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9-Year-Old Girl Completes Navy SEALs Obstacle Course

Posted by on Mar. 30, 2016 at 11:32 AM
  • 12 Replies

9-Year-Old Girl Who Completed Navy SEALs Obstacle Course Is Your New Hero

9-Year-old Milla Bizzotto is the youngest competitor in a challenging Navy SEALs obstacle

"And a child shall lead them." Though young in age, children have the ability to influence a generation -- and that's exactly what Milla Bizzotto aims to do. This 9-year-old girl completed a Navy SEALs obstacle course to prove that you can achieve anything you set your mind to, regardless of naysayers and bullies.

Milla was the only competitor under age 18 at the BattleFrong Xtreme 24-hour race in Miami earlier this month. (She received special permission to participate.) And, just to give you a little taste of what this 9-year-old girl did, try to picture yourself doing the following: swinging from ropes, swimming, climbing, running, and completing laps that totaled about 30 miles.

#GirlBoss

Yeah, Milla wasn't playing around.

While some are likely shaking their heads at Milla (and her parents) for taking on such a challenge, this third grader refuses to slow down. In fact, Milla's message to kids her age is just as powerful as her ability to clean and jerk. (If you do CrossFit, you understood that.)

As Milla says in this amazing YouTube clip, "I can inspire a generation. I will inspire a generation."


Milla also adds:

I wanted to inspire kids to get off the couch and show that they have a special [quality] inside of them, and tell the people who don't believe in them who they really are.

Come on, you can't help but root for this girl!

What makes Milla's story even more amazing is not just her desire to reach her personal goals or encourage her peers to get active. Milla experienced bullying that could've dimmed her light as it sadly does to so many victims. And yet, that's what this young lady used as a catalyst to compete in fitness games and obstacle courses.

"I want to inspire a generation. I don't get bullied anymore. I know how to stand up for myself now. And I love what I do. I want to do it forever," Milla told the Miami Herald.

Awesome.

As a self-professed "gym rat" myself, I am in awe of Milla and her story. Sure, there are folks who have nothing but criticism for her parents, but it's Milla who wants to be this active. Seeing as her father is a personal trainer and gym owner -- and Milla sees a doctor on the regular who monitors her progress -- I think it's great how this young girl doesn't want to sit in front of a TV, as so many people do today.

Plus, Milla is creating an amazing platform that combats bullying and is teaching children her own age to reach for the stars and do the impossible. In fact, Milla is proving that the "impossible" is actually very possible to achieve (with hard work, of course).

Rock on, Milla.

Do your kids enjoy physical activity?

by on Mar. 30, 2016 at 11:32 AM
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Replies (1-10):
mom2jessnky
by Platinum Member on Mar. 30, 2016 at 11:40 AM
3 moms liked this

I saw this on Facebook, and I'm really bothered by the title.

It should be our new hero, our as in the writer and the mouse in her pocket. Like do people really get to dictate who other people's heroes are?


Maybe I'm just in a bad mood from a long, weird shift at work last night, but uhm...no that kid is NOT my hero just because she did some obstacle course. Come talk to me when she finds a cure for Lupus or something.

2-point-doe
by Silver Member on Mar. 30, 2016 at 4:14 PM
1 mom liked this

I agree. I am not sure it is really healthy for a child either. Seriously running 30 miles and doing the rest? Don't they have the age limits in place for a reason?

DD is always in perpetual motion. She currently participates in karate.

steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Mar. 30, 2016 at 6:34 PM
1 mom liked this

Yes, both of my boys are active and enjoy physical activity.

FTR - bullying doesn't ever cause suicide, mental illness does.

lizzig
by Silver Member on Mar. 31, 2016 at 6:56 PM

wow!  that's crazy!!

my 8yr old son is a competetive gymnast & is at the gym 9 1/2hrs a week.  don't see him doing what that girl did.  don't think i'd give him permission for such even if he wanted to.

EarlGrayHot
by on Apr. 1, 2016 at 1:56 PM

Yeah, too much for one so young.  I could harm her.

Sebbiemama
by Member on Apr. 1, 2016 at 2:16 PM

Good for her! As long as her parents are listening to her doctor, I'm not going to comment on whether it's bad for her or not.

I can't stop my kids from moving and playing hard even if I tried, so yeah they are very active. We're not going to let our boys push themselves that hard for any physical thing that young, but she's not my kid. 

JanetteA
by Bronze Member on Apr. 1, 2016 at 6:28 PM
1 mom liked this

Stuff like this annoys me.  

Milla didn't decide to do this herself.  Her dad put her up to it.  I bet she doesn't even know what a Navy SEAL does.  

And there are a lot of people (myself included) who think that there's as much wrong with a 9-year-old spending hours in a windowless gym as there is in a 9-year-old spending hours in front of a computer screen.  

And the idea that if a bullied kid works out incessantly and intimidates other kids, that everything will be OK-- that's not inspiring.  That's LYING.  

It's not Milla's fault.  She's just spouting the same gobbledegook that adults have fed to her.  But it's not realistic and it's not an inspiration.

Sebbiemama
by Member on Apr. 1, 2016 at 11:25 PM
2 moms liked this

Okay so I followed the link in the post to the Battlefrog website and If I understand right the elite challenge is on an 8k course that you are supposed to do as many times as you can. So if she only completed 1 course that's less than 5 miles. And the website describes the course as "military-inspired". They are not even pretending to do what real Navy SEAL do. So far the only thing that could even raise any eyebrows is that she's too young. But since they have a single course event for 13 and up, if she only did one course, it's not that much of an age difference. Oh and this same organization has smaller obstacle challenges for kids 4 and up. It's NOT Navy SEAL training. It looks hard but fun.

This article is purposely misleading - the author couldn't get that much wrong without trying.

I still say good for her. She's a kid who worked really hard and feels proud of herself, and she wants to try to use that to encourage others. Sure her dad is directing her, and I get sketchy vibes but I don't know enough about dad to make a judgment call on him. 

wakymom
by Ruby Member on Apr. 3, 2016 at 9:14 PM

It depends on the activity. They like riding their bikes, playing on the playground, and pick-up games of football/basketball with neighborhood kids. They are not as active as they ideally should be, but they don't spend 100% of their time in front of a screen, either.




disneymom2two
by Silver Member on Apr. 4, 2016 at 6:48 AM

One lap may be 5 miles but it says she did 6.  Personally, I wouldn't allow my kid to do this.  My son is a gym rat (he's 17) but he also has other interests.  Yes he plays video games but he also swims, snowboards, scuba dives, runs on the beach, etc.  My daughter dances competitively but she also loves to play outside with friends, go the beach, etc.  I think what this child is doing is not healthy for her age but to each her own.

Quoting Sebbiemama:

Okay so I followed the link in the post to the Battlefrog website and If I understand right the elite challenge is on an 8k course that you are supposed to do as many times as you can. So if she only completed 1 course that's less than 5 miles. And the website describes the course as "military-inspired". They are not even pretending to do what real Navy SEAL do. So far the only thing that could even raise any eyebrows is that she's too young. But since they have a single course event for 13 and up, if she only did one course, it's not that much of an age difference. Oh and this same organization has smaller obstacle challenges for kids 4 and up. It's NOT Navy SEAL training. It looks hard but fun.

This article is purposely misleading - the author couldn't get that much wrong without trying.

I still say good for her. She's a kid who worked really hard and feels proud of herself, and she wants to try to use that to encourage others. Sure her dad is directing her, and I get sketchy vibes but I don't know enough about dad to make a judgment call on him. 


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