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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Special education class

Posted by on Mar. 27, 2014 at 6:41 PM
  • 30 Replies
My daughter had her three year check up yesterday and she did not pass the questionnaire paper I filled out behavior wise. She has to have an assessment at our local primary school. Has anyone experienced this? What was the outcome? My daughter is very smart and learns fast, it's just she is always jumpy and won't sit still much. But she knows her basic stuff. If she do get put into special education classes can she still go to regular kindergarten?
by on Mar. 27, 2014 at 6:41 PM
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Replies (1-10):
maxswolfsuit
by Max on Mar. 27, 2014 at 6:51 PM
1 mom liked this

The programs offered and the criteria for qualifying really depend on your local school.  I can only answer based on my school, but yours could be totally different.

We have a Developmentally Delayed IEP program. It's for students with normal intelligence who aren't keeping up with their peers because of maturity or delayed development of other skills. Students in this program sometimes have behavior concerns, fine or gross motor skills delays, or social issues. 

It's for students that are not necessarily candidates for a long term IEP. (Although there are certainly times when the student ends up qualifying for an IEP with a different disability) Students labeled as DD are put in ESE inclusion rooms. There is a mix of students with disabilities and general education students and an ESE certified teacher. The children get additional support and monitoring to ensure they can keep up with their peers. 

When a child turns seven they are no longer eligible for the program and the IEP becomes null. If the child is still struggling the school would look into other areas and change the IEP to keep it for the long term.

madimikemom
by on Mar. 27, 2014 at 7:26 PM
Is your child in this class?

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

The programs offered and the criteria for qualifying really depend on your local school.  I can only answer based on my school, but yours could be totally different.

We have a Developmentally Delayed IEP program. It's for students with normal intelligence who aren't keeping up with their peers because of maturity or delayed development of other skills. Students in this program sometimes have behavior concerns, fine or gross motor skills delays, or social issues. 

It's for students that are not necessarily candidates for a long term IEP. (Although there are certainly times when the student ends up qualifying for an IEP with a different disability) Students labeled as DD are put in ESE inclusion rooms. There is a mix of students with disabilities and general education students and an ESE certified teacher. The children get additional support and monitoring to ensure they can keep up with their peers. 

When a child turns seven they are no longer eligible for the program and the IEP becomes null. If the child is still struggling the school would look into other areas and change the IEP to keep it for the long term.

madimikemom
by on Mar. 27, 2014 at 7:37 PM
Is your child in this class?

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

The programs offered and the criteria for qualifying really depend on your local school.  I can only answer based on my school, but yours could be totally different.

We have a Developmentally Delayed IEP program. It's for students with normal intelligence who aren't keeping up with their peers because of maturity or delayed development of other skills. Students in this program sometimes have behavior concerns, fine or gross motor skills delays, or social issues. 

It's for students that are not necessarily candidates for a long term IEP. (Although there are certainly times when the student ends up qualifying for an IEP with a different disability) Students labeled as DD are put in ESE inclusion rooms. There is a mix of students with disabilities and general education students and an ESE certified teacher. The children get additional support and monitoring to ensure they can keep up with their peers. 

When a child turns seven they are no longer eligible for the program and the IEP becomes null. If the child is still struggling the school would look into other areas and change the IEP to keep it for the long term.

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Mar. 27, 2014 at 7:52 PM

Actually he is. But he doesn't have an IEP. He's one of the general education students in the class. 

I know this becuase I am a teacher at the school. 

Quoting madimikemom: Is your child in this class?
Quoting maxswolfsuit:

The programs offered and the criteria for qualifying really depend on your local school.  I can only answer based on my school, but yours could be totally different.

We have a Developmentally Delayed IEP program. It's for students with normal intelligence who aren't keeping up with their peers because of maturity or delayed development of other skills. Students in this program sometimes have behavior concerns, fine or gross motor skills delays, or social issues. 

It's for students that are not necessarily candidates for a long term IEP. (Although there are certainly times when the student ends up qualifying for an IEP with a different disability) Students labeled as DD are put in ESE inclusion rooms. There is a mix of students with disabilities and general education students and an ESE certified teacher. The children get additional support and monitoring to ensure they can keep up with their peers. 

When a child turns seven they are no longer eligible for the program and the IEP becomes null. If the child is still struggling the school would look into other areas and change the IEP to keep it for the long term.


madimikemom
by on Mar. 27, 2014 at 7:56 PM
Does the class seem to benefit him?

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Actually he is. But he doesn't have an IEP. He's one of the general education students in the class. 

I know this becuase I am a teacher at the school. 

Quoting madimikemom: Is your child in this class?

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

The programs offered and the criteria for qualifying really depend on your local school.  I can only answer based on my school, but yours could be totally different.

We have a Developmentally Delayed IEP program. It's for students with normal intelligence who aren't keeping up with their peers because of maturity or delayed development of other skills. Students in this program sometimes have behavior concerns, fine or gross motor skills delays, or social issues. 

