• In the Spotlight:
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

any experience with the kindergarten literacy assessment?

Posted by on Nov. 4, 2014 at 9:19 PM
  • 15 Replies
How many times is it taken in the year? Is it more advanced each time once they pass once or once they pass, they pass?

Dds teacher said dd must get a level b on it to get an s in reading and ela. Apparently report cards (given yesterday) were based on the assessment taken the 1st wk of school. They will be retesting next wk and she expects dd to pass. It just seems late too me.

Is the entire assessment just what they need to know by the end of kindergarten?

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
by on Nov. 4, 2014 at 9:19 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
JanetteA
by Bronze Member on Nov. 4, 2014 at 10:27 PM

Every school does assessments differently.  Do you know the name of the assessment used?

Ilaynasmommy
by Member on Nov. 4, 2014 at 10:30 PM
She just calls it a literacy assesment.

They took it the second week of school and we didnt even get the results until progress reports.

She said they have to read most of the words of a story and tell about the story without looking back.

Quoting JanetteA:

Every school does assessments differently.  Do you know the name of the assessment used?

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
jenniferw10
by on Nov. 4, 2014 at 10:42 PM
That seems like a lot for the beginning of the school year for kindergarten. The kindergarten students here are learning the letter sounds and how to write them. By the end of the school year the kindergarten students have to be able to write three sentences.

Quoting Ilaynasmommy: She just calls it a literacy assesment.

They took it the second week of school and we didnt even get the results until progress reports.

She said they have to read most of the words of a story and tell about the story without looking back.

Quoting JanetteA:

Every school does assessments differently.  Do you know the name of the assessment used?

Ilaynasmommy
by Member on Nov. 4, 2014 at 11:40 PM
When I question why ilayna recieved ns on the progress report im told she is right on track and it is because of that assessm3nt nbut she is progressing well.

Last week she had an assignment to fill in blanks.... it was "I like __smartes__ because they are __yumme__. It shocked me lol. She spelt "girl" as "gurl." She recieved an n in wrting also.

Quoting jenniferw10: That seems like a lot for the beginning of the school year for kindergarten. The kindergarten students here are learning the letter sounds and how to write them. By the end of the school year the kindergarten students have to be able to write three sentences.

Quoting Ilaynasmommy: She just calls it a literacy assesment.

They took it the second week of school and we didnt even get the results until progress reports.

She said they have to read most of the words of a story and tell about the story without looking back.

Quoting JanetteA:

Every school does assessments differently.  Do you know the name of the assessment used?

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
JanetteA
by Bronze Member on Nov. 5, 2014 at 12:16 AM

Something here isn't adding up.  Either you are misunderstanding or the teacher is trying to placate you.

The fill-in-the-blank assignment you described is pretty typical stuff.  And typically kindergarteners are encouraged to write words the way they hear them.  Kindergarteners are rarely if ever graded on spelling.

Not only that, kindergarteners are not graded on assessments.  They just aren't.  Otherwise every kid who waltzed in without a firm handle on the ABCs would get failing grades right from the start. 

The fact that your child received an N is very concerning to me.  Teachers just don't give Ns to kindergarteners.  That's equivalent to failing, and teachers just don't fail kindergarteners.  It would kill any enthusiasm they had for school practically before their education began.

I do not know, but I suspect that perhaps your daughter is very far behind but the teacher doesn't want to come out and tell you that.  You imply that your DD hasn't attained a level B,  which I assume is the leveled reading program your school uses.  That means your kid is still at level A, which is absolute 100% beginning.  Most kids are well beyond that level on the very first day of school.

Not only that, the verbage the teacher is using is the same thing teachers used to tell me about my son.  "He's such a helpful young man,"  "I'm not worried," "I don't look at where they are now-- I look for growth,"  "So much of reading is developmental-- suddenly a light bulb just goes off," and my personal favorite, "He's right where he needs to be."  I heard them all, and it turned out they were all platitudes designed to keep a pushy mother (me!) at bay.   

If I were you, I would demand to see these assessments and get an line-by-line explanation of what each means.  Also I would ask some very pointed questions about how your DD"s reading compares to that of the rest of the class.  And if you find out that your DD is at or near the bottom of the class, you need to insist on a written plan to get her up to speed.  Good luck.






Andrewsmom70
by Gold Member on Nov. 5, 2014 at 1:16 AM
I'm not sure how you got all that from the little information she provided.



Quoting JanetteA:

Something here isn't adding up.  Either you are misunderstanding or the teacher is trying to placate you.

The fill-in-the-blank assignment you described is pretty typical stuff.  And typically kindergarteners are encouraged to write words the way they hear them.  Kindergarteners are rarely if ever graded on spelling.

Not only that, kindergarteners are not graded on assessments.  They just aren't.  Otherwise every kid who waltzed in without a firm handle on the ABCs would get failing grades right from the start. 

