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What are your kindergarteners supposed to know by the end of school?

Posted by on Aug. 28, 2009 at 8:42 PM
  • 19 Replies
I found out today that they are expected to read at a level 4. Sentences like "Where are the kids running?" Stuff like that. If not they have to repeat kindergarten. It amazed me. I remember tieing your shoes was the hardest thing you learned. I don't remember having to actually read or do math or social studies. I'm glad they want them to achieve so much in a public school but I'm worried it'll be too much. We have all school year but my son can be uncooperative. He knows all his basic colors(though the teacher thinks he needs help with brown), he can write 1-5 and count to 20 but has a habit to pick and choose when he wants to do so. It drives me crazy. I'm going to work with him as much as I can but I worry about him.
by on Aug. 28, 2009 at 8:42 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Mojitomommy
by on Aug. 28, 2009 at 11:43 PM

We are in our 1st year of Kindergarten and they say the kids will be leaving reading .


On a paper they sent home it says : Sounding out words is NOT the most productive way to read . : Encourage memorization .


I don't think I like the memorization .



SCmomof3girls
by on Aug. 29, 2009 at 12:23 AM

From my older DD's report card from last year:

Recognizing and writing the alphabet, upper and lower case, counting forwards to 100, backwards from 10, adding and subtracting using numbers 1-10, recognizing and understanding patterns, knowing right and left, identifying 2 dimensional shapes, understanding the calendar using months and days of the week, using both digital and analog clocks to tell time, understanding money such as the different coins and their values, organizing and interpreting graphs, understanding the purpose and demonstrating the use of maps, globes and graphs, recognize all major body parts, knowing the five senses, knowing and understanding the four seasons and types of weather that go along with them, basic units of measurement (foot, inch, lbs), able to follow rules and directions, able to share and be courteous, solves conflicts appropriately, participates in the classroom both individually and as a group. They did do reading tests several times throughout the year, but it was not a requirement to pass, as I know there are several of the first graders that are not reading yet. (But then, that may be because kindergarten itself is not a requirement here, you can opt to start your child at first grade)

Rebecca

hill2
by on Aug. 29, 2009 at 12:33 AM

My son just entered 1st grade and what he learned...well lets see if I can recall it all!

He started the year really focusing on sounds and sight words. By mid year they started reading books and by the end of the year he could read decent but very basic words that are fairly easy to sound out. They did alot with patterns, then the basics colors, shapes, they count up to 100 and write their numbers. They did basic adding and subtracting and even some fractions! Real simple but it kind of surprised me! Thye did do science and social studies. I know there is more but I can't think of it.

My son did struggle to read and was in the reading club which is where they get one on one help. He had issues word belending but we read a ton over the summer and he is doing so much better. My suggestion is just practice reading with him as much as you can!!

 

mizzstressed
by on Aug. 29, 2009 at 11:01 AM

My little shadow will begin Kindergarten in the Fall (two weeks) and I am a little nervous. Now honestly it may be just me. In Pre-k 4  she learned to write, identify and and spell colors, number 1-20 but they would count up to 100 and count by 2,5,10 . Days of the week, month at the end of the school year they were working on time and telephone numbers.They had science projects with the formation of butterflies ,Hibernation,(they actually brought in teddy bears and had them sleep until spring she made a cave and all)they had homework every day except the weekend even if it was a review of class work I was very pleased.They did grouping and simple addition and subtraction, patterns,sight words shapes that even surprised me. My concern with Kindergarten as another parent stated I know she can do it  but reading is so crucial and we read to her and with her all the time. But  shadow is so strong willed that she will just shut down and say maybe later. I Just don't want her to get frustrated or over whelmed. I am sure it will all work out but I loved her Pre-K teacher so much I have to get ready for the change. And she has been in a learning Pre school since 2 so she should be ok. Yet I worry.

crazymom21
by on Aug. 29, 2009 at 12:24 PM
Mason can be strong willed too. I didn't have him in pre-k bc its not required. The teacher told me he is behind bc of that. I was thinking that's her job to teach him. I'm not very good at teaching that's why I don't home school. I'm going to do my best. He can get one on one help if he needs it. I just don't want him to fail bc he refuses to do things he knows how to do. I'm glad I put my four year old in pre-k.
jag04_jjg07
by on Aug. 29, 2009 at 2:09 PM

My daughter is expected to read up to Level D. I think she has a hard time reading. They started learning in Pre-K but she didn't do so well. I hope she'll do fine with the reading.

lilyrose73
by on Aug. 29, 2009 at 2:17 PM


Quoting Mojitomommy:

We are in our 1st year of Kindergarten and they say the kids will be leaving reading .

