involve multiple choice. Kids need to learn to test in multiple ways but when you are only foucsing on this one test and even dedicting class time leading up to it you are robbing our kids or other aspects of their education.

 My issue with the test is the place too much on it especially for grades 3-8 when it doesn't even count towards a grade. Why put so much emphasis on a test when they could be focusing more on going over what they are graded on.

Oh and the other thing I learned in college is how to think for myself and advocate for myself and my child and not just fall in line like a drone. Would you follow someone into a fire pit just because they are in charge and told you it was right? So no I don't have to just get on board with something I don't think is beneficial. This isn't a communist country last time I checked. Then again you are assuming I am stupid and uneducated enough to check.

Quoting mjande4:

Ours covers EVERYTHING.  Now, my daughter currently is #2 out of 550 so I'm not really concerned about the state schools, she's not planning to go there anyway.  My point was that it's not all bad.  Learning to test correctly is a SKILL and even though you aren't a fan, you might want to get on board so that your son has these important skills.  I find that parents, especially moms, that aren't keen on some educational aspects, such as testing, were not good students themselves and tend to project their fears/dislikes on to their own kids.  

Quoting ljmom24:


Quoting mjande4:

This is the way I have always looked at it too.  In addition, in our state if  you exceed in all categories and have a certain GPA, then you receive a full tuition waiver to any of the universities in the state.  That, to me, is a pretty powerful incentive.  My kids are all good testers and I think it's important to make sure kids know HOW to take a test.  There are very FEW careers that don't have some type of test/license exam so I treat it as a part of the educational process.

Quoting Andrewsmom70: Standardized tests aren't the end all, be all that the powers that be want them to be. However, having a test that all students take can help serve as a snapshot of how students and teachers are doing. There needs to be some way to assess the performance of both groups and no one has come up with a practical alternative method at this point. As for my child, I want him to do his best on everything he does, including standardized testing. But I'm not going to beat him over the head and hound him about it.


Oh they give state schoolarships to top performers on the state test here for state tuition but its only tuition and on aveage for a state college the tution is about $900 a year but fees that are not included in scholarship is over $7000 a year and room and board which also isn't covered is $5000-10,000. So it sounds like a great incentive but if you are a kid in the top of the class with GPA you are going to get a better deal at a private school who are not going to give a rat's a$$ about a state test. Known a few parents in SHOCK when they see how little that scholarship covers.




maxswolfsuit
by Max on Mar. 15, 2014 at 9:56 AM

This completely. 

As a teacher I don't love the tests. But I absolutely feel they are necessary. Schools, districts, and states need some sort of tool to measure student achievement. 

While I don't think scores should be used to evaluate individual students. I do think the students who fail the tests are, for the most part, really struggling with the skills. A passing score (at least in my state) can be achieved by a struggling students. After giving the tests for many years I can't say I ever had a student get the lowest score who was able to demonstrate he or she could read in class. Some kids might not have done quite as well as I hoped they would, but I never had a student score below grade level who wasn't. 

Quoting Andrewsmom70: Standardized tests aren't the end all, be all that the powers that be want them to be. However, having a test that all students take can help serve as a snapshot of how students and teachers are doing. There needs to be some way to assess the performance of both groups and no one has come up with a practical alternative method at this point. As for my child, I want him to do his best on everything he does, including standardized testing. But I'm not going to beat him over the head and hound him about it.


Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)