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Role models for girls

Posted by on May. 30, 2016 at 6:28 PM
  • 13 Replies

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I learned a little about Malala, a Pakistani girl who was shot for her feminist beliefs and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, when Emma Watson (ambassador to the United Nations, feminist, and Hermine in Harry Potter) interviewed her a year or two ago.

My daughter's non-fiction interests need improvement, so I got her "I am Malala", the young adult version, yesterday on Audible. She is very interested and asks good questions.

These two could be role models. Do your daughters have any role models - alive, deceased, or even fictional?
by on May. 30, 2016 at 6:28 PM
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disneymom2two
by Silver Member on May. 30, 2016 at 7:25 PM

The girls my daughter looks up to are the older girls at dance.  They're great role models - they are hard working, do well in school, are nice, take time to show the little ones how to do tricks, jumps, etc, always encouraging.  My daughter's been on a mini team for 2 years and the older girls have been awesome; I'm seeing my daughter now act toward the upcoming minis (she and her teammates are moving on to petites) like the older ones do to her.  

MommyHuman
by Silver Member on May. 30, 2016 at 7:25 PM
DD school has a program where they are assigned a pen pal at the nursing home near the school. This year she got paired with a lovely woman named Elizabeth. The kids go to the Nursing home once a month to visit their friends, and make gifts and cards for them and the do the same. My DD loves Elizabth and loves her stories. She talks about her nonstop.
GwenMB
by Gwen on May. 30, 2016 at 10:04 PM

What an incredible opportunity for your DD! The schools here do a penpal program with students from the local university (I think just athletes). I wish we did something like this instead, or in addition to it.

Quoting MommyHuman: DD school has a program where they are assigned a pen pal at the nursing home near the school. This year she got paired with a lovely woman named Elizabeth. The kids go to the Nursing home once a month to visit their friends, and make gifts and cards for them and the do the same. My DD loves Elizabth and loves her stories. She talks about her nonstop.


GwenMB
by Gwen on May. 30, 2016 at 10:06 PM
1 mom liked this

I don't have girls, so can't help with that part of this. But this looks like a good book for my boys to read, too. I like them reading about strong women. I'm not a feminist (at least, not as currently defined by those who call themselves feminists), but I do think women should have the same opportunities as men and appreciate women who overcome oppression like this young lady has.

JasonsMom2007
by Silver Member on May. 30, 2016 at 10:08 PM
Those are dds role models as well and a huge factor in our decision to let her join the competition team this year.

Quoting disneymom2two:

The girls my daughter looks up to are the older girls at dance.  They're great role models - they are hard working, do well in school, are nice, take time to show the little ones how to do tricks, jumps, etc, always encouraging.  My daughter's been on a mini team for 2 years and the older girls have been awesome; I'm seeing my daughter now act toward the upcoming minis (she and her teammates are moving on to petites) like the older ones do to her.  

mommy31210
by Member on May. 30, 2016 at 11:20 PM
My daughter dosent have many. She has slowly started to look up to Gorden Juliette Low. (She loves community service and helping people. Girl scouts has realy made my child.) She also meet a local pageant queen and she has been watching her know since. Not a big name but this women was in gs for 13 years and earned the highest award in gs her gold. (Which takes a lot of work)
Impressionists
by Silver Member on May. 31, 2016 at 5:34 AM
I'm not sure what the current definition of feminism is. I'll have to look it up!

Quoting GwenMB:

I don't have girls, so can't help with that part of this. But this looks like a good book for my boys to read, too. I like them reading about strong women. I'm not a feminist (at least, not as currently defined by those who call themselves feminists), but I do think women should have the same opportunities as men and appreciate women who overcome oppression like this young lady has.

Sydel
by Gold Member on May. 31, 2016 at 10:37 AM

I have always considered myself their first role model. I know that they look to me in all topics. Next we have discussed people past and present that I feel are great role models. My oldest likes Oprah, Demi Lovato, Mya Angelou, and two girls she personally knows.

My youngest is 8. She thinks I'm amazing which is a feeling I want to hold on to because I know it's only a matter of time until that fades. She also looks up to her sister and my aunt. She is my aunt's best friend. She has never expressed interest or anyone else. Like her sister I have talked to her about the women I've looked up to.

But unless they have a YouTube channel she's not interested. I tink as she gets older that will change.

I have been following Malala for a few years. She is incredible.

artemisa3001
by Bronze Member on May. 31, 2016 at 11:00 AM
I bought the same book for dd last week. I knew about Malala since the time she was almost killed.
coala
by on May. 31, 2016 at 12:14 PM

Their most recent role model we just met.  She is a 19 yo women who is part of the Junior World Team for the USA for inline speed skating.  Kelsey Helman stayed with us for 4 days a week ago.  She has sent encouraging texts to my girls (on my phone) wishing them luck for their upcoming Regional's event.  I sent her their placements and she sent back messages of congratulations to them.  She was asking if she will see them in Lincoln for National's.  I'm so glad that my girls have such a role model to look up to.  This girl comes from the crappiest background and has over come that.  She has a coach, trainer and sponsors that believe in her.  Without them she would NEVER gotten as far as she has in this sport.  Our family and our door is always open to her at this point.  We have invited her to come back in the fall for a month before she leaves for World's.  I hope she comes!!  My girls have learned from her (and in a very short time) that hard work and dedication are what they need to make it.  In this sport the number of female athletes starts to dimish after they turn 14.  My YDD just competed against 16 in her division over the weekend.  My ODD was up against 14.  At the age that Kelsey is at there were only 3-4.  There is a drastic drop because this is a male dominated sport.  I hope my girls hang in there and I hope that we continue to have people like Kelsey in our lives to help them see that there is so much to achieve!!!

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