 

On a paper they sent home it says : Sounding out words is NOT the most productive way to read . : Encourage memorization .

 

I don't think I like the memorization .


Kids WILL "memorize" (I prefer to say "automatic recall")  the words they see frequently... you and I read  from memorization... If a child needs to sound out every word on a page it will affect his comprehension (which is the main purpose of reading... understanding).  By having children read the same book over and over again, that will help them do this... then when they see those same words in another book, they will automatically know them... it's all about building fluency...

 


 


Champions find a way... Losers find an excuse

gradenu
by on Aug. 30, 2009 at 12:12 PM

I would totally disagree with what they are telling you here.  In order to become fluent readers we have to gain adequate decoding skills - sounding out words.  It goes from decoding to memorizing - after you have decoded a word, understand it, then it goes to our long term memory and eventually you recognize it when you see it which leads to better fluency.  These skills are essential for later fluency when the child starts dealing with increasingly difficult vocabulary.  I'm not sure if I have explained it adequately - but there is a ton of research now supporting that method.  It doesn't totally throw out whole language but is more balanced - and is a science based program which includes phonics -sounding out words.   AND it is particularly critical to give children these skill early - the older they are when they begin to master them, the more difficult it is for them and the less likely they are to succeed.  


That is not to say that memorization is out - but neither is sounding words out.   And I cannot see how they could say that sounding out words is not the most productive way to read! 

Anyway - that's my soap box: :)  lol


Quoting Mojitomommy:

We are in our 1st year of Kindergarten and they say the kids will be leaving reading .


On a paper they sent home it says : Sounding out words is NOT the most productive way to read . : Encourage memorization .


I don't think I like the memorization .



DearestDawn
by on Aug. 30, 2009 at 7:47 PM

My son begins Kindergarten in a week. Here is NJ, we have the No Child Left Behind Act. This basically means that all children pass to the next grade level. Ultimately it's up to the parents if they agree to have their child retained. The teacher can suggest retention, but if the parents disagree, the child moves on.

Here in K, there are many standards & objectives. Some include: writing 1st & last name, memorize telephone # and address, recognize and show examples of patterns, add & subtract 1 digit #'s, etc. The list goes on & on.  

Houndz
by on Aug. 31, 2009 at 7:01 PM

This is long but it is my district's Kindergarten curriculum...

Kindergarten
Key Understandings


Mathematics
Reading
Science
Social Studies
Writer's Workshop

Mathematics

September – October (Approximately 6 weeks)
Unit 1 “Who Is In School?” 

Counting and Quantity: Strategies for accurately counting a set of objects by 1’s
Students will be able to:

• Demonstrate strategies for accurately counting a set of objects by 1’s
• Count the numbers of students in the class
• Use the calendar to count days
• Connect number names, numerals, and quantities
•  Establish one-to-one correspondence between equal groups
• Demonstrate strategies for accurately counting and keeping track of quantities up to the number of students in the class
• Create an equivalent set
• Count, create, and represent quantities

Data Analysis: Sorting and classifying
Students will be able to:

• Identify attributes (e.g., color, size, and shape) and  use language to describe these
• Compare how objects are the same and different
• Find objects that share  the attribute
• Use attributes to sort a group of objects
• Collect and keep track of survey data
• Describe and compare data in each category
• Interpret results of a data investigation

Whole Number Operations: Using manipulatives, drawings, tools and notation to show strategies and solutions.
Students will be able to:

• Explore math manipulatives and their attributes
• Use the calendar as a tool for keeping track of time and events
• Represent quantities with pictures, numbers, objects, and/or words
• Develop language to describe shapes, position and quantity
• Develop strategies for counting accurately
• Identify whether order matters when you count
• Compare quantities
• Collect, count, represent, describe, and compare data

October – January (Approximately 12 weeks)
Unit 2: “Counting and Comparing

Counting and Quantity
Students will be able to:

• Demonstrate strategies for accurately counting sets of objects one by one
• Demonstrate strategies for accurately counting and keeping track of quantities up to 12
• Connect number words, numerals, and quantities
• Utilize visual images for quantities up to 6
• Count backward
• Create an equivalent set
• Identify whether order matters when you count
• Directly compare two objects and determine which is longer
• Sort objects into two categories according to length
• Use language to describe and compare length (long, longer than, short, shorter than, the same, equal to)
• Use numerals to represent quantities
• Use a Ten-Frame to demonstrate visual images of quantities up to 10
• Demonstrate strategies for counting accurately
• Use the calendar as a tool for keeping track of time
• Collect, count, represent, describe, and compare data


