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Attitude

Posted by on Jan. 31, 2016 at 10:18 PM
  • 24 Replies
1 mom liked this
My older boy who will be 9 in June has gotten the worst attitude over the last 8 months or so. It just keeps getting worse and worse.

Does anyone have ideas or things that worked to snap their kids out of attitude and selfish behaviors?

Thanks!

Kate
by on Jan. 31, 2016 at 10:18 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Homealonex2
by Bronze Member on Feb. 1, 2016 at 3:19 AM
1 mom liked this
I think this must be an age thing. My son is the same age and we just stared having these problems. We have a reward system in place where if he choses apprioate behavior and does his chore he earns baseball and Wrestling trading cards. I think the key is to remain consistance on rules and expectations. It could also be a change in hormones this is about the age my dd started having behavioral isuess as well.
Linda_Runs
by Silver Member on Feb. 1, 2016 at 7:49 AM

Well holy smokes, I could have written this post as well.

My older daughter is 10 and is just coming out of the worst year (2015) imaginable for attitude.  The  attitude, backtalk, defiance and other issues were harsh.  In 2016, so far, so good!

To my chagrin, my other daughter who is 8 is just starting.  Can I survive another year?  Or should I say, can she survive it!

Linda_Runs
by Silver Member on Feb. 1, 2016 at 8:06 AM

Here is a couple of funny cards on attitude I had:


steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Feb. 1, 2016 at 8:16 AM
1 mom liked this

Welcome to the wonderful world of puberty.  Buckle up, it's going to be a bumpy ride.

All I can say is choose your battles wisely and try to give him a little more say in things that don't really have an impact on his health and safety.  Long hair?  Sure.  All black clothing?  No problem.  Skipping breakfast?  I don't think so.

Routine and consistancy also helps at this age, but keep it slightly looser than you did in the younger years.  Once you get this, that and the next thing done, then you can have some electronics time.  I have a friend who changes her wifi password daily and only hands it out once the kid gets done what is expected of him.  I honestly don't have the inclination to change my wifi password daily, but if it works . . .

mom2jessnky
by Platinum Member on Feb. 1, 2016 at 8:26 AM
2 moms liked this

I agree, pick your battles.

I don't even know how to change my wifi password. LOL.  It would be much easier for your friend to just put a passcode on everything and not unlock it until x,y,z were done.

Quoting steelcrazy:

Welcome to the wonderful world of puberty.  Buckle up, it's going to be a bumpy ride.

All I can say is choose your battles wisely and try to give him a little more say in things that don't really have an impact on his health and safety.  Long hair?  Sure.  All black clothing?  No problem.  Skipping breakfast?  I don't think so.

Routine and consistancy also helps at this age, but keep it slightly looser than you did in the younger years.  Once you get this, that and the next thing done, then you can have some electronics time.  I have a friend who changes her wifi password daily and only hands it out once the kid gets done what is expected of him.  I honestly don't have the inclination to change my wifi password daily, but if it works . . .


steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Feb. 1, 2016 at 8:29 AM

Seriously!  It drives me effin insane!  Every time that I go over there she is fighting with her 17 year old over the darn wifi password.  He'll insist that he needs it for a school assignment and will get to his chores after the assignment is done.  Uh huh.  Sure buddy.  We obviously parent in entirely different ways.

Quoting mom2jessnky:

I agree, pick your battles.

I don't even know how to change my wifi password. LOL.  It would be much easier for your friend to just put a passcode on everything and not unlock it until x,y,z were done.

Quoting steelcrazy:

Welcome to the wonderful world of puberty.  Buckle up, it's going to be a bumpy ride.

All I can say is choose your battles wisely and try to give him a little more say in things that don't really have an impact on his health and safety.  Long hair?  Sure.  All black clothing?  No problem.  Skipping breakfast?  I don't think so.

Routine and consistancy also helps at this age, but keep it slightly looser than you did in the younger years.  Once you get this, that and the next thing done, then you can have some electronics time.  I have a friend who changes her wifi password daily and only hands it out once the kid gets done what is expected of him.  I honestly don't have the inclination to change my wifi password daily, but if it works . . .


Linda_Runs
by Silver Member on Feb. 1, 2016 at 9:00 AM

I also agree about picking battles and the wifi password.  To change that means I have to change every wireless device in the house.  Nope.  My kids are only 8 and 10, so when I say no internet, I mean no internet.  If they are found using it, there are consequences.

I will see how that works as they get into their teens.  Thankfully that is a few years away yet!

Steelcrazy is quite correct; consistency and routine are a parent's friend.

Quoting mom2jessnky:

I agree, pick your battles.

I don't even know how to change my wifi password. LOL.  It would be much easier for your friend to just put a passcode on everything and not unlock it until x,y,z were done.

Quoting steelcrazy:

Welcome to the wonderful world of puberty.  Buckle up, it's going to be a bumpy ride.

All I can say is choose your battles wisely and try to give him a little more say in things that don't really have an impact on his health and safety.  Long hair?  Sure.  All black clothing?  No problem.  Skipping breakfast?  I don't think so.

Routine and consistancy also helps at this age, but keep it slightly looser than you did in the younger years.  Once you get this, that and the next thing done, then you can have some electronics time.  I have a friend who changes her wifi password daily and only hands it out once the kid gets done what is expected of him.  I honestly don't have the inclination to change my wifi password daily, but if it works . . .


mom2jessnky
by Platinum Member on Feb. 1, 2016 at 9:27 AM
3 moms liked this

I have a teen, it's pretty simple to keep her off the internet if I want too. All of her devices are portable. I would simply take away the ipad, phone, and laptop. Or if it were that serious, unplug the damn modem, that power cord is removable.

Quoting Linda_Runs:

I also agree about picking battles and the wifi password.  To change that means I have to change every wireless device in the house.  Nope.  My kids are only 8 and 10, so when I say no internet, I mean no internet.  If they are found using it, there are consequences.

I will see how that works as they get into their teens.  Thankfully that is a few years away yet!

Steelcrazy is quite correct; consistency and routine are a parent's friend.

Quoting mom2jessnky:

I agree, pick your battles.

I don't even know how to change my wifi password. LOL.  It would be much easier for your friend to just put a passcode on everything and not unlock it until x,y,z were done.

Quoting steelcrazy:

Welcome to the wonderful world of puberty.  Buckle up, it's going to be a bumpy ride.

All I can say is choose your battles wisely and try to give him a little more say in things that don't really have an impact on his health and safety.  Long hair?  Sure.  All black clothing?  No problem.  Skipping breakfast?  I don't think so.

Routine and consistancy also helps at this age, but keep it slightly looser than you did in the younger years.  Once you get this, that and the next thing done, then you can have some electronics time.  I have a friend who changes her wifi password daily and only hands it out once the kid gets done what is expected of him.  I honestly don't have the inclination to change my wifi password daily, but if it works . . .


wakymom
by Ruby Member on Feb. 1, 2016 at 5:44 PM

So funny, and so true!

Quoting Linda_Runs:

Here is a couple of funny cards on attitude I had:





wakymom
by Ruby Member on Feb. 1, 2016 at 5:50 PM

What I have found helps, besides being consistent and picking my battles, is deciding how much "attitude" I can live with. I came to the conclusion that I can live with some eye rolling and muttering/grumbling under their breath as long as they do what they are told/asked to and are not being flat-out disrespectful with the grumbling. I see it as win-win: they get to express their displeasure and I get them doing whatever household task was assigned.




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