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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Common Core??

Posted by on Apr. 23, 2014 at 11:57 AM
  • 68 Replies

What is this all about? I have one dd in Kindergarten and I guess we aren't there yet. I have heard a lot of negative and no positive about it. Makes me dread the future school life for her, but I don't really know WHAT it is...

by on Apr. 23, 2014 at 11:57 AM
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Replies (1-10):
mjande4
by Platinum Member on Apr. 23, 2014 at 12:08 PM
8 moms liked this
It's a set of common STANDARDS, not curriculum, by the majority of states. It just means that if you move from one state to another in the middle of the year that the same things are being covered in the same grades. Much ado about nothing!
LiLsMaMa21
by Member on Apr. 23, 2014 at 12:08 PM

Bump

mom2jessnky
by Silver Member on Apr. 23, 2014 at 12:13 PM
3 moms liked this

It's a set of standards that children need to meet by the end of each grade. It's not curriculum, it's not telling teachers how to teach, and it's not a bad thing.  It just says by the end of first grade in math & reading your kid needs to be able to do X, Y, & Z.

And it's a great thing because it evens things up state to state (well for the states that are participating...) Currently or before CC an A student in SC would be a D student in CA, and that's not good.

nb34
by Member on Apr. 23, 2014 at 12:17 PM

I think it's a good thing to have standards. I am all for it.

ljmom24
by Silver Member on Apr. 23, 2014 at 12:21 PM
1 mom liked this

In theory it sounds great. We should be on same page through out the country but reality its not that way. Where I think the issues are coming up are implentation and new things always take times to get worked through. In my state they did education overhaul in the mid 90s and still some kinks but we did sign on for common core now looking at opting out. I am on the fence, we have made such strides and already have high educational standards vs other states so why rock the boat. Just since my oldest started kindergarten I have seen tests scores accross the board in his school rise so they are on to something but now things are up in the air and I worry it will set them back.

MomMomMomMama
by New Member on Apr. 23, 2014 at 12:28 PM
1 mom liked this

Eh - I'm a teacher (or was until this past year) and there are good and bad things about it.  Mandates without funding are never a good thing for the school - and this is another.  Also, in order for common core to really, REALLY work, you'd have to do away with grades and social promotion, and that's likely to not happen in the majority of the districts.   Many parents are picking fights with some one the material being used because the questions are created to promote reading comprehension, written communication, and critical thinking rather than just rote memorization:   So instead of asking the question what is 7 minus 2 and expect the student to write down 5, the question may say.  John has 7 red roses and gives 2 to his mother...draw a picture to show what is happening and write a sentence that tells the reader how many roses John has left.  Draw another picture to show john giving away more of his roses and write a sentence to explain how many roses he is giving away and how many he will have left.    Now, there may be 4 questions like that rather than 20 of the traditional type questions.   Again, good and bad with that as well.  

LiLsMaMa21
by Member on Apr. 23, 2014 at 3:48 PM
1 mom liked this

Oh my! At what grade are they starting this? That's a lot for a little one to comprehend!!

Quoting MomMomMomMama:

Eh - I'm a teacher (or was until this past year) and there are good and bad things about it.  Mandates without funding are never a good thing for the school - and this is another.  Also, in order for common core to really, REALLY work, you'd have to do away with grades and social promotion, and that's likely to not happen in the majority of the districts.   Many parents are picking fights with some one the material being used because the questions are created to promote reading comprehension, written communication, and critical thinking rather than just rote memorization:   So instead of asking the question what is 7 minus 2 and expect the student to write down 5, the question may say.  John has 7 red roses and gives 2 to his mother...draw a picture to show what is happening and write a sentence that tells the reader how many roses John has left.  Draw another picture to show john giving away more of his roses and write a sentence to explain how many roses he is giving away and how many he will have left.    Now, there may be 4 questions like that rather than 20 of the traditional type questions.   Again, good and bad with that as well.  


steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Apr. 23, 2014 at 4:16 PM
3 moms liked this

 Common Core is for every grade k-12.  The examples that the PP gave are not examples of kindergarten work and in all honesty are quite simple for the children to do.  Neither of my boys would bat an eye at something like that and both have been doing work like that since first grade.  The example below is one way of ensuring that children actually understand basic math instead of just memorizing math facts.  You can memorize the facts, yet not know how you reached that conclusion.  And that becomes problematic in middle and HS, when a strong knowledge of basic math concepts is necessary for the high levels of math being taught.

Quoting LiLsMaMa21:

Oh my! At what grade are they starting this? That's a lot for a little one to comprehend!!

Quoting MomMomMomMama:

Eh - I'm a teacher (or was until this past year) and there are good and bad things about it.  Mandates without funding are never a good thing for the school - and this is another.  Also, in order for common core to really, REALLY work, you'd have to do away with grades and social promotion, and that's likely to not happen in the majority of the districts.   Many parents are picking fights with some one the material being used because the questions are created to promote reading comprehension, written communication, and critical thinking rather than just rote memorization:   So instead of asking the question what is 7 minus 2 and expect the student to write down 5, the question may say.  John has 7 red roses and gives 2 to his mother...draw a picture to show what is happening and write a sentence that tells the reader how many roses John has left.  Draw another picture to show john giving away more of his roses and write a sentence to explain how many roses he is giving away and how many he will have left.    Now, there may be 4 questions like that rather than 20 of the traditional type questions.   Again, good and bad with that as well.  

 

 

mom22tumblebugs
by Gold Member on Apr. 23, 2014 at 4:50 PM
3 moms liked this

Common Core = Ass Backwards way of doing math. What you can compute in 3 steps, common core makes you do it in 15.

LiLsMaMa21
by Member on Apr. 23, 2014 at 4:55 PM

Well isn't that just a more complicated way of showing your work? Like when I was in hs it was show your work, or how you solved the problem otherwise it's not an acceptable answer. 

Quoting steelcrazy:

 Common Core is for every grade k-12.  The examples that the PP gave are not examples of kindergarten work and in all honesty are quite simple for the children to do.  Neither of my boys would bat an eye at something like that and both have been doing work like that since first grade.  The example below is one way of ensuring that children actually understand basic math instead of just memorizing math facts.  You can memorize the facts, yet not know how you reached that conclusion.  And that becomes problematic in middle and HS, when a strong knowledge of basic math concepts is necessary for the high levels of math being taught.

Quoting LiLsMaMa21:

Oh my! At what grade are they starting this? That's a lot for a little one to comprehend!!

Quoting MomMomMomMama:

Eh - I'm a teacher (or was until this past year) and there are good and bad things about it.  Mandates without funding are never a good thing for the school - and this is another.  Also, in order for common core to really, REALLY work, you'd have to do away with grades and social promotion, and that's likely to not happen in the majority of the districts.   Many parents are picking fights with some one the material being used because the questions are created to promote reading comprehension, written communication, and critical thinking rather than just rote memorization:   So instead of asking the question what is 7 minus 2 and expect the student to write down 5, the question may say.  John has 7 red roses and gives 2 to his mother...draw a picture to show what is happening and write a sentence that tells the reader how many roses John has left.  Draw another picture to show john giving away more of his roses and write a sentence to explain how many roses he is giving away and how many he will have left.    Now, there may be 4 questions like that rather than 20 of the traditional type questions.   Again, good and bad with that as well.  


 


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