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Young Teen's Desire For Baby May Be Due To Hormonal Problem

Posted by on Jan. 25, 2010 at 4:44 PM
  • 12 Replies

Young Teen's Desire For Baby May Be Due To Hormonal Problem


Q: causes of the desire for a baby during teen years
asked by: DoctorQuestion on August 15th, 2009

Hi,
I am Morgan and i am 13, but 14 in November. I wanted to ask something because i dont feel like i can talk to anyone else about it, I am very young but i really badly want a baby. I have recently been watching Underage and Pregent but that hasnt put me off wanting a baby. I just wanted your advice what do u think i should do?

Thank You

Dr. Goce Aleksovski , MD
replied on August 21st, 2009
Teen Pregnancy Answer A7095



It is quite normal for you sometimes to want to have a baby. The hormonal changes through which your body goes in puberty might increase the wish for motherhood. In different girls the hormonal changes are manifested with increased sexual desire. You might want to check if this wish become stronger in a particular part of your menstrual cycle. If they do, then it is most likely that they are hormone related and that they would regulate by themselves once your body is mature enough.


You have to understand that while your body is capable of pregnancy and delivery, you have to be also psychologically and socially mature for raising a child. A child is a gift, but it also comes with responsibilities and obligations. And once the obligations start bothering you, you cannot give the child back.


If the wish for a baby is unbearable you might want to visit a gynecologist to check if there is a hormonal imbalance. If none is detected, you might want to talk to a psychologist to try to learn techniques which might help you control this wish.

http://ehealthforum.com/health/causes-of-the-desire-for-a-baby-during-teen-years-t197008-a1.html

Come on over and read my abortion rights blog:

http://wingnutwatch.typepad.com/wingnutwatch/

by on Jan. 25, 2010 at 4:44 PM
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Replies (1-10):
futureshock
by Emerald Member on Jan. 25, 2010 at 4:49 PM

Finally some new insight into this issue.

futureshock
by Emerald Member on Jan. 25, 2010 at 8:52 PM

bump

Idiosyncratic
by on Jan. 25, 2010 at 8:58 PM

well naturally that is the age they should be having kids...

emotionally and socially they are supposed to wait a few more years...


but as far as natural instincts go it's pretty normal

StrayMom
by on Jan. 25, 2010 at 8:58 PM

I am not sure what to think about this.  I believe that these young teens want the romantic story they have concocted in their heads with respect to having a a baby (all the attention they will get, someone will love them always, they will be "grown-up", their bf will be with them forever) and have very little idea of the realities of it...which completely clouds their decision making.  They are idealistic and inexperienced.

I think they view it like a fairy tale.  I am not so sure about this hormonal imbalance thing...I am not convinced.  I think the problem is much more social than biological.  But, I am no expert, that's just my opinion.

But, get ready to get bashed again for talking about teen pregnancy...even though you are not bashing anyone in this post but simply presenting information.

 

 

futureshock
by Emerald Member on Jan. 25, 2010 at 9:02 PM


Quoting Idiosyncratic:

well naturally that is the age they should be having kids...

emotionally and socially they are supposed to wait a few more years...


but as far as natural instincts go it's pretty normal

I don't think the doctor is saying it is normal to want a child so badly that you try to have one, though.


If the wish for a baby is unbearable you might want to visit a gynecologist to check if there is a hormonal imbalance. If none is detected, you might want to talk to a psychologist to try to learn techniques which might help you control this wish.

beadingmom17
by Rachel on Jan. 25, 2010 at 9:04 PM

You know, that makes total sense.  It used to be that the second you could get pregnant, you got married and started popping kids out.  It was a basic survival instinct.  The idea of "teenagers" and social ideals of getting married and having kids later into your 20s or later were not introduced until fairly recently (and by that I mean w/in the last 150 years or so).

Quoting Idiosyncratic:

well naturally that is the age they should be having kids...

emotionally and socially they are supposed to wait a few more years...

 

but as far as natural instincts go it's pretty normal


futureshock
by Emerald Member on Jan. 25, 2010 at 9:04 PM


Quoting StrayMom:

I am not sure what to think about this.  I believe that these young teens want the romantic story they have concocted in their heads with respect to having a a baby (all the attention they will get, someone will love them always, they will be "grown-up", their bf will be with them forever) and have very little idea of the realities of it...which completely clouds their decision making.  They are idealistic and inexperienced.

I think they view it like a fairy tale.  I am not so sure about this hormonal imbalance thing...I am not convinced.  I think the problem is much more social than biological.  But, I am no expert, that's just my opinion.

