Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

What do you think ... Teenage boy hair too long for school but wants to donate it to locks of love

Posted by on Oct. 12, 2009 at 3:29 PM
  • 12 Replies

 Silsbee teen faces in-school suspension

Comments 95 | Recommend 4

Length of teen's hair leads to dispute with district

October 09, 2009 5:27 PM

     SILSBEE- A Silsbee teenager just wanted to help other people but now he believes the school district is not treating him fairly. Jessica Holloway reports, according to the boy's family, what began as a simple act of kindness has turned into disciplinary action but they're not giving up the fight.

     16 year old Jarrot Griffis is a cook at Novrozsky's in Silsbee. Underneath his hat he has long strawberry blonde locks of hair.

     "Jarrot has beautiful hair. He's willing to do something most people aren't willing to do," said Kathy Thomas.

     Griffis plans to donate his hair to Locks of Love. It's a non-profit organization that helps financially disadvantaged children who've lost their hair for medical reasons.

     "If I could give my hair to somebody else and see them with my hair and them smile, that would be meaningful," said Griffis.

     Something even more meaningful to Griffis, his aunt is a breast cancer survivor, but he's lost three family members to cancer, including his best friend.

     "It tore me up inside when my grandma died," said Griffis.

     The minimum length to donate is ten inches but that length violates school policy. In fact, his hair is already in violation of policy. It's not supposed to go past his shoulders.

     "If he can give something back to somebody I think he should be able to do it," said Thomas.

     His mother says it's not about being rebellious. She says he's a good kid. He's bought his own car, has a job and he's never been in trouble. Nevertheless, the law is not on Griffis' side.

     KFDM contact Waldman and Smallwood to find out if there is any recourse.

     "Unfortunately there's not constitutional right to have your hair long. Certainly he can go to the school board," said attorney Tom Oxford.

     "In all four year Jarrot's had long hair we've always conformed to the rules," said Thomas.

     "The courts consider the districts to be the same position as a parent. They make rules about dress, hair length, jewelry, that kind of thing," said Oxford.

     Griffis says he's being discriminated against because girls are allowed to grow their hair long and a couple years ago a former Silsbee High School male student was allowed to grow his hair long.

     "They let him grow it out for some reason but I don't understand why I can't do it," said Griffis.

     Whether now or later, Jarrot says it's something he's set on doing and his family plans to stand behind him.

      KFDM contacted the Silsbee School District. A spokeswoman said the school can't comment on disciplinary issues. The dress code can be found on-line.

     In reference to the graduate of Silsbee high who was allowed to cut his hair, the spokeswoman said, "After doing some research a student was allowed to let his hair grow for that reason. However we have a new superintendent and new administrators at the high school and Silsbee ISD will be consistent with the dress code."


by on Oct. 12, 2009 at 3:29 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
scootermom
by on Oct. 12, 2009 at 3:36 PM

WTF!! Geeeezzzz i think schools districts are going to extremes here!  Give the kid a break he wants to donate his hair to locks of love!  Sending him to in school suspension that's a little over the top!  The school district is crazy and sounds like they having a power trip.

mama2conor
by on Oct. 12, 2009 at 3:39 PM

He should be allowed to grow it out, especially since he's doing it for charity!  You know, there' s a time and place for rules, but sometimes you need to look at the bigger picture.  The school board is being freaking ridiculous.  Hair has NOTHING to do with how a person learns.


Laura1229
by on Oct. 12, 2009 at 3:41 PM

I disagree when ANY school's dress code goes beyond what is WORN in school & crosses into things that can't be changed - hair, peircings, etc.

My local ISD has a similar rule - boys' hair can't be longer than the top of a collared shirt (top of the neck).  It's currently in the middle of a federal lawsuit with a family of Native American descent whose son wears his hair in long braids.  They filed for a religious exemption, and was denied.  When the boy (Kindergarten) showed up with his hair still intact... he spent MONTHS in ISS.  The school even hired another teacher JUST for THIS child - he was taught the same lessons, but was segregated from the entire student body for everything including recess & lunch.

A federal judge finally ordered the school was in the wrong... but they are appealing the decision.

My boys only recently (within the past yr or so) decided they wanted their hair cut.  My oldest was 9 when he got his FIRST haircut.  Even with the cuts they have now - they wouldn't be allowed to go to school.  My oldest & youngest both have hair over their ears and close to their shoulders... my middle boy has a mohawk (also no allowed).

I think schools are for ACADEMIC LEARNING.  Decisions that go beyond education, safety, and good manners should be left between the parent & the child.

Raine2007
by on Oct. 12, 2009 at 3:42 PM

WTF!!! Where is this at?? I'm willing to bet that the max hair length doesn't apply to girls or is there a min. on how long their hair can be?? We are all about equal rights, what is wrong with boys having long hair. One of my best friends has always had hair down to his but, that's just who he is and I am so glad that my High School didn't care about hair length.

Lilypie 3rd Birthday Ticker

Lilypie 1st Birthday Ticker
ShannieP
by on Oct. 12, 2009 at 3:47 PM

stupid 

HuntersMomee
by on Oct. 12, 2009 at 3:47 PM

my hubby had long hair in HS and donated his when he cut it off.

he is doing it for a VERY good reason. that school system needs to remove the sticks from their asses.

pink ribbon

3proud
by on Oct. 12, 2009 at 4:59 PM

Close to Beaumont Texas..... it is sad when a kid wants to do something so worthy to help others and he/she is disiplined for it... they do have a new super... sounds to me the new super has control or the "me in charge" syndrome

Quoting Raine2007:

WTF!!! Where is this at?? I'm willing to bet that the max hair length doesn't apply to girls or is there a min. on how long their hair can be?? We are all about equal rights, what is wrong with boys having long hair. One of my best friends has always had hair down to his but, that's just who he is and I am so glad that my High School didn't care about hair length.


Laura1229
by on Oct. 12, 2009 at 10:47 PM


Quoting 3proud:

Close to Beaumont Texas..... it is sad when a kid wants to do something so worthy to help others and he/she is disiplined for it... they do have a new super... sounds to me the new super has control or the "me in charge" syndrome

Quoting Raine2007:

WTF!!! Where is this at?? I'm willing to bet that the max hair length doesn't apply to girls or is there a min. on how long their hair can be?? We are all about equal rights, what is wrong with boys having long hair. One of my best friends has always had hair down to his but, that's just who he is and I am so glad that my High School didn't care about hair length.

 

The case I mentioned is also in Texas. 

Unfair policy?  Yes.

Frivolous reasoning?  As in... somehow it's a "safety issue" for boys but not for girls?  Yes.

Unlawful?  Nope.  The TX Supreme Court ruled many years ago that having different standards in school dress code for boys & girls does not constitute gender discrimination.

How this has been upheld, I don't know.

randi1978
by on Oct. 12, 2009 at 10:51 PM

The school has no right to enforce a hair length.  As another poster mentioned, they can control clothing, accessories, etc, but hair length and piercings AUTHORIZED by the child's parents is beyond their jurisdiction.

This school needs to get out of the 1950's.

De_Chick
by on Oct. 12, 2009 at 10:57 PM

My son has done this twice and never had a problem with the school. Regardless of what the boy is growing his hair long for its just wrong for the school to have a say imo.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)