February – March (approximately 6 weeks)
Unit 4: Measuring and Counting 

Linear Measurement
Students will be able to:

• Identify the longest dimension of an object
• Compare lengths of different objects
• Use repeating multiple nonstandard units to quantify length
• Demonstrate strategies for measuring the length of an object
• Count a set of objects and create an equivalent set
• Connect number words, numerals, and quantities
• Keep track of a growing set of objects
• Count spaces and move on a game board
• Create a set of a given size
• Develop and analyze visual images for quantities up to 10
• Find the total after a small amount (1,2,3) is added to a set of up to 7
• Combine two amounts
• Separate one amount from another
• Add or subtract one to/from numbers up to 10
• Decompose numbers in different ways
• Demonstrate combinations of a number (e.g., 6 is 3 and 3 and also 5 and 1)
• Compare two quantities to determine which is more

Whole Number Operations:
Students will be able to:

• Record measurements with pictures, numbers, and/or words
• Use numbers to represent quantities and to record how many
• Use a Ten-Frame to demonstrate visual images of quantities up to 10
• Record an arrangement of a quantity
• Use the calendar as a tool for keeping track of time
• Develop strategies for counting accurately
• Identify whether order matters when you count
• Compare quantities
• Collect, count, represent, describe and compare data
• Identify what comes next in a repeating pattern
• Accurately describe repeating patterns

March – June (approximately 6 weeks)
Unit 6: How Many Do You Have?
 
Counting and Quantity
Students will be able to:

• Demonstrate and analyze visual images for quantities up to 10
• Demonstrate strategies for accurately counting and keeping track of quantities up to 20
• Use subsets to count a set of objects
• Count spaces and move on a game board

Whole Number Operations
Students will be able to:

• Decompose numbers in different ways
• Find the total after 1, 2, or 3 is added to, or subtracted from, a set
• Combine two single-digit numbers with totals to 20
• Separate one amount from another
• Demonstrate strategies for solving addition and subtraction story problems
• Find combinations of five and six
• Consider combinations of a number (e.g., 6 is 3 and 3 and also 5 and 1)
• Use numbers, and/or addition notation, to describe arrangements of objects, to record how many, and to represent an addition situation
• Use numbers, pictures, and/or words to represent a quantity, measurement, or a solution to the problem
• Demonstrate strategies for counting accurately
• Identify whether order matters when you count
• Count forward and backward
• Use the calendar as a tool for keeping track of time
• Collect, count, represent, describe, and compare data
• State what comes next in a repeating pattern
• Accurately describe repeating patterns

Top


Reading

August/September
Unit 1: Getting to Know You
Students will be able to:

• Understand the concept of a word
• Understand that the alphabet is made up of uppercase and lowercase letters
• Understand that a sentence is made up of words
• Recognize rhymes
• Identify the syllables in a word
• Understand the concepts of print--top to bottom and left to right
• Make predictions about a literature selection (literature focus)
• Identify characters in a literature selection (literature focus)

September/October
U
nit 2: I am Special
Students will be able to:

• Recognize rhymes
• Produce rhymes
• Isolate initial phonemes
• Match phonemes
• Produce the sound of letters Mm, Ss, Rr, Tt
• Identify and associate the sounds of letters Mm, Ss, Rr, Tt
• Identify the high-frequency words—a, my, and the
• Identify the setting of a literature selection
• Identify the parts of a book
• Identify information from a non-fiction selection
• Identify the beginning/middle/end of a literature selection

October
Unit 3: Around the Table
Students will be able to:

• Isolate initial phonemes
• Produce rhymes
• Blend phonemes
• Segment words into syllables
• Blend syllables into words
• Blend onset and rhyme to make a word
• Identify and associate the sounds of letters Pp, Cc, Aa
• Produce the sounds of letters Pp, Cc, Aa
• Build consonant-vowel-consonant words using vowel A
• Identify the high frequency words – like, I
• Sequence the events of a literature selection
• Listen and respond to a folktale

November
Unit 4: Silly Business
Students will be able to:

• Isolate phonemes
• Produce the sounds of the letters Nn, Dd
• Identify and associate the sounds of letters Nn, Dd
• Build consonant- vowel-consonant words using the vowel O
• Identify high frequency words – go, we
• Connect a literature selection to life experience
• Segment words into syllables
• Blend syllables into words
• Segment words into phonemes and count the sounds in a word
• Identify the medial sound of a word
• Identify the final sound of a word
• Delete syllables from a word
• Blend the onset & rhyme to make a word
• Match words with the same initial sound
• Clap the rhythm in a poem
• Connect life experience to a text
• Recognize the problem and solution in a story
• Recognize the table of contents of a book
• Differentiate between real and make-believe in a story