But, get ready to get bashed again for talking about teen pregnancy...even though you are not bashing anyone in this post but simply presenting information.

 

 

LOL!  Thanks for the warning but I think I am pretty much immune to the criticism by this point :)

Come on over and read my abortion rights blog:

http://wingnutwatch.typepad.com/wingnutwatch/

futureshock
by Emerald Member on Jan. 25, 2010 at 9:06 PM


Quoting beadingmom17:

You know, that makes total sense.  It used to be that the second you could get pregnant, you got married and started popping kids out.  It was a basic survival instinct.  The idea of "teenagers" and social ideals of getting married and having kids later into your 20s or later were not introduced until fairly recently (and by that I mean w/in the last 150 years or so).

That is actually not true.  Have you ever seen a chart of "age at first marriage"? 

average age of first marriage 20 in the late 16th century rising to 22 by the late 17th century
men 22 and 24 respectively
(Wrigley & Schofield 1989; Stone 1977)
http://books.google.com/books?id=Jjp6DL-hrQ8C&pg=PA62&lpg=PA62&dq=age+first+marriage+1500%27s+england&source=bl&ots=NsDdODOyed&sig=6xybhF_3o-0Hpx2WGKoZSHmIEYE&hl=en&ei=YF75SrXSAsnOlAfN3MDQDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CA8Q6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=&f=false
Families & Children 1450–1600
European population in 1400s still recovering from Black Death (bubonic plague) of 1300s
    •    Life expectancy short; 40 considered old age
    •    Couples marry late
    •    High infant mortality; poor have few surviving children
    •    Wives legally subservient to husbands but contribute to household economy

Changes in marriage and families in the 1500s:
    •    Marriages occur at later ages; women considered partners in marriage; divorce still difficult but more acceptable under Protestantism
    •    Some use of birth control; high infant mortality continues; many children placed in foundling homes; spreading practice of wet-nursing

Until late 17th century, plague sweeps through Europe every 10–15 years, spread by armies
http://sparkcharts.sparknotes.com/history/european/section3.php
http://sparkcharts.sparknotes.com/history/european/section3.php

LIFE IN THE 1500'S

The next time you are washing your hands and complain because the water temperature isn't just how you like it, think about how things used to be. Here are some facts about the 1500's:

These are interesting...

Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in May, and still smelled pretty good by June. However, they were starting to smell, so brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor. Hence the custom today of carrying a bouquet when getting married.

Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons and men, then the women and finally the children Last of all the babies. By then the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it. Hence the saying, "Don't throw the baby out with the bath water."

Houses had thatched roofs-thick straw-piled high, with no wood underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the cats and other small animals (mice, bugs) lived in the roof. When it rained it became slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and off the roof. Hence the saying "It's raining cats and dogs."


There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house. This posed a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could mess up your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the top afforded some protection. That's how canopy beds came into existence.

The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt. Hence the saying "dirt poor." The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh (straw) on floor to help keep their footing. As the winter wore on, they added more thresh until when you opened the door it would all start slipping outside. A piece of wood was placed in the entranceway. Hence the saying a "thresh hold."


In those old days, they cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that always hung over the fire. Every day they lit the fire and added things to the pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat. They would eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight and then start over the next day. Sometimes stew had food in it that had been there for quite a while. Hence the rhyme, "Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old."

Sometimes they could obtain pork, which made them feel quite special. When visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show off It was a sign of wealth that a man could "bring home the bacon." They would cut off a little to share with guests and would all sit around and "chew the fat."

Those with money had plates made of pewter. Food with high acid content caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400 years or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous.

Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or "upper crust."

Lead cups were used to drink ale or whisky. The combination would sometimes knock the imbibers out for a couple of days. Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial. They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up. Hence the custom of holding a "wake."

England is old and small and the local folks started running out of places to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to a "bone-house" and reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, 1 out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive. So they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the "graveyard shift") to listen for the bell; thus, someone could be "saved by the bell" or was considered a "dead ringer."

