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I do not watch alot of news so forgive me for asking...what is the difference between swine flu and the typical flu?

Posted by on Oct. 29, 2009 at 12:06 AM
  • 10 Replies

I never gave it much thought but now my daughter is 4 hours away at college and has come down with it....and this weekend is family weekend! My other 3 kids have really been looking forward to this!! and now I know they will be really mad because they can't go see her.

At what point will my daughter be safe? will her room mates get it because she has it? How is it worse then the regular flu?

I am in the woods and do not get much news so I'm kinda in the dark here and would love to hear from other moms some positive support.

by on Oct. 29, 2009 at 12:06 AM
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Replies (1-10):
lovemymarine306
by on Oct. 29, 2009 at 12:07 AM

the difference is this: mass hysteria.  thats it. same symptoms and everything.  although H1N1 affects young adults and teens more than the regular flu

                                  

Mel30248
by on Oct. 29, 2009 at 12:11 AM

I'm not sure I get it either. We've done research, asked questions to a variety of people & still I dont get it. I think its def hyped up maybe even a gimmickfor the government to make some extra cash. As far as I can tell it's slightly more of a risk of having more complications then the regular flu & for prego women its even more dangerous I've been hearing a lot of horror stories of pregos getting it & dieing or almost dieing.

Wish I had an answer for ya but I'm looking for them myself, we're still on the fence to vax our 22 month old or not.

wheresthewayout
by on Oct. 29, 2009 at 12:19 AM

I just know she feels like hell and she really has never been sick! My kids just don't really get sick so when she says this is the worst she has ever felt, at 18, the mom in me jumps into protective mode, lol

adamsmama
by on Oct. 29, 2009 at 12:24 AM

It's mainly an issue of origin but the swine flu may also cause more severe symptoms and is more likely to lead to complications. One of the major differences is rapid mobilization of lymphocytes (immune cells) to the lungs which causes chest pain and difficulty breathing. I know all of this because I just had it LOL. Generally, a person is no longer contagious if it has been a minimum of 24 hours since he or she last had a fever (which can be impossible to know when you're using fever reducers). In any case, it is definitely wise to avoid exposure to anyone who has or may have the swine flu. It's a matter of common sense/courtesy really, there' s a freaking pandemic going on right now LOL :) Your daughter needs to stay in (and away from any younger sibilings) for as long as she's feeling ill.

CAarmywife
by on Oct. 29, 2009 at 12:25 AM

this is off of the cdc website.

How does 2009 H1N1 flu compare to seasonal flu in terms of its severity and infection rates?
With seasonal flu, we know that seasons vary in terms of timing, duration and severity. Seasonal influenza can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. Each year, in the United States, on average 36,000 people die from flu-related complications and more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu-related causes. Of those hospitalized, 20,000 are children younger than 5 years old. Over 90% of deaths and about 60 percent of hospitalization occur in people older than 65.

When the 2009 H1N1 outbreak was first detected in mid-April 2009, CDC began working with states to collect, compile and analyze information regarding the 2009 H1N1 flu outbreak, including the numbers of confirmed and probable cases and the ages of these people. The information analyzed by CDC supports the conclusion that 2009 H1N1 flu has caused greater disease burden in people younger than 25 years of age than older people. At this time, there are relatively fewer cases and deaths reported in people 65 years and older, which is unusual when compared with seasonal flu.  However, pregnancy and other previously recognized high risk medical conditions from seasonal influenza appear to be associated with increased risk of complications from this 2009 H1N1. These underlying conditions include asthma, diabetes, suppressed immune systems, heart disease, kidney disease, neurocognitive and neuromuscular disorders and pregnancy.

inspain
by Ruby Member on Oct. 29, 2009 at 12:30 AM

You're more likely to die from the regular flu, but the H1N1 is more profitable.

Willowjade
by on Oct. 29, 2009 at 12:31 AM

The difference is swine flu is a strain that went dormate about 40 years ago.  So anyone born after that has never been exposed to this sort of flu virus.  Which is why it is hitting the younger population so hard.  It lowers their respitory function which causes pnemonia to set in.  People aren't dying from the Swine Flu virus they are dying from the pnemonia and inability to breathe due to the virus.

The normal flu is something that is around every year.  Everyone can get sick from it, but since we are constantly exposed to it, relatively healthy people are not hit has hard because their immune systems remember the virus and make antibodies to fight it.  What the vaccine does is make those antibodies active in your system while the virus is floating around, so if you do come in contact with it you already have the antibodies active to fight it, instead of the wait period for your body to make them.

And since they are different strains it is something you need to have 2 vaccines for.  They both make you sick, same symptoms, but they attack people different ways.  The regular virus is like an apple, and the swine flu one is like an orange.  They are both sweet, but taste different, however in the end they are both fruit.

wheresthewayout
by on Oct. 29, 2009 at 12:34 AM

So now I'm even more concerned because she has astma....I just know that when I last talked to her she was refusing to eat or drink

Willowjade
by on Oct. 29, 2009 at 12:41 AM

I know it has been going  crazy throughout colleges.  My friend goes to WSU and this fall right after school started they had 2000 cases.  They actually set up a building for students to stay separate from the rest of the dorms for those who were sick.

Just make sure she is in contact with a physician.  And if at any time she is having trouble breathing to have it checked.  It may be just her asthma but either way, it is better to have it checked and have it be asthma than to ignore it or assume it is just her asthma acting up and have it be something worse.

CAarmywife
by on Oct. 29, 2009 at 12:42 AM

some people who get it can get a very mild case of it. like my dr said unless u are having trouble breathing dont bother coming in. where we are it is very mild and looots of pple have it (i know of a 10 month old that had it and is completely fine). i would think that she needs to drink drink drink like any sickness.

Quoting wheresthewayout:

So now I'm even more concerned because she has astma....I just know that when I last talked to her she was refusing to eat or drink


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