December
Unit 5: Family Ties
Students will be able to:

• Isolate initial phonemes Ff, Gg
• Produce the sounds of the letters Ff, Gg, Ii
• Identify and print letters Ff, Gg, Ii
• Segment words into syllables
• Match initial and final phonemes
• Build and blend words using the I vowel sound
• Identify the medial sound of a word
• Recognize the high frequency words – on, to
• Listen and respond to a folktale
• Make and confirm predictions about a story events
• Identify beginning/middle/end of a story
• Connect life experience to a text
• Recognize the problem and solution in a story
• Sequence story events
• Compare two texts
• Identify the setting of a story

January
Unit 6: Animal Families
Students will be able to:

• Isolate initial phonemes Hh and Ll
• Recognize and print letters Hh and Ll
• Say and count sounds in words
• Blend separate phonemes into a word
• Isolate initial, medial, and final phonemes
• Match initial, medial and final phonemes
• Build simple consonant-vowel-consonant word using the vowel I
• Recognize the high frequency words – you and have
• Recall and sequence story events
• Distinguish between real and make believe in a story
• Match words in a repetitive text
• Use picture clues to make predictions

 February
Unit 7: Bug Surprises
Students will be able to:

• Match final and medial phonemes
• Identify and associate the sounds of letters Bb, Oo, Kk
• Produce the sounds of the letters Bb, Oo, Kk
• Build and read consonant-vowel-consonant words with the vowels O and A
• Identify the high frequency words – what, do
• Identify the main idea/details of a literature selection
• Identify character’s feelings on a literature selection
• Compare texts to see how they are alike and different

March
Unit 8: Animal Adventures
Students will be able to:

• Match final and medial phonemes
• Practice phonemes blending
• Delete a syllable from a word
• Identify and associate the sounds of letters Ww, Xx
• Produce the sounds of letters Ww, Xx
• Build and read consonant-vowel-consonant words with the vowels O an A
• Identify the high frequency words – see, no
• Identify character, setting, events in a literature selection
• Identify literary genres
• Use prior knowledge to make predictions about a story
• Retell a story
• Identify problems and solutions in a story


April
Unit 9: Around the Town
Students will be able to:

• Count phonemes in a word
• Practice phoneme deletion
• Identify and associate the sounds of Jj, Ee, Vv
• Produce sounds for letters Jj, Ee, Vv
• Build and read consonant-vowel-consonant words with the vowel E
• Identify the high frequency words – look, come
• Identify cause and effect in a literature selection
• Identify cause and effect of events in literature
• Make predictions when listening to a story


April/May
Unit 10: Neighborhood Helpers
Students will be able to:

• Match medial phonemes
• Isolate medial phonemes
• Substitute initial phonemes
• Practice medial phoneme isolation
• Identify and associate the sounds of letters Yy, Zz, Uu
• Produce the sounds for Yy, Zz, Uu
• Build and read consonant-vowel-consonant words with the vowel E
• Identify the high frequency words – me, for
• Identify story dialogue in a literature selection
• Recall story events
• Use text and illustrations to understand the story

May/June
Unit 11: Exploring Our Surroundings
Students will be able to:

• Substitute initial and medial phonemes
• Practice medial phoneme matching
• Identify and associate the sounds of letters Qq, Uu
• Build and read consonant-vowel-consonant words with the vowel U
• Make and conform predictions
• Identify information from a story

June
Unit 12: Under the Ocean

Students will be able to:

• Practice phoneme substitution
• Identify the high frequency words – are, here

Top


SCIENCE

August – June Trees
S
tudents will be able to:

• Identify that all organisms have basic needs
• Identify that trees need water, nutrients, soil and air
• Identify that each part of a tree serves a different purpose in its growth, development and reproduction
• Identify that organisms have life cycles – trees have life cycles that include growth from seed, developing into mature trees, and formation of new seeds
• Identify that organisms cause changes to their environment
• Identify that resources are things we get from living and non-living things that meet our needs

Top


SOCIAL STUDIES

August/September
Students will be able to:

• Identify their role in the classroom and school
• Identify personal rights and responsibilities at school
• Follow school rules and show respect to teacher, peers, and others
• Follow rituals and routines
• Identify the visible rules the government serves
• Identify the purpose of rules and laws
• Develop an understanding of chronological thinking through days, weeks, months, and years (calendar time)
• Recite the Pledge of Allegiance
• Sing “50 Stars”


