• In the Spotlight:
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

2010 garden challenges

Posted by on May. 26, 2010 at 1:30 AM
  • 4 Replies
  • 222 Total Views

This has been a really strange year in the garden. Due to my neighbors' trees, I have to plant my garden in the front yard. I know this is not for everybody, but my only other option is to not garden at all and that is just not an option.I have LOTS of people stop and make wonderful comments about the garden.

Well, let's see.....I had a hard time getting things to germinate this year. I finally got some squash seeds to germinate and was shocked by how slowly they were growing since they are yellow squash. Last week, I noticed the first squash....BUTTERNUT.  I did not plant any butternut. It appears that the seed package was mislabeled. Now, I am planting yellow squash.

I have harvested all of my potatoes except the Yukon Golds. I planted 4 kinds of fingerlings, LaSoda (sp) and Kennebec whites along with a few russets that sprouted in the kitchen. I don't know exactly how many pounds I harvested, but I think about 60 pounds. That is great considering that my ground only goes down 3 to 6 inches before hitting solid rock.

I harvested a bunch of beets last night. I planted reds, cylindra, stripped and yellow. My ground will not allow me to let the beets get very large,  I will be canning pickled beets some time this week. I have lots more still in the ground.

My tomato patch looks like a jungle. I always plant tomatoes fairly close and don't have a problem, but my plants look like they are on steroids. I have picked my first sun golds and picked a few of the larger tomatoes for fried green tomatoes. Barring a horrible storm or massive insect invasion, this should be a great year for tomatoes.  I planted big boy, better boy, big beef, Cherokee purple, sunmaster, brandywine, marglobe, margo, San Marizano, Juliet, roma, fourth of July, homestead, sweet cluster, sun pride, crista, black krim,  and a few others I can't remember. Some of the plants are so full of tomatoes that I am having trouble getting the limbs off of the ground.

I have seen some spider mites and have sprayed in hopes that I get ahead of them.

The cabbage is doing well although it looks like swiss cheese thanks to some loopers and snails. Onions don't do that well due to the thick soil, but they are hanging in.

I planted rattlesnake beans, Kentucky Wonder, and Blue Lake. they are all doing well. I tossed in a few red noodle seeds and they seem to be growing. The only ones with beans are the rattlesnake beans. I am going to plant pintos where I had my potatoes.

I have planted a variety of squash: yellow, Butternut (which I did not intend), pink banana, bon bon, sweet potato squash, white pattypan, sun burst, spaghetti, yellow zucs and grey zucs. The pink banana has been a real challenge. I split the seeds with a cousin. NONE of the seeds grew. I called Burpee and they replaced the seeds. I have two plants growing. I am looking forward to seeing these grow. I planted white icicle radishes around the squash because I heard that it deters squash borers.

We planted red and purple carrots for one of my sons. They have beautiful tops, but the carrots are small.

My older son is in charge of the peppers. So far, he has jalapenos, cayenne, habaneros, banana, cow horn, bells, and any others he could sneak in his area.  He loves to cook and has plans for some hot sauces.

I spoke with the city inspector to make sure I was not violating any city codes. He told me it was okay to even grow corn, so......I got the okay to late to do what I intended. I have some planted, but don't know if it is too late for them to do well. They are in an area which gets afternoon shade, so I am hoping that is okay.

I also have sugar pie pumpkings growing in one area and sugar baby watermelons in another. We also grow herbs: rosemary, basil, parsley, sage, thyme, cilantro, dill, mint,

My cucumbers have small cucumbers on them. I plan on canning several jars of pickles.

I am disabled and my garden is my salvation. I love to watch things grow. I will post some photos when I figure out my new camera.

by on May. 26, 2010 at 1:30 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-4):
michiganmom116
by Garden Owner on May. 26, 2010 at 7:56 AM

Wow, you sound like ONE BUSY GARDENER!!!  What a great variety you've got!  Did you start the tomatoes and peppers from seeds or plant seedlings from a nursery?

tomatoqueen
by on May. 26, 2010 at 3:56 PM

I bought the peppers and tomatoes as plants. I buy primarily from 2 places. One of the nurseries offers some plants for 49 cents which makes it economical to buy different varieties. I bought the romas as a 6 pack for $1.99.

I forgot about the oregano and okra.

The rosemary, sage, and oregano are 9 years old. I was afraid the bad winter weather would kill them, but they are more beautiful than ever. I also plant a variety of flowers in and around the veggies.

I never understood how my mom could come in from a long day of work as a RN and head to the garden and then can the things she grew. When I worked, I did the same thing. Now that I am disabled, I just have to deal with my health and the heat.....along with a few bugs. It is incredibly relaxing. There is something very satisfying about knowing that you planted and fostered the food you are eating. It is also amazing to think that our ancestors had to grow enough food to feed their families. My grandparents had over 20 kids and took in 5 foster kids. Yes, they grew up on a farm, but that is a heck of a lot of food.

Well, gotta run. I have some beans that I need to pick.

duets
by asst. gardener on Jun. 1, 2010 at 1:20 AM

I never understood how my mom could come in from a long day of work as a RN and head to the garden and then can the things she grew. When I worked, I did the same thing. Now that I am disabled, I just have to deal with my health and the heat.....along with a few bugs. It is incredibly relaxing. There is something very satisfying about knowing that you planted and fostered the food you are eating. It is also amazing to think that our ancestors had to grow enough food to feed their families. My grandparents had over 20 kids and took in 5 foster kids. Yes, they grew up on a farm, but that is a heck of a lot of food.

I totally relate, gee, I'm jazzed that I had 1 green pepper & 2 green beans to pick today, LOL.

strawberry.jpg picture by duetinlv

queenbree545
by on Jun. 2, 2010 at 10:27 AM

My husband complains that I grow enough to feed three families, but I'm like you.  I like the relaxation, the stress free task of gardening.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)