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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Things that will disqualify your child from being found eligible for an IEP...

Posted by on Apr. 12, 2014 at 7:41 PM
Max
  • 207 Replies

When students are evaluated for learning problems to see if they qualify for extra services at school other factors that impact learning must be ruled out. When these factors can't be ruled out the student will not qualify for an IEP. 

These factors include:


  • Frequently Ttransferring Schools: Every time a student changed schools learning is disrupted. No two schools are exactly on the same time frame for instruction. So when students transfer it's inevitable they end up repeating instruction of some skills and missing instruction on others. So when students transfer frequently over the course of several years their learning is going to be impacted. 
  • Poor Attendance: I would like to think this is obvious to parents. But many parents don't seem to realize how often their kids are absent. Truancy is a huge issue at my school. I have students who miss 20-30 days of school each year. To the parent that might not need seem like a lot. But when a student misses almost a day a week it's nearly impossible for them to keep up with their peers. 
  • Vision or Hearing Deficits: Vision and hearing screenings are part of the evaluation process. If a student doesn't pass one and the parent doesn't follow through with a trip to a specialist the student can't qualify. Obviously kids who can't see or hear what's happening in class aren't going to learn as much as their peers who can. 
  • Lack of Support for Education: This is a big gray area and I have never seen this actually used to disqualify a student. But if a student isn't doing homework, reading or even having conversations on a regular basis at home he isn't going to learn at the same rate as his peers. When parents don't attend conferences or communicate with teachers the student is not going to do as well as he could. 


Do you agree that students with the issues described above should be denied IEPs or do you think every student who is struggling should have one?

by on Apr. 12, 2014 at 7:41 PM
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Replies (1-10):
CometGirl
by Bronze Member on Apr. 12, 2014 at 7:52 PM

 I agree with the situations you describe a student should be denied.

GwenMB
by Gwen on Apr. 12, 2014 at 7:59 PM
3 moms liked this

Isn't Common Core supposed to fix the frequent school transfer issue?

I think it might make a difference why there are frequent school transfers.  If its because a parent is in the military & they are transferring due to the parent getting new stations - then I think this issue shouldn't disqualify a student from an IEP.

Same with poor attendance.  If their attendance is poor because of a health issue, that shouldn't disqualify them from an IEP.  There is a student at my sons' school who misses one day a week because she needs to get treatment for a rare genetic issue that she has at a hospital 3 hours away from us.  I believe the mother is keeping her up with the class by doing school work when they are gone (or something - I don't know the details, just that the girl misses one day a week, which the mother shared to a group of 550 people where I was in the audience).  If she needed an IEP, I would hope her weekly absences wouldn't keep her from getting one.

In general, though, I would think it quite reasonable that the issues you mentioned would keep a student from getting an IEP.  In some ways, it's a shame, though.  The IEP might be what they need to do better in school (assuming the issue keeping them from getting one can't be fixed for some reason).

Bluecalm
by Member on Apr. 12, 2014 at 8:01 PM
1 mom liked this
I'm stuck on the lack of support one. I certainly understand the reason, but on the other hand I hate to see kids floundering in school. I taught regular Ed at risk students and this was a big reason many had fallen behind.
maxswolfsuit
by Max on Apr. 12, 2014 at 8:06 PM

Common Core will help. But it mandates what must taught during the year, not the time of year it is taught. So if students transfer over summer they should have learned the same things as the kids in their new state did the year before.  But schools and districts will still have their own sequence and pace of instruction. So a student could transfer mid year and still miss some things.  I had a student transfer this year in November. We had just completed our multiplication unit and her old school was just starting. She totally missed it. 

Normally when students have health problems like that accommodations are made. They can get home based instruction or extra help through with a 504 plan. 

Quoting GwenMB:

Isn't Common Core supposed to fix the frequent school transfer issue?

I think it might make a difference why there are frequent school transfers.  If its because a parent is in the military & they are transferring due to the parent getting new stations - then I think this issue shouldn't disqualify a student from an IEP.