And that's the truth... Now, whoever said that History was boring ! ! !
http://www.lifesupporters.com/forums/entertainment/life-1500s-1794.html




Aristocratic women were married quite young by modern standards, generally in their midteens to men in their late twenties or thirties, although this difference lessened in the eighteenth century. Commoner spouses tended to be close in age, marrying in their mid- to late twenties after each had worked for several years, the woman for her dowry and the man to obtain the resources and skills necessary to establish himself in an occupation. Urban dwellers, who relied on wage labor, generally married younger than rural inhabitants, who often had to wait for the deaths of their fathers to inherit land. As proto-industrialization in the mid-eighteenth century turned more people into wage laborers, marriage age fell slightly among common people.
http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G2-3404900703.html


Europe 1700's marriage as late as age 30

http://books.google.com/books?id=XibqvuCdn1MC&pg=PA10&lpg=PA10&dq=average+age+first+marriage+1750&source=bl&ots=V9_bpohFxA&sig=hTAMgiIqXDbk-RL49SbbQMpZdug&hl=en&ei=I2T5SoDdJoHBlAfI7fnFDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CAgQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=average%20age%20first%20marriage%201750&f=false


If one looks at US statistics over the past 100 years for example, one sees that men had an average age at marriage of 25.9 years in 1900. Women in 1900 had an average age at marriage of 22 years. For some this shatters an illusion that women 100 years ago were sold into marriage as young children.
Even Jane Austen, writing in the early 19th century had heroines married at the earliest age of 17 or 18. In Laura Ingalls Wilder’s books, which are semi-autobiographical, her father would not allow her to marry until she was 18. Thus it can be said that the average woman was past 21 when entering her first marriage, 100 years ago.
In other cultures, age at marriage may be slightly lower. For example, in Mexico the mean age of marriage currently is 23.3 years for men and 18.4 years for women. This has increased as well, reflecting Mexico’s increasing industrialization.
Currently the average age at marriage in the US is 26.8 years for men, and 25.1 years for women. It is interesting that though this represents an increased age for men, it is not significantly higher than the rate 100 years ago. Actually age rates at marriage for men declined from 1910 through 1960. Lowest average age for marriage in men was in 1960, when the mean age for marriage was 22.8 years.
There are negligible declines in average age at marriage from 1910-1960 in women. However the difference between the 1910 figures and figures in 1960 are less than two years. In men, the difference is a more significant four year spread. However by the 1970s both figures increased. The largest jump in a decade was women’s average age at marriage in 1980 and 1990. In ten years the age rate jumped from 22 years to 23.9.
http://www.wisegeek.com/how-has-the-average-age-at-marriage-changed-over-time.htm
Year
Males
Females
1890
26.1
22.0
1900
25.9
21.9
1910
25.1
21.6
1920
24.6
21.2
1930
24.3
21.3
1940
24.3
21.5
1950
22.8
20.3
1960
22.8
20.3
1970
23.2
20.8
1980
24.7
22.0
1990
26.1
23.9
1993
26.5
24.5
1994
26.7
24.5
1995
26.9
24.5
1996
27.1
24.8
1997
26.8
25.0
1998
26.7
25.0
1999
26.9
25.1
2000
26.8
25.1
2001
26.9
25.1
2002
26.9
25.3
2003
27.1
25.3
2005
27.0
25.5
2006
27.5
25.9
2007
27.71
26.0
http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0005061.html


Quoting Idiosyncratic:

well naturally that is the age they should be having kids...

emotionally and socially they are supposed to wait a few more years...


but as far as natural instincts go it's pretty normal



StrayMom
by on Jan. 25, 2010 at 9:07 PM

This is where the social aspect comes into it for me.  When I was that age, I started thinking about being a mom SOMEDAY.

IMO its the fantasy, and the need to live that fantasy, that turns SOMEDAY into TODAY for these young girls.

Quoting futureshock:

I don't think the doctor is saying it is normal to want a child so badly that you try to have one, though.

 

If the wish for a baby is unbearable you might want to visit a gynecologist to check if there is a hormonal imbalance. If none is detected, you might want to talk to a psychologist to try to learn techniques which might help you control this wish.


khawley14
by on Jan. 25, 2010 at 9:10 PM

Okay, I am confused, are you saying that 13 and 14 year old girls should be having children because naturally that is the age they should be having them?

I know when I was 13 and 14 yrs old having a baby was the furthest thing from my mind. I don't know of too many 13 and 14 yr olds that have the natural instincts to be a mom. I think most girls that age are living in a fantasy world. Having a child is a huge responsibility and most teenagers I know are not responsible. I am not bashing anyone who has chosen to have a child at that age, but I think we need to really educate these kids, more so than what they are being taught.

Quoting Idiosyncratic:

well naturally that is the age they should be having kids...

emotionally and socially they are supposed to wait a few more years...


but as far as natural instincts go it's pretty normal


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