It's for students that are not necessarily candidates for a long term IEP. (Although there are certainly times when the student ends up qualifying for an IEP with a different disability) Students labeled as DD are put in ESE inclusion rooms. There is a mix of students with disabilities and general education students and an ESE certified teacher. The children get additional support and monitoring to ensure they can keep up with their peers. 

When a child turns seven they are no longer eligible for the program and the IEP becomes null. If the child is still struggling the school would look into other areas and change the IEP to keep it for the long term.

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Mar. 27, 2014 at 8:02 PM

yes

Quoting madimikemom: Does the class seem to benefit him?
Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Actually he is. But he doesn't have an IEP. He's one of the general education students in the class. 

I know this becuase I am a teacher at the school. 

Quoting madimikemom: Is your child in this class?
Quoting maxswolfsuit:

The programs offered and the criteria for qualifying really depend on your local school.  I can only answer based on my school, but yours could be totally different.

We have a Developmentally Delayed IEP program. It's for students with normal intelligence who aren't keeping up with their peers because of maturity or delayed development of other skills. Students in this program sometimes have behavior concerns, fine or gross motor skills delays, or social issues. 

It's for students that are not necessarily candidates for a long term IEP. (Although there are certainly times when the student ends up qualifying for an IEP with a different disability) Students labeled as DD are put in ESE inclusion rooms. There is a mix of students with disabilities and general education students and an ESE certified teacher. The children get additional support and monitoring to ensure they can keep up with their peers. 

When a child turns seven they are no longer eligible for the program and the IEP becomes null. If the child is still struggling the school would look into other areas and change the IEP to keep it for the long term.


madimikemom
by on Mar. 27, 2014 at 8:08 PM
Will he get to go to regular kindergarten

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

yes

Quoting madimikemom: Does the class seem to benefit him?

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Actually he is. But he doesn't have an IEP. He's one of the general education students in the class. 

I know this becuase I am a teacher at the school. 

Quoting madimikemom: Is your child in this class?

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

The programs offered and the criteria for qualifying really depend on your local school.  I can only answer based on my school, but yours could be totally different.

We have a Developmentally Delayed IEP program. It's for students with normal intelligence who aren't keeping up with their peers because of maturity or delayed development of other skills. Students in this program sometimes have behavior concerns, fine or gross motor skills delays, or social issues. 

It's for students that are not necessarily candidates for a long term IEP. (Although there are certainly times when the student ends up qualifying for an IEP with a different disability) Students labeled as DD are put in ESE inclusion rooms. There is a mix of students with disabilities and general education students and an ESE certified teacher. The children get additional support and monitoring to ensure they can keep up with their peers. 

When a child turns seven they are no longer eligible for the program and the IEP becomes null. If the child is still struggling the school would look into other areas and change the IEP to keep it for the long term.

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Mar. 27, 2014 at 8:20 PM

He is in kindergarten. 

It's a regular class that includes kids who need extra help. 

Quoting madimikemom: Will he get to go to regular kindergarten
Quoting maxswolfsuit:

yes

Quoting madimikemom: Does the class seem to benefit him?
Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Actually he is. But he doesn't have an IEP. He's one of the general education students in the class. 

I know this becuase I am a teacher at the school. 

Quoting madimikemom: Is your child in this class?
Quoting maxswolfsuit:

The programs offered and the criteria for qualifying really depend on your local school.  I can only answer based on my school, but yours could be totally different.

We have a Developmentally Delayed IEP program. It's for students with normal intelligence who aren't keeping up with their peers because of maturity or delayed development of other skills. Students in this program sometimes have behavior concerns, fine or gross motor skills delays, or social issues. 

It's for students that are not necessarily candidates for a long term IEP. (Although there are certainly times when the student ends up qualifying for an IEP with a different disability) Students labeled as DD are put in ESE inclusion rooms. There is a mix of students with disabilities and general education students and an ESE certified teacher. The children get additional support and monitoring to ensure they can keep up with their peers. 

When a child turns seven they are no longer eligible for the program and the IEP becomes null. If the child is still struggling the school would look into other areas and change the IEP to keep it for the long term.


Andrewsmom70
by Gold Member on Mar. 27, 2014 at 9:36 PM

I know here almost all kids are in regular education/inclusion classes and it is rare that there is a class full of special education students unless they are in the severe/profound area of special needs.

DrDoofenshmirtz
by Silver Member on Mar. 27, 2014 at 9:36 PM
1 mom liked this

These days, almost all kids go to a regular kindergarten, even if they have special needs.  Very, very few children are in a separate setting class.  Typically those that are have very big behavior issues or have so many academic needs that they cannot learn in a regular setting.

Also, getting intervention now may mean your child can learn the necessary skills to not even need special services by kindergarten.  A different case, but my friend's sons were diagnosed with autism at age 2.  Nonverbal, lots of issues.  By kindergarten, you would barely have known they were autistic and receive very few services now and are doing very well in school.

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