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Advice Needed: Need guidance my son is having issues with learning to...

Posted by on Jul. 2, 2014 at 12:25 PM
  • 16 Replies

Need guidance, my son is having issues with learning to read. He just finished kindergarten and struggled but they have moved him up, They suggested tutoring over the summer which I opted not to do becuase of the cost. I was trying to work with him last night and he was sounding out the word Fast he did ok sounding it out but then he would say the word was Sad not fast after he had JUST sounded it out? I dont know if he is being stubborn, just not interested, or has a problem. Does anyone have any suggestions? He just turned 6 in June.

by on Jul. 2, 2014 at 12:25 PM
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Replies (1-10):
GwenMB
by Gwen on Jul. 2, 2014 at 12:27 PM
1 mom liked this

Has he been tested to see if he has any learning disabilities?

MommaB0334
by on Jul. 2, 2014 at 12:34 PM

No- I told his kindergarten teacher that my husband was concerned at one point and she said at that age when they are first learning that it was normal and she didnt seemed concerned about it being that.  She mentioned that being a boy it sometimes takes them a little longer.

 

steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Jul. 2, 2014 at 1:00 PM
1 mom liked this

Did you check to see if any education majors would be able to tutor him?  Typically college students are cheaper than those tutoring places and they normally will come to your house even.

wakymom
by Ruby Member on Jul. 2, 2014 at 1:00 PM
1 mom liked this

 Books on tape/cd can help- he can see the words as they are said.

http://www.starfall.com/

When he watches tv, turn on the closed captioning. If he's watching a dvd, turn on either the closed captioning or the English subtitles. It will work the same way books on tape do. My dh is hard of hearing, so we have the closed captioning on a lot, and dd learned to read that way. It probably helped my boys, too, but I didn't make the connection until dd read to me from a book that was new to all of us.

 

 

 

 

 

 

clairewait
by Bronze Member on Jul. 2, 2014 at 2:41 PM
1 mom liked this

He's still pretty young. I know public school is getting a little out of control on making milestones and hitting benchmarks, but boys tend to move at slower rates than girls, on average - and many who are "flagged" as strugglers in the early early years turn out just fine.

At this point, I think the best thing you can do is read to him, read with him, and read around him. I was a HS English teacher for several years, but actually majored in elementary ed. The most important thing, in my opinion, is interest in reading. Take off the pressure of being good at it. Help him to enjoy it.

We have never been a big TV or computer family (at least not with our kids) and have always had a pretty natural reading culture in our home. I have no idea where my 2nd grader is in comparison to her peers, but I do know what she likes to read, and we talk about books, and I'm not worried about anything else.

DrDoofenshmirtz
by Silver Member on Jul. 2, 2014 at 10:33 PM

He is young.  Reading does not click with all kids at that age.  My daughter loved Starfall.com and the online program Reading Eggs at that age.  Reading Eggs is great in that there is a lot of repetition and there is a mix of phonics and sight words.  You can sign up for a free promo and then buy it from there. 

http://readingeggs.com/

 

soymujer
by Mikki on Jul. 2, 2014 at 11:11 PM

I would just keep doing what you are doing and read with him. 

family in the van   Mom of four


IQuitCounting
by Member on Jul. 2, 2014 at 11:26 PM

I agree with this.  It's ridiculous what they are expecting of kids these days, and they focus on text book learning in Kinder when it use to focus on learning through play...

Read to him, work with him, but don't stress him out about it.  If you make this into a chore he may give up before he even starts!  Find books he wants to read.  Even comic books are a great starter.  My son loves them and I encourage them because typically the reading is minimal and highly backed up by the imagery, so that can help.  Take him to the library and have him choose, make a trip out of it once a week to pick up new books.  Kids learn through being engaged, you don't have to be a teacher, just read to him, talk to him about.  I'll bet he'll be just fine.

Quoting clairewait:

He's still pretty young. I know public school is getting a little out of control on making milestones and hitting benchmarks, but boys tend to move at slower rates than girls, on average - and many who are "flagged" as strugglers in the early early years turn out just fine.

At this point, I think the best thing you can do is read to him, read with him, and read around him. I was a HS English teacher for several years, but actually majored in elementary ed. The most important thing, in my opinion, is interest in reading. Take off the pressure of being good at it. Help him to enjoy it.

