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How are children put into a class?

Posted by on Jun. 2, 2014 at 1:45 PM
  • 81 Replies

I've always wondered how teachers come up with their class lists.

Is it all random and computerized, do you guys pull names from a hat? Do you request certain children to be in your class?

I was curious because in grade 1, I was sad to see some of my kinder friends go into the other grade 1 class, but again in grade 2, we all came together again in the same class. In grade 6, I was separated from my best friend so I bugged our principal to let her come into our class and he traded her for a boy to go with his friends in the other class lol.

My son is really pushing to go into the younger teacher's class because he likes the way she treats him. There's been a few times where she comforted him when he was injured or scared. I told him he shouldn't think too much about it because there's a chance he could go into the other teacher's class. I'm also worried about the separation issue from all the children he's familiar with in his class right now. 

Either way, I've talked to him that he should not be disappointed no matter whose class he gets put into because they are both wonderul ladies and very caring and dedicated to their jobs.

by on Jun. 2, 2014 at 1:45 PM
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Replies (1-10):
momtoBrenna
by Silver Member on Jun. 2, 2014 at 1:50 PM

I don't know how other schools do it but l, at my kids' school, they balance the classes by ability so that there is a range of abilities and needs in each class. There are only 2 classes per grade level K-8. For example, my ds has both sensory and medical concerns so they will look at that when setting class lists so that they don't have all of the high intensity kids in one class. K is 1-18 at his school too so that helps.

Hannahluvsdogs
by Silver Member on Jun. 2, 2014 at 1:50 PM

I've always wondered this too!

Liz132
by Member on Jun. 2, 2014 at 1:53 PM
I wonder the same thing. Bump!
Mocking.Jay
by Silver Member on Jun. 2, 2014 at 1:56 PM

Hmm! That is interesting! My son has some disabilities, but he's not "disabled" enough to have an inclusion worker or whatever although I feel he could benefit from a 1 on 1 to help him through instruction. Sometimes the teacher gets annoyed or raises her voice when I'm in the class asking him what his job should be. She forgets he processes information at a much different rate than everyone else and requires medication to help him focus a little bit. The medication is supposed to help, and not perfect his attention span.

Quoting momtoBrenna:

I don't know how other schools do it but l, at my kids' school, they balance the classes by ability so that there is a range of abilities and needs in each class. There are only 2 classes per grade level K-8. For example, my ds has both sensory and medical concerns so they will look at that when setting class lists so that they don't have all of the high intensity kids in one class. K is 1-18 at his school too so that helps.


balagan_imma
by Silver Member on Jun. 2, 2014 at 2:08 PM

My son's elementary school is a bit different from most. There are 2 teachers per grade, plus Hebrew and Judaics, and the kids have each teach at different parts of the day. The kids are really only with their 'homeroom' for specials. They are divided into subject rotations depending mostly on ability (with the occasional, don't put kid a with kid b or it will be a mess thing.)

coolmommy2x
by Platinum Member on Jun. 2, 2014 at 2:10 PM
The teachers meet as a team and divide the kids up keeping personalities/abilities and to a degree boy/girl ratios in mind. We also segregate by allergies in the lower grades.
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steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Jun. 2, 2014 at 2:22 PM

In our district, grades K-2 are grouped based on ability in math and reading.  There is typically one advanced class, two average classes, and one remedial class.  For grades 3-5 they are randomly placed in homerooms, each child has their own schedule that they follow.  They are placed in the core subjects based on ability in that particular subject.  Core subjects here are math, reading/ELA, science, and social studies.  The principal determines placements, parents and teachers have no input.

Mocking.Jay
by Silver Member on Jun. 2, 2014 at 2:27 PM

Ohhh cool! I would like someone else to answer to see if there are different ways in doing this. :) 

My son's teacher said she is more experienced with immigrant children and so the principal and other grade 1 teacher voted on her to take most of them. I did notice the other grade 1 class has much more white and black students. My son's class is VERY multi-cultural with 80% being immigrant children. There are 4 Asian, 7 Middle Eastern Indian children, 4 Canadian Indian (Aboriginal) children and the remaining 5 are white. 

Quoting coolmommy2x: The teachers meet as a team and divide the kids up keeping personalities/abilities and to a degree boy/girl ratios in mind. We also segregate by allergies in the lower grades.


Mocking.Jay
by Silver Member on Jun. 2, 2014 at 2:29 PM

Hmm. That's interesting. I would have to wonder how the principal can handle all of that responsibility and not get any input or help from teachers or parents.

Quoting steelcrazy:

In our district, grades K-2 are grouped based on ability in math and reading.  There is typically one advanced class, two average classes, and one remedial class.  For grades 3-5 they are randomly placed in homerooms, each child has their own schedule that they follow.  They are placed in the core subjects based on ability in that particular subject.  Core subjects here are math, reading/ELA, science, and social studies.  The principal determines placements, parents and teachers have no input.


coolmommy2x
by Platinum Member on Jun. 2, 2014 at 2:32 PM
That's it here too to a degree...there is one girl in the schoo with Downs and in 1st grade she had a teacher who has a brother with Downs. Some teachers might have experience with a type of student and have some in their classes but I know they work hard to keep ratios as equal as possible.

Quoting Mocking.Jay:

Ohhh cool! I would like someone else to answer to see if there are different ways in doing this. :) 

My son's teacher said she is more experienced with immigrant children and so the principal and other grade 1 teacher voted on her to take most of them. I did notice the other grade 1 class has much more white and black students. My son's class is VERY multi-cultural with 80% being immigrant children. There are 4 Asian, 7 Middle Eastern Indian children, 4 Canadian Indian (Aboriginal) children and the remaining 5 are white. 

Quoting coolmommy2x: The teachers meet as a team and divide the kids up keeping personalities/abilities and to a degree boy/girl ratios in mind. We also segregate by allergies in the lower grades.

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