October
Students will be able to:

• Demonstrate good citizenship and respect
• Identify Christopher Columbus’ achievements and why we celebrate Columbus Day
• Identify the seasonal changes of fall in our geographic region
• Identify how physical systems impact people ( e.g. snowfall and daily activity)
• Sing “Yankee Doodle”
• Sing “Columbus Sailed with Three Ships”

November
Students will be able to:

• Identify Veteran’s Day and Thanksgiving Day as National Holidays and why we celebrate them
• Identify where and how Native Americans lived long ago
• Identify “honesty” as a component of good citizenship
• Begin to develop a historical interpretation
• Sing “America the Beautiful”

December
Students will be able to:

• Identify different countries’ cultures and celebrations
• Identify “love” and “diversity” as components of citizenship
• Identify the economic principle of “bartering” to acquire goods
• Discuss their family traditions and celebrations
• Use the globe to find places and regions  in the world

January
Students will be able to:

• Identify “justice” as a component of citizenship
• Identify martin Luther King and why we celebrate Martin Luther King Day
• Identify the seasonal changes of winter in our geographical region
• Identify the role, purpose, and characteristics of the family unit
• Review the patriotic songs

February
Students will be able to:

• Identify important individuals (Washington/Lincoln) and the current President of the United States
• Identify the United States flag and recite the Pledge of Allegiance
• Recognize the tune of the “National Anthem” and show respect for the song
• Identify “courage” as a component of citizenship
• Sing “Star Spangled Banner”

March
Students will be able to:

• Identify “loyalty” as a component of citizenship
• Identify service as performed by, but not limited to, local government
• Identify the following geographic tools; map elements, photographs, and a map key
• Identify physical characteristics of places
• State home address and phone number

April
Students will be able to:

• Identify “hope” as a component of citizenship
• Identify the role of people in a community and what they do to make a living
• Explain why people work to get goods and services
• Identify different occupations and identify scarcity as the concept that all resources are limited

May/June
Students will be able to:

• Identify how physical systems impact people ( e.g. weather and growing season)
• Discuss how the temperature gets warmer or colder as the seasons change and how these seasonal changes cause people to respond
• Discuss how the use of land can sometimes change ( e.g. farms are displaced by housing developments and shopping centers and how this impacts our society)
• Discuss the way in which natural resources help us produce things needed to live

Top



Writer’s Workshop

August/September
Students will be able to:

• Generate content and topics for Modeled Writing by the teacher
• Add elements to an Interactive Writing story by the group
• Write a prompted word in a Predictable Chart
• Write their own names
• Understand the writing convention of left to right and return sweep
• Use introduced high frequency words
• Introduce rituals and routines for writing
• Introduce phonetic spelling
• Begin to use ending punctuation
• Write a label

October
Students will be able to:

• Follow the rituals and routines for Writing Workshop
• Understand the concept of phonetic spelling
• Add elements to a predictable chart
• Contribute ideas and sounds to modeled writing by the teacher
• Use introduced high frequency words

November
Students will be able to:

• Produce a piece of narrative writing that communicates a personal experience
• Produce a piece of functional writing that tells directions for making something
• Use introduced high frequency words
• Write a complete sentence

December
Students will be able to:

• Produce narrative writing where the picture matches the text
• Use introduced high frequency words

January
Students will be able to:

• Use high frequency words spelled correctly in their writing
• Participate in gathering information about a topic as a group
• Participate in organizing facts into categories for writing a report
• Use facts to write a report on a topic
• Use introduced high frequency words

February
Students will be able to:

• Participate in gathering information on a topic
• Participate in organizing facts into categories for writing a report
• Use facts to write a report on a topic
• Use introduced high frequency words

March
Students will be able to:

• Use some spaces to separate words in their writing
• Begin to use a capital letter at the beginning of a sentence
• Begin to use ending punctuation
• Use introduced high frequency words

April
Students will be able to:

• Write a narrative with more than one sentence on a topic
• Use introduced high frequency words

May/June
Students will be able to:

• Make an effort to reread their own writing
• Begin to “edit” their writing to “make it better” by checking for capital letters, spaces, ending punctuation and details
• Pause voluntarily in the midst of writing to reread what they have written (tracking)
• Use introduced high frequency words

       briefcasegirl on a swingpuppy


       Marjie          Rosemary      Winnie


Mommy to Rosemary 5 years old ~~ Best Friend to Winnie the Basset Hound


Mom to Quads: Joseph, Patrick. Mairead & Roisin (Born Too Soon ~ Remembered Always)

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