We have never been a big TV or computer family (at least not with our kids) and have always had a pretty natural reading culture in our home. I have no idea where my 2nd grader is in comparison to her peers, but I do know what she likes to read, and we talk about books, and I'm not worried about anything else.


catngabsmom
by Member on Jul. 2, 2014 at 11:36 PM

I agree with this also!!! 

My advice, is to read, read, read and read!! Read to him, have him read to you and have fun with words, letters, sounds, sound patterns  and worry less about the sounding out of the words and more about how fluid it sounds when he reads them. If he is reading a sentence, and the sentence sounds choppy to him because he had to keep stopping to sound out the words, then he will not retain and comprehend what the passage was about, but if he reads a sentence all the way through with minimal stoppage, he will increase his literacy skills and comprehension skills. When he gets stuck at a word, help him learn the word, its sounds, its meaning and its pronunication, then have him start at the beginning of the sentence and get his mouth ready to say that word when it comes, so that he reads the sentence all the way through without a pause. 

Quoting IQuitCounting:

I agree with this.  It's ridiculous what they are expecting of kids these days, and they focus on text book learning in Kinder when it use to focus on learning through play...

Read to him, work with him, but don't stress him out about it.  If you make this into a chore he may give up before he even starts!  Find books he wants to read.  Even comic books are a great starter.  My son loves them and I encourage them because typically the reading is minimal and highly backed up by the imagery, so that can help.  Take him to the library and have him choose, make a trip out of it once a week to pick up new books.  Kids learn through being engaged, you don't have to be a teacher, just read to him, talk to him about.  I'll bet he'll be just fine.

Quoting clairewait:

He's still pretty young. I know public school is getting a little out of control on making milestones and hitting benchmarks, but boys tend to move at slower rates than girls, on average - and many who are "flagged" as strugglers in the early early years turn out just fine.

At this point, I think the best thing you can do is read to him, read with him, and read around him. I was a HS English teacher for several years, but actually majored in elementary ed. The most important thing, in my opinion, is interest in reading. Take off the pressure of being good at it. Help him to enjoy it.

We have never been a big TV or computer family (at least not with our kids) and have always had a pretty natural reading culture in our home. I have no idea where my 2nd grader is in comparison to her peers, but I do know what she likes to read, and we talk about books, and I'm not worried about anything else.


Erica


Mom to
Caterina-12.75
Gabriella-11.25
JanetteA
by Bronze Member on Jul. 3, 2014 at 2:01 AM
2 moms liked this

Well, I'm going to disagree with the other posters.

It's true that that for many kids reading is developmental, and it may be that reading will just kick in one day.  But kids who can tell you every sound in a word but can't "put it together" often have learning disabilities.  And the fact that your son couldn't remember the word FAST when he had just sounded it out suggests he might have short term memory issues. 

Here's my super-quick down-and-dirty test for learning disabilities in kindergarteners.  I'm no expert, but maybe it will give you some guidance.  (These are all skills that most  kids your son's age should be able to do almost instinctively-- they need no adult help whatsoever to do the task.)

1.  Can your son sing "Happy Birthday" or "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" all the way through without a mistake?  (Don't automatically say yes-- ask him to do it.)

2.  Can your son give you three words that rhyme with CAKE?  How about words that rhyme with SKIP?

3.  Has your son ever had speech therapy?

4.  Can your son skip or pedal a bike/trike?  (Crossing the midline)

5. If you give your child a sequence of 5 items (like AQ73F), can he repeat them right back to you? (short term memory)

6.  If you give your child a word like PIN, can he tell you what word he'd have if he replaced the P with a T?  What about if the N is replaced with a M?  Can he hear the difference between PAT, PET, PIT, POT and PUT when they are not in a sentence?

If your child can do all those things, chances are any lags are just developmental.  But if any of those tasks are difficult, you should definitely have him tested for LDs. 

ANd by the way-- if your child does have LDs, you can read several books to him every night and it will not help him read any better, What he will need is a specific sensory-based reading curriculum (like Orton-Gillingham or one of the curriculums based on Orton-Gillingham).  And the sooner you get started,the better.

 

 

 

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