Same with poor attendance.  If their attendance is poor because of a health issue, that shouldn't disqualify them from an IEP.  There is a student at my sons' school who misses one day a week because she needs to get treatment for a rare genetic issue that she has at a hospital 3 hours away from us.  I believe the mother is keeping her up with the class by doing school work when they are gone (or something - I don't know the details, just that the girl misses one day a week, which the mother shared to a group of 550 people where I was in the audience).  If she needed an IEP, I would hope her weekly absences wouldn't keep her from getting one.

In general, though, I would think it quite reasonable that the issues you mentioned would keep a student from getting an IEP.  In some ways, it's a shame, though.  The IEP might be what they need to do better in school (assuming the issue keeping them from getting one can't be fixed for some reason).


ABCMomma0211
by on Apr. 12, 2014 at 8:07 PM
1 mom liked this
Sorry but i cant not get past the fact that transferring schools is a part of this....

If i as a parent feel the need my child needs an iep, then give it....why must it be a fight?
maxswolfsuit
by Max on Apr. 12, 2014 at 8:07 PM


Quoting Bluecalm: I'm stuck on the lack of support one. I certainly understand the reason, but on the other hand I hate to see kids floundering in school. I taught regular Ed at risk students and this was a big reason many had fallen behind.

Yeah, that one could apply to most kids who are struggling. 

Like I said, I've never even seen it used. 

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Apr. 12, 2014 at 8:09 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting ABCMomma0211: Sorry but i cant not get past the fact that transferring schools is a part of this.... If i as a parent feel the need my child needs an iep, then give it....why must it be a fight?

Because schools have limited resources. All parents want more for their kids. IEPs aren't just passed out like free candy. More importantly, if one of these factors is the reason a child is behind an IEP won't do anything to help them catch up. 

You don't think transfering schools several times a year would be the reason a child is behind?

cheetah90210
by Member on Apr. 12, 2014 at 8:12 PM
Yeah i agree
ABCMomma0211
by on Apr. 12, 2014 at 8:19 PM
Honestly i cant believe you are a teacher if you have to ask that question.....

You have heard of military correct????

Which means spouses get deployed, which means sometimes the wife moves home with family so they have help.

Also in military they are moved on a dime...,.sometimes they can get lucky and be there for a few years....then sometimes they are some where for two/six months....

So just because they are transferring doesnt mean they are at fault.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Quoting ABCMomma0211: Sorry but i cant not get past the fact that transferring schools is a part of this....

If i as a parent feel the need my child needs an iep, then give it....why must it be a fight?

Because schools have limited resources. All parents want more for their kids. IEPs aren't just passed out like free candy. More importantly, if one of these factors is the reason a child is behind an IEP won't do anything to help them catch up. 

You don't think transfering schools several times a year would be the reason a child is behind?

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Apr. 12, 2014 at 8:59 PM

And military families know that and take measures to make sure the impact on the kids is as minimal as possible. They also generally don't move several times a year every single year. 

But again, if a student in a military family is behind in school because of frequently moving how will having and IEP help the student catch up?

Quoting ABCMomma0211: Honestly i cant believe you are a teacher if you have to ask that question..... You have heard of military correct???? Which means spouses get deployed, which means sometimes the wife moves home with family so they have help. Also in military they are moved on a dime...,.sometimes they can get lucky and be there for a few years....then sometimes they are some where for two/six months.... So just because they are transferring doesnt mean they are at fault.
Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Quoting ABCMomma0211: Sorry but i cant not get past the fact that transferring schools is a part of this.... If i as a parent feel the need my child needs an iep, then give it....why must it be a fight?

Because schools have limited resources. All parents want more for their kids. IEPs aren't just passed out like free candy. More importantly, if one of these factors is the reason a child is behind an IEP won't do anything to help them catch up. 

You don't think transfering schools several times a year would be the reason a child is behind?


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