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 I posted about my "Mr. Stripey" plant a while ago and was asked if "he" had any blooms.  He did not at the time, but

HE DOES NOW!!!  There are about half a dozen, but I don't expect that many tomatoes.  :D

by on Jul. 21, 2012 at 7:58 PM
Replies (11-14):
TeaHound
by on Jul. 30, 2012 at 7:49 PM

 I cut off all the affected leaves (which was almost all of them), as well as all the fruit (didn't eat it, put it to be burned with the leaves) and sqirted the rest of the plant (stems and a few new, little leaflets) w/ baking soda and water.  (That was Sunday, yesterday)  Now the little tiny leaves are blackening.  WHAT DID I DO WRONG??? AND how do I fix it?

They'll come back, right?  I haven't destroyed my plants, have I?

Quoting mikesmom65270:

The browning leaves you mention is due to a fungus, which I have been having also.  I use an organic enzyme problem not originally labeled for this purpose but it does a wonderful job.  Look up other organic fungicides, some are as simple as baking soda and water.  The leaves should be taken completely away and destroyed.  The air roots you mention are not because you didn't plant deep enough, these are normal and of no consequence so you don't need to do anything about them.  I was speaking mainly of sun damage, both on leaf and fruit.

 

mikesmom65270
by master gardener on Aug. 2, 2012 at 8:57 AM

It's been a very bad year for tomatoes!  The black leaves could be another fungus or a bacterial spot.  If most of the leaves are gone, I afraid the likelihood of recovery is unlikely.  Baking soda solution helps but once the plant have gone to a certain stage, there's no going back.  I have had fungus on tomatores and sometimes, no matter what is done and how good the fungicide, the plant is lost.  We;re struggling with ours right now, winning so far but the weather is against us.  The fruit is not usually affected by fungus and would be safe to eat.  Gardening is a learning experience and we're getting hard lessons this summer!

Quoting TeaHound:

 I cut off all the affected leaves (which was almost all of them), as well as all the fruit (didn't eat it, put it to be burned with the leaves) and sqirted the rest of the plant (stems and a few new, little leaflets) w/ baking soda and water.  (That was Sunday, yesterday)  Now the little tiny leaves are blackening.  WHAT DID I DO WRONG??? AND how do I fix it?

They'll come back, right?  I haven't destroyed my plants, have I?

Quoting mikesmom65270:

The browning leaves you mention is due to a fungus, which I have been having also.  I use an organic enzyme problem not originally labeled for this purpose but it does a wonderful job.  Look up other organic fungicides, some are as simple as baking soda and water.  The leaves should be taken completely away and destroyed.  The air roots you mention are not because you didn't plant deep enough, these are normal and of no consequence so you don't need to do anything about them.  I was speaking mainly of sun damage, both on leaf and fruit.

 


TeaHound
by on Aug. 2, 2012 at 7:55 PM

 Yeah, my water guy said he went to the store to by tomato plants and the sales person told him they didn't have any b/c it's too hot for them.

His SIL (the water guy's) does some plant stuff (the water guy called him a "horticulturalist"; although the SIL didn't seem to think he was on that level), anyway...  The SIL said to spray them w/ dish soap solution, so I did.  Now the leaves are blackening.  I tried gently scraping it off w/ my thumbnail (like maybe it was dirt collected b/c of the soap water being sticky) and I sprayed all the soap-ed plants w/ clear water.

Whatever this is, it's affecting pretty much ALL of my plants: 3 different kinds of peppers, 4 kinds of tomatoes, thyme, oregano, spearmint, rosemary.  I thought about trying vinegar b/c it's ph is the opposite of soap, but I'm not sure about any of this anymore.

Oh, the pepper leaves have spots on them that are white and powdery in the center, then black around that, then yellowing to green.

I'm sorry to take so much time w/ this, but until a few years ago, the only personal experience I had w/ growing plants is that I had killed an African violet, a cactus, and a crisanthemum (spelled WAY wrong, sorry).  Thank you for being so patient w/ me and helping to much.  {I think the baking soda thing you told me to do did much better than the soap thing the water guy's SIL told me to do.  I'm a little disappointed.}  But thank you and I'm sorry. :)

Quoting mikesmom65270:

It's been a very bad year for tomatoes!  The black leaves could be another fungus or a bacterial spot.  If most of the leaves are gone, I afraid the likelihood of recovery is unlikely.  Baking soda solution helps but once the plant have gone to a certain stage, there's no going back.  I have had fungus on tomatores and sometimes, no matter what is done and how good the fungicide, the plant is lost.  We;re struggling with ours right now, winning so far but the weather is against us.  The fruit is not usually affected by fungus and would be safe to eat.  Gardening is a learning experience and we're getting hard lessons this summer!

Quoting TeaHound:

 I cut off all the affected leaves (which was almost all of them), as well as all the fruit (didn't eat it, put it to be burned with the leaves) and sqirted the rest of the plant (stems and a few new, little leaflets) w/ baking soda and water.  (That was Sunday, yesterday)  Now the little tiny leaves are blackening.  WHAT DID I DO WRONG??? AND how do I fix it?

They'll come back, right?  I haven't destroyed my plants, have I?

Quoting mikesmom65270:

The browning leaves you mention is due to a fungus, which I have been having also.  I use an organic enzyme problem not originally labeled for this purpose but it does a wonderful job.  Look up other organic fungicides, some are as simple as baking soda and water.  The leaves should be taken completely away and destroyed.  The air roots you mention are not because you didn't plant deep enough, these are normal and of no consequence so you don't need to do anything about them.  I was speaking mainly of sun damage, both on leaf and fruit.

 

 

 

NWP
by assistant gardener on Aug. 6, 2012 at 8:46 PM

Bad garden year all around for me:(

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