Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Summer Bridge Activities?

Posted by on May. 17, 2015 at 9:37 AM
  • 19 Replies
What would you have a second grader going into third grade do over the summer to prepare for third?
A). A Summer Bridging workbook (there are several).
B). Nothing
C). Read
Anything else?

One summer (and I regret this), she did no reading over the summer-it was K to 1st, and her reading level actually dropped. I had read to her, but she needed to be doing it!!!!

She likes to read now, though, and is sitting there doing so as I type!
by on May. 17, 2015 at 9:37 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on May. 17, 2015 at 9:47 AM

I have always had my boys read over the summer and no other formal schooling.  I detest workbooks and if my boys were struggling with math, or any other subject for that matter, I'd find other ways to build lessons into every day life.  Math, science, and history are all around you, all you have to do is look.

Impressionists
by Silver Member on May. 17, 2015 at 9:58 AM
I have some 1st to 2nd bridging books from last year that are half finished. The second half will be a good review of second to do from time to time. I'm a worksheet-kind-of-mom. Lol.

We take road trips, which usually involve a lot of learning, and there are still a few museums in our city we haven't visited (and others to revisit). I'm afraid I'm not very good at coming up with impromptu lessons myself.

Quoting steelcrazy:

I have always had my boys read over the summer and no other formal schooling.  I detest workbooks and if my boys were struggling with math, or any other subject for that matter, I'd find other ways to build lessons into every day life.  Math, science, and history are all around you, all you have to do is look.

steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on May. 17, 2015 at 10:14 AM

Some times you have to go old school to make learning possible.  A Rand McNally Road Atlas is a must have.  Prior to going on a road trip, toss the road atlas at the spawn and have them figure out how many miles it is from home to your destination.  What major roads you could take.  How long it would take to drive there without stopping.  Are there any land marks along the way.

Just thought of another fun learning activity that we do sometimes when traveling through several states.  Have the kids look up information on all of the states that you will be traveling through - capital city, governor, state bird, flower, motto, etc.  

Prior to departure I will print out travel directions from google maps to give to each of the rug rats.  They use the print out to mark off our progress.  Not only does it help them learn about reading road signs, it also keeps the "are we there yet" whines at bay because they know how far they have gone and how much further they have to go.  You could do the same thing with the gps on their electronic device, but that doesn't require them to be interactive and it doesn't really teach a lesson like an old fashioned map does.

Museums are easy peasy.  If you come out of a museum and didn't learn anything new, you must not have been actively paying attention to what you were seeing and doing.  We talk about what we are seeing all through museums.  We read everything on the displays and discuss it.  If there is something that the little ones want to know and I don't have the answer, then I pull out the phone and google it.

IMO, it is important to know when to pull out that modern technology and when to put it away and rely on "relics" from the past to help them learn a lesson.  Technology isn't always the best when you are teaching children.

Quoting Impressionists: I have some 1st to 2nd bridging books from last year that are half finished. The second half will be a good review of second to do from time to time. I'm a worksheet-kind-of-mom. Lol. We take road trips, which usually involve a lot of learning, and there are still a few museums in our city we haven't visited (and others to revisit). I'm afraid I'm not very good at coming up with impromptu lessons myself.
Quoting steelcrazy:

I have always had my boys read over the summer and no other formal schooling.  I detest workbooks and if my boys were struggling with math, or any other subject for that matter, I'd find other ways to build lessons into every day life.  Math, science, and history are all around you, all you have to do is look.


Impressionists
by Silver Member on May. 17, 2015 at 10:25 AM
Ha ha. Last year we took three days to go to Florida and two days back. Dd wants to drive straight through this year. She keeps asking how long it will take...missed learning moment, as I told her. Not sure if she'll be receptive to map learning with mommy, but I'll try.

Quoting steelcrazy:

Some times you have to go old school to make learning possible.  A Rand McNally Road Atlas is a must have.  Prior to going on a road trip, toss the road atlas at the spawn and have them figure out how many miles it is from home to your destination.  What major roads you could take.  How long it would take to drive there without stopping.  Are there any land marks along the way.

