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Advice Needed: My almost 7yr old flips out when he tries a...

Posted by on Apr. 5, 2015 at 7:50 PM
  • 22 Replies

My almost 7yr old flips out when he tries a new food. First he cries & cries about trying it then because he is so worked up after trying a bite he says hes gonna b sick then goes & sits in the bathroom. Idk what to do anymore for him. Can anyone help please?

by on Apr. 5, 2015 at 7:50 PM
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Jinx-Troublex3
by Platinum Member on Apr. 5, 2015 at 7:54 PM
2 moms liked this
Have him help you cook. Explore the store and let him pick things out. Use creative or fun names.

We have a rule thqt you may decline something once. The next time it is offered, you must try a bite. You must chew it at least 3-4 times and may spit it politely into a napkin if to don't like it.

As for the drama, there would be consequences for that behavior.
Hannahluvsdogs
by Silver Member on Apr. 5, 2015 at 8:06 PM

Is he special needs?

SarahSuzyQ
by Sarah on Apr. 5, 2015 at 8:43 PM
I think all of this is solid advice. I would also add that they make cookbooks for kids, and you can usually find all kinds of themes. My 7yo got a cookbook for Christmas that has several whole meal ideas in it, and the dishes are realistic for kids this age to prepare with adult supervision. Getting him involved in the process could make a huge difference in his attitude.

Helping him learn appropriate ways to express distaste, apprehension, or whatever is going on is also a good idea. Behaving in this fashion would not be OK at my house either, and we do work with DS to identify the root of the behavior and how he can appropriately express himself in difficult situations.

Quoting Jinx-Troublex3: Have him help you cook. Explore the store and let him pick things out. Use creative or fun names.

We have a rule thqt you may decline something once. The next time it is offered, you must try a bite. You must chew it at least 3-4 times and may spit it politely into a napkin if to don't like it.

As for the drama, there would be consequences for that behavior.
Adipose3
by on Apr. 5, 2015 at 9:06 PM

no not special needs. i have tried dealing with his behaviour all different ways from grounding, time outs, taking away treats. the meal i made tonight was mozz cheese, chicken, tomatoes & shell noodles. he got all worked up worried about how the tomatoe would taste. i told him he only needed to try it, if he didn't like it then that was fine but he had to try it. he's done this b4. we've tried making a sheet with things he tries & writes down comments about it. that worked for a couple times but he just refuses to try new stuff.

steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Apr. 5, 2015 at 9:18 PM

It sounds like he may have a little bit of anxiety over trying new foods.  He needs to learn how to control that anxiety and there are many different coping skills out there.  Taking deep breaths, counting to 10 slowly, and squeezing a stress ball are some of the most common.  Basically when he begins to get upset over trying a new food, help him use a coping skill to calm himself down, praise him for calming down, and then attempt to try the new food again.  If he can't calm down, or refuses to calm down/try the new food then proceed with discipline.

At a time when he is calm and not being faced with a new food, talk about what he is most afraid of when trying a new food.  Then work out what he should do if that fear happens.  If the fear is not liking the taste of the new food, show him how to politely spit it into a napkin and take a drink to get the taste out of his mouth.  If it is vomiting, maybe you could keep a small bucket and towel beside his seat at the table.  Then prior to trying a new food, remind him of what he can do to ease that fear.

jaydensmom1726
by Member on Apr. 5, 2015 at 9:33 PM
1 mom liked this

It could be a sensory issue with certain textures

coolmommy2x
by Platinum Member on Apr. 5, 2015 at 10:53 PM
I would take him to a psychologist who specializes in food issues. My niece was referred to one but my brother and SIL insisted she was fine. Then it got worse and I believe she has a full on eating disorder. They finally took her to a therapist after the mom of a friend told my SIL she was concerned about some things my niece had said. They haven't gotten to the food issue yet but at least theygot her into therapy.
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PoplarGrove
by on Apr. 5, 2015 at 11:16 PM
2 moms liked this

They say when introducing a new food to a child it can take up to 7 times of putting it on the plate before the child will try it.  Are you making it an issue that he try the new food?  If so stop.  You're obviously causing him intense anxiety over the whole issue.  Put it on his plate and leave him to it.  If he tries it, great, if he doesn't the world is not going to come crashing down on anyone.  

Control issues over food are one of the largest causes of eating disorders.  Eating disorders aren't about food, they're about control.  So are anxiety attacks.  He's having an anxiety attack because he has no control over whether he will eat the food or not.  

GleekingOut
by Bronze Member on Apr. 6, 2015 at 3:58 AM

Honestly? I've never allowed the bathroom trips immediately after trying something new. Those I feel are for attention. I have a daughter with severe anxiety, and unless she is literally gagging at the table (which rarely  happened) she had to stay at the table while we all ate our dinner. More often than not, she would calm down and try a little bit more of the food, and then either like it, or eat around it. If she didn't like it; she was forced to clean up the kitchen with her dad then go straight to bed. I honestly think your son might benifiet from some imput over what you are cooking for dinner and what he likes/how he likes things cooked.

Bluecalm
by Member on Apr. 6, 2015 at 7:05 AM
1 mom liked this
Am I reading this right? She's punished for not liking a food?

Quoting GleekingOut:

Honestly? I've never allowed the bathroom trips immediately after trying something new. Those I feel are for attention. I have a daughter with severe anxiety, and unless she is literally gagging at the table (which rarely  happened) she had to stay at the table while we all ate our dinner. More often than not, she would calm down and try a little bit more of the food, and then either like it, or eat around it. If she didn't like it; she was forced to clean up the kitchen with her dad then go straight to bed. I honestly think your son might benifiet from some imput over what you are cooking for dinner and what he likes/how he likes things cooked.

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