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Is this a radical idea?

Posted by on Jun. 28, 2012 at 3:34 PM
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National Woman's Party


by on Jun. 28, 2012 at 3:34 PM
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Replies (1-7):
Kilhara
by Member on Jun. 29, 2012 at 9:33 AM

I have been amused by all the assertations that growing food is somehow a radical act.  It is a very practical act.  I am very happy to see all of the new community gardens that have been springing up all over, and in some cases providing food for food pantries to help make up for the increased demand and decreased contributions in recent years.  In St. Louis I know of at least one garden that is giving veggie plants to residents, and also chickens for them to raise.

NWP
by assistant gardener on Jun. 29, 2012 at 12:39 PM

Farmer's markets take food stamps, often doubling the value...and in some areas you can use food stamps to buy vegetable plants to plant a garden. I think some folks see it as a radical move, associating it with the slow food movement and urban homesteading..but it is good for our selves, our bodies and our country IMO.

michiganmom116
by Garden Owner on Jun. 29, 2012 at 10:27 PM

It is radical in that for years people have been growing away from home gardening and people like me (have grown gardens since we were kids) are amazed that there are actually people that don't know HOW to grow a garden.  Now people are becoming more concerned with GM foods, with the organic label, and with our health...and they realize that gardening is a way to "fight back".  It's radical in that we're taking back control of what we put in our bodies by growing our own instead of relying on others to grow healthy produce for us.

NWP
by assistant gardener on Jun. 29, 2012 at 10:40 PM

In a sense, I see it this way.

I grew up as the last generation in an agricultural culture. Our family had some acreage that was probably homesteaded in the rush West, but no one can actually remember...when the kids got married, they would build a house or drag a trailer onto part of the land. We had a pack of dogs, a bunch of horses, a lot of chickens and a bunch of kids (cousins and siblings) that were all "free range". We worked a communal garden for the family, canning a preserving for the winter season too.

That ended with the 1970's when the highway cut the land in half and all the grown kids seemed to get divorced at the same time, dividing the land up further. Now it is all gone..none left at all in our family. But I got to live that life for the first decade of my own and have since romanticised it.

When DH and I finally bought our own home, I wanted to put in a garden..but the only spot was right smack in the front yard of my corner lot by a busy road. I did it anyway, in part, as a response to what you wrote above..F'em! Let's get back in touch with our "roots"..I expected some response from the neighbors.

I did get a response from the neighborhood... All three of my other neighbors on the corner planted gardens in their yards! Working that corner lot, I met tons of folks who were walking dogs or babies, some actually stopped their cars to talk to me. It was amazing. Gardens began popping up in front yards around my area..and I did view it as a mini-revolution for the slow food movement.

My motto about the yard? Mow it or grow it.

However, I have still not learned to can or preserve. If you can't dehydrated it or freeze it, I haven't done that yet. Hahhahaha!

Quoting michiganmom116:

It is radical in that for years people have been growing away from home gardening and people like me (have grown gardens since we were kids) are amazed that there are actually people that don't know HOW to grow a garden.  Now people are becoming more concerned with GM foods, with the organic label, and with our health...and they realize that gardening is a way to "fight back".  It's radical in that we're taking back control of what we put in our bodies by growing our own instead of relying on others to grow healthy produce for us.


National Woman's Party


Kelly913
by on Jun. 29, 2012 at 10:48 PM

Sounds like a great way to grow up! 

Quoting NWP:

In a sense, I see it this way.

I grew up as the last generation in an agricultural culture. Our family had some acreage that was probably homesteaded in the rush West, but no one can actually remember...when the kids got married, they would build a house or drag a trailer onto part of the land. We had a pack of dogs, a bunch of horses, a lot of chickens and a bunch of kids (cousins and siblings) that were all "free range". We worked a communal garden for the family, canning a preserving for the winter season too.

That ended with the 1970's when the highway cut the land in half and all the grown kids seemed to get divorced at the same time, dividing the land up further. Now it is all gone..none left at all in our family. But I got to live that life for the first decade of my own and have since romanticised it.

When DH and I finally bought our own home, I wanted to put in a garden..but the only spot was right smack in the front yard of my corner lot by a busy road. I did it anyway, in part, as a response to what you wrote above..F'em! Let's get back in touch with our "roots"..I expected some response from the neighbors.

I did get a response from the neighborhood... All three of my other neighbors on the corner planted gardens in their yards! Working that corner lot, I met tons of folks who were walking dogs or babies, some actually stopped their cars to talk to me. It was amazing. Gardens began popping up in front yards around my area..and I did view it as a mini-revolution for the slow food movement.

My motto about the yard? Mow it or grow it.

However, I have still not learned to can or preserve. If you can't dehydrated it or freeze it, I haven't done that yet. Hahhahaha!

Quoting michiganmom116:

It is radical in that for years people have been growing away from home gardening and people like me (have grown gardens since we were kids) are amazed that there are actually people that don't know HOW to grow a garden.  Now people are becoming more concerned with GM foods, with the organic label, and with our health...and they realize that gardening is a way to "fight back".  It's radical in that we're taking back control of what we put in our bodies by growing our own instead of relying on others to grow healthy produce for us.


 

Some Things Cookin' at my blog! 

ElectraSpy
by on Jun. 30, 2012 at 12:03 AM
1 mom liked this
Doesn't seem radical to me, more sensible & practical. I live urban, but have a big back yard garden & it doesn't seem odd to any of my neighbors. Now the couple hens, I smuggle in next year may seem radical. :)
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NWP
by assistant gardener on Jun. 30, 2012 at 1:27 PM

Our town allows a legal limit of 4 hens in town. My DH says no way though. I think he isn't so much turned off by the hens as by keeping them safe. Everyone we know who keeps them has had trouble, in town and out, keeping things from eating them. I suppose that it is true...anything that eats meat loves chicken. LOL.

Quoting ElectraSpy:

Doesn't seem radical to me, more sensible & practical. I live urban, but have a big back yard garden & it doesn't seem odd to any of my neighbors. Now the couple hens, I smuggle in next year may seem radical. :)


National Woman's Party


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