Just thought of another fun learning activity that we do sometimes when traveling through several states.  Have the kids look up information on all of the states that you will be traveling through - capital city, governor, state bird, flower, motto, etc.  

Prior to departure I will print out travel directions from google maps to give to each of the rug rats.  They use the print out to mark off our progress.  Not only does it help them learn about reading road signs, it also keeps the "are we there yet" whines at bay because they know how far they have gone and how much further they have to go.  You could do the same thing with the gps on their electronic device, but that doesn't require them to be interactive and it doesn't really teach a lesson like an old fashioned map does.

Museums are easy peasy.  If you come out of a museum and didn't learn anything new, you must not have been actively paying attention to what you were seeing and doing.  We talk about what we are seeing all through museums.  We read everything on the displays and discuss it.  If there is something that the little ones want to know and I don't have the answer, then I pull out the phone and google it.

IMO, it is important to know when to pull out that modern technology and when to put it away and rely on "relics" from the past to help them learn a lesson.  Technology isn't always the best when you are teaching children.

Quoting Impressionists: I have some 1st to 2nd bridging books from last year that are half finished. The second half will be a good review of second to do from time to time. I'm a worksheet-kind-of-mom. Lol.

We take road trips, which usually involve a lot of learning, and there are still a few museums in our city we haven't visited (and others to revisit). I'm afraid I'm not very good at coming up with impromptu lessons myself.

Quoting steelcrazy:

I have always had my boys read over the summer and no other formal schooling.  I detest workbooks and if my boys were struggling with math, or any other subject for that matter, I'd find other ways to build lessons into every day life.  Math, science, and history are all around you, all you have to do is look.

maxswolfsuit
by Max on May. 17, 2015 at 10:28 AM

Read

Summer workbooks are seldom helpful. Especially with the curriculum changes that have happened all over the country. I would be very surprised to find a summer workbook that does a good job offering practice for the new standards. 

The other thing I will do with my son is have him keep a journal to practice writing daily. I won't give him assignments, but I do want him to write a few sentences at least daily. 

We will also use a couple of educational aps to practice math facts and sight words. 

Impressionists
by Silver Member on May. 17, 2015 at 10:36 AM
My daughter's memory is a little like mine (it needs reinforcement). That's why we use the workbooks mostly, not for new learning. We butt heads a little when I act like a teacher. 😀 we do need to study facts. I have a workbook for that. lol. It's 2+2 is not 5. I can't find an app for facts that I like.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Read

Summer workbooks are seldom helpful. Especially with the curriculum changes that have happened all over the country. I would be very surprised to find a summer workbook that does a good job offering practice for the new standards. 

The other thing I will do with my son is have him keep a journal to practice writing daily. I won't give him assignments, but I do want him to write a few sentences at least daily. 

We will also use a couple of educational aps to practice math facts and sight words. 

Impressionists
by Silver Member on May. 17, 2015 at 10:38 AM
She likes to write. Good idea.

Quoting Impressionists: My daughter's memory is a little like mine (it needs reinforcement). That's why we use the workbooks mostly, not for new learning. We butt heads a little when I act like a teacher. 😀 we do need to study facts. I have a workbook for that. lol. It's 2+2 is not 5. I can't find an app for facts that I like.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Read

Summer workbooks are seldom helpful. Especially with the curriculum changes that have happened all over the country. I would be very surprised to find a summer workbook that does a good job offering practice for the new standards. 

The other thing I will do with my son is have him keep a journal to practice writing daily. I won't give him assignments, but I do want him to write a few sentences at least daily. 

We will also use a couple of educational aps to practice math facts and sight words. 

matofour
by on May. 17, 2015 at 10:51 AM
Read read read
It's very very common for reading levels to drop during the summer.
Workbooks are boring and rarely teach anything.
Bluecalm
by Member on May. 17, 2015 at 11:36 AM
Read for sure. Does your library have a summer reading program? I'd also suggest practicing her math facts. I don't see anything wrong with her doing workbooks if she enjoys them.
othermom
by Silver Member on May. 17, 2015 at 11:48 AM

We have a pile of workbooks that the kids do over the summer, usually for fun because they like to. They read atleast 30 minutes a day most days. There are a few online sites  that they like as well

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)