The fact that your child received an N is very concerning to me.  Teachers just don't give Ns to kindergarteners.  That's equivalent to failing, and teachers just don't fail kindergarteners.  It would kill any enthusiasm they had for school practically before their education began.

I do not know, but I suspect that perhaps your daughter is very far behind but the teacher doesn't want to come out and tell you that.  You imply that your DD hasn't attained a level B,  which I assume is the leveled reading program your school uses.  That means your kid is still at level A, which is absolute 100% beginning.  Most kids are well beyond that level on the very first day of school.

Not only that, the verbage the teacher is using is the same thing teachers used to tell me about my son.  "He's such a helpful young man,"  "I'm not worried," "I don't look at where they are now-- I look for growth,"  "So much of reading is developmental-- suddenly a light bulb just goes off," and my personal favorite, "He's right where he needs to be."  I heard them all, and it turned out they were all platitudes designed to keep a pushy mother (me!) at bay.   

If I were you, I would demand to see these assessments and get an line-by-line explanation of what each means.  Also I would ask some very pointed questions about how your DD"s reading compares to that of the rest of the class.  And if you find out that your DD is at or near the bottom of the class, you need to insist on a written plan to get her up to speed.  Good luck.

Ilaynasmommy
by Member on Nov. 5, 2014 at 6:46 AM
She is not behind. She is sounding words out fully.

My neighbor, in the same class, also recieved an n. When i questioned it, she said a u is behind.

She gave me a sheet of every letter, sound, number, and sight word they have learned this year. There were two that ilayna hadnt mastered. She said she loves that she can count on ilayna to get it right when asked. And ilayna has been known to help other kids struggling.

I sent another letter asking what i asked in here.

Quoting JanetteA:

Something here isn't adding up.  Either you are misunderstanding or the teacher is trying to placate you.

The fill-in-the-blank assignment you described is pretty typical stuff.  And typically kindergarteners are encouraged to write words the way they hear them.  Kindergarteners are rarely if ever graded on spelling.

Not only that, kindergarteners are not graded on assessments.  They just aren't.  Otherwise every kid who waltzed in without a firm handle on the ABCs would get failing grades right from the start. 

The fact that your child received an N is very concerning to me.  Teachers just don't give Ns to kindergarteners.  That's equivalent to failing, and teachers just don't fail kindergarteners.  It would kill any enthusiasm they had for school practically before their education began.

I do not know, but I suspect that perhaps your daughter is very far behind but the teacher doesn't want to come out and tell you that.  You imply that your DD hasn't attained a level B,  which I assume is the leveled reading program your school uses.  That means your kid is still at level A, which is absolute 100% beginning.  Most kids are well beyond that level on the very first day of school.

Not only that, the verbage the teacher is using is the same thing teachers used to tell me about my son.  "He's such a helpful young man,"  "I'm not worried," "I don't look at where they are now-- I look for growth,"  "So much of reading is developmental-- suddenly a light bulb just goes off," and my personal favorite, "He's right where he needs to be."  I heard them all, and it turned out they were all platitudes designed to keep a pushy mother (me!) at bay.   

If I were you, I would demand to see these assessments and get an line-by-line explanation of what each means.  Also I would ask some very pointed questions about how your DD"s reading compares to that of the rest of the class.  And if you find out that your DD is at or near the bottom of the class, you need to insist on a written plan to get her up to speed.  Good luck.

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
wakymom
by Ruby Member on Nov. 5, 2014 at 8:41 AM
1 mom liked this

 If I remember correctly, my kids were assessed more than once throughout the year to see how they had progressed and to make sure they were being assigned books on the correct level for them. The teachers want the kids to improve and become better readers, and they cannot see if that is happening if they do not re-assess them periodically.

 

 

 

Jubileee
by on Nov. 5, 2014 at 8:57 AM

Mobile Photo

This is my DD's. She is in Kindergarten.

They also do accelerated reading. She averages 2-3 books a week she reads and tests on.
MamaLauri
by Member on Nov. 5, 2014 at 9:05 AM

You should not worry. If she has challenges areas provide her support in those areas.

http://www.4mylearn.org/Bookshelf/Phonics/html/IcanELAK.html provide the Common Core Kindergarten English Language Arts "Ican"s that your child should be able to agree to and demonstrate by the end of the year. Right now we are 25-30% through the year, so if she can do roughly 20% that is good. She also should have some ability for at least the first 3 Reading Critical Thinking "I CAN" statements (http://www.4mylearn.org/Bookshelf/Phonics/html/IcanELA-CritThink.html ).

If you feel she needs additional support,try:

http://www.4mylearn.org/Bookshelf/Phonics/lessons/Kind/0PhonicsK.html, a full multi-sensory Kindergarten English Language Arts program for visual and kinetic learners (including kids with dyslexia, ADHD, ASD and other labels). Click on one of the units to see the kids page. 

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)