Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Ask the Expert: Dealing with Bullies & Keeping a Positive Outlook!

Posted by on May. 15, 2014 at 11:29 AM
  • 22 Replies

CafeMom is excited to welcome Lizzie Velasquez, motivational speaker and author to the Elementary School Kids group!  Lizzie will be joining us for a week beginning Friday, May 16th to answer your questions dealing with bullying and keeping a positive outlook.

At 17 years old, Lizzie found an internet video of herself titled, "The Ugliest Woman in the World". Instead of letting nameless, faceless strangers define her, she turned the negativity into something positive and is helping other bullying victims.
Lizzie is working on a documentary, "The Lizzie Project" that will follow her journey to the other side of bullying, and her mission to inspire a more positive online world.

                                   

Lizzie Velasquez, 25 years old, is a graduate of Texas State University, a motivational speaker, and author of three books: Lizzie Beautiful, Be Beautiful, Be You, and Choosing Happiness. She is one of only three known people in the world with a medical condition that doesn’t allow her to gain weight or create muscle. In December 2013, she took the stage at TEDxAustinWomen and gave a talk titled ‘How Do You Define Yourself?’ that to-date has garnered over 10 million views across the web including both English and Spanish-subtitled versions. Her story has been featured on The View, Katie Couric, The Today Show, Dr. Drew, Inside Edition, Huffington Post, and Yahoo! News & Lifestyle among other national and international media. She has a wide social following with 118k+ subscribers on YouTube, 31.5k+ Twitter followers, 200k+ fans on Facebook, and 68k+ Instagram followers.


Help The Lizzie Project get to 10,000 backers!  Donate $5 now to help get the movie made and help stop bullying!
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/sarabordo/the-untitled-lizzie-velasquez-documentary

by on May. 15, 2014 at 11:29 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
SweetLuci
by Member on May. 15, 2014 at 11:52 AM
2 moms liked this

 What do you say to young girls to help them appreciate their internal beauty and not be so focused on the external?

babynurse244
by Beth on May. 15, 2014 at 12:18 PM
I believe it is easier to be a bully online because you can be fairly snobous. What are some things we can say to kids to keep them from becoming online bullies ?
johnny4ever
by Member on May. 15, 2014 at 2:18 PM

My son has had 2 Bullying Incidents.Both times required a Dcotor's visit.He is very shy and is a follower.He isn't one to speak up.He also has social anxeity.He is called Opie alot because of his red hair & fair skin & freckles.It is so painfull to see him go through this twice.Do you have any positive advice or follow through I can use?You are beautiful!!!

TurboMom81
by Member on May. 15, 2014 at 2:59 PM
My daughter was just diagnosed with Multiple Tic Disorder. Some days she comes home sad because children pick on her over it. I have Tourette's and I too was bullied over tics that I had no control over as a child all the way through my senior year of high school and it scarred me for life to be honest with you.
What advice would you have for a mother going through this situation? What can I say to my daughter to help her deal with others making rude comments over something she cannot control?
eclaudin
by Member on May. 15, 2014 at 4:16 PM
My nine year old daughter is currently being bullied by a boy who just came to her class in the middle of the year. The bullying seems to stem from him just not liking her, rather than picking on her appearance. The problem is, he is constantly telling her she should kill herself or that he wished she would die. This week he said in front of her and others that he hoped the overhead projector fell on her and kill her. The school has been working hard on this issue, but my concern is how many times can someone tell her he wished she were dead before she starts thinking it herself? She is a bright, beautiful, happy, outgoing girl, but as her parents we are scared to death of the self esteem issues this boy's abuse may ultimately cause. Any advice? What kind of things should I be saying or asking?
Reina13
by Bronze Member on May. 16, 2014 at 7:59 AM
1 mom liked this

My son has physical and intellectual delays. He is often made fun of for being 'stupid'. He is by no means stupid, he just learns slower and differently than others. How do we keep him from believing the negative things that are said about him when he knows that he is different from everyone else?

moonspinr
by New Member on May. 16, 2014 at 9:49 AM

I've talked with my daughter, and work hard to model for her, how you don't need to be friends with everyone, but you need to always treat others with kindness and respect.  How can I empower her to use that and stand up for herself when "mean girls" use unkind words?

mom-0f-3
by on May. 16, 2014 at 11:41 AM

My question really is similar to what SweetLuci had asked.  See my son who just turned 6 is a very loving boy but when he was born he had suffered and subdural hematoma and he has Erbs Palsy along with speech delays etc. Although he is getting physio, speech therapy etc hes not his age level.  Other kids can be so mean. 

countrygirlkat
by on May. 16, 2014 at 1:15 PM

This hits close to home as my 8 year old son was bullied terribly at school this year.  We finally felt we had to remove him from the school for his own safety and I am now homeschooling him.  I would like to know what I do to help build him back up and help him to truely realize deep down that the things the other kids were saying and doing weren't okay and weren't true about him?

thatgirl70
by Bronze Member on May. 16, 2014 at 1:42 PM

I grew up being teased and bullied for my entire school career. There is a small fear I have that my son will face the same treatment, though he such an outgoing and bright child. My mom didn't know how to handle it, or what to do (I grew up in the 70's and 80's, long before we started having the anti-bullying campaigns) so she just ignored it.

What advice would you give to someone who does not have the emotional support?

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)