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Shoot, darn, heck, fudge!! *Edit with info*

Posted by on Jan. 25, 2010 at 10:18 PM
  • 6 Replies

 I am almost 35 weeks pg and I have polyhydromnios. My baby is much larger then normal and it causes me constiant discomfort/pain..

I hurt almost all day every day. Walking is a chore and forget doing anything around the house. I am so ready to have this little guy!!

Right now I am laying in bed, being as still as I can because if I lay VERY still and don't move then my pain level is only a 8 (out of10)

Ugh, sorry. I just needed to whine and my DH is probably tried of hearing me cry.

From the March Of Dimes website:

Polyhydramnios: Too Much Amniotic Fluid

When a woman has polyhydramnios, the level of amniotic fluid surrounding the baby is too high. To understand how this can affect your health and the health of your baby, it's helpful to first understand the role amniotic fluid plays in a healthy pregnancy.

What You Need to Know About Amniotic Fluid
The amniotic fluid that surrounds your baby plays an important role in your baby's growth and development. This clear-colored liquid protects the baby and provides it with fluids. Your baby breathes this fluid into its lungs and swallows it. This helps your baby's lungs and digestive system grow strong. Your amniotic fluid also allows the baby to move around, which helps it to develop its muscles and bones.

The amniotic sac that contains your baby begins to form about 12 days after conception. Amniotic fluid begins to form at that time, too. In the early weeks of pregnancy, amniotic fluid is mainly made up of water supplied by the mother. After about 12 weeks, your baby's urine makes up most of the fluid.

The amount of amniotic fluid increases until about 28-32 weeks of pregnancy. At that time you have about 1 quart of fluid. After that time, the level stays about the same until about 37-40 weeks, when your baby is considered full-term. After that, the level begins to decrease.

What You Need to Know About Polyhydramnios
Polyhydramnios (too much amniotic fluid) occurs in about 2 out of 100 of pregnancies. Most cases are mild and result from a slow buildup of excess fluid in the second half of pregnancy. But in a few cases, fluid builds up as early as the 16th week of pregnancy. This usually leads to very early delivery.

Polyhydramnios is diagnosed with ultrasound. Medical experts do not fully understand what causes this condition. In 2 out 3 cases, the cause is not known. Here are two of the best-known causes:

  • Birth defects in the baby that affect the ability to swallow. Normally, when the fetus swallows, the level of amniotic fluid goes down a bit. This helps to balance out the increase in fluid caused by fetal urination.
  • Heart defects in the baby.

Women with diabetes are at increased risk for polyhydramnios. But they have fewer complications from polyhydramnios than women without diabetes.

Women with mild polyhydramnios may have few symptoms. Women with more severe cases may have discomfort in the belly and breathing problems. That's because the buildup of fluids causes the uterus to crowd the lungs and the organs in the belly.

  • Preterm rupture of the membranes (breaks or tears in the sac that holds the amniotic fluid; also called PROM)
  • Umbilical cord accidents
  • Polyhydramnios may also raise the risk of pregnancy complications, including:
  • Preterm delivery
  • Placental abruption (the placenta peels away from the uterine wall before delivery) 
  • Poor growth of the fetus
  • Stillbirth
  • Cesarean delivery
  • Severe bleeding by the mother after delivery

What You Can Do
The best thing you can do is to go to all your prenatal care appointments. Your health care provider can monitor the size of your belly and how much amniotic fluid is in your womb. If you have a problem, your provider can take steps to help prevent complications in you and your baby.

If you have diabetes, talk to your health care provider about your increased risk of polyhydramnios.

If your health care provider thinks you might have polyhydraminos, you will probably need extra monitoring during your pregnancy. About half the time, polyhydramnios goes away without treatment. Other times, the problem may be corrected when the cause is addressed. For example, treating high blood sugar levels in women with diabetes often lowers the amount of amniotic fluid. Other treatments include removing some amniotic fluid or using medication to reduce fluid levels.

January 2007

by on Jan. 25, 2010 at 10:18 PM
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Replies (1-6):
misssy2000
by Ruby Member on Jan. 25, 2010 at 10:19 PM

awl, sorry to hear that I hope these last weeks fly by for you.




MaeHamMomma
by on Jan. 25, 2010 at 10:38 PM

I am hoping that time flies too or that my doctors finally agree on a earlier c-section date.

Quoting misssy2000:

awl, sorry to hear that I hope these last weeks fly by for you.


djemMama0725
by on Jan. 25, 2010 at 10:42 PM

how large of a baby are we talkin here?

i was severely uncomfortable with my youngest.....he was 9lbs 10.5 oz....

hope you get to have your lil guy soon (well not too soon (:  )


" There will be an answer, let it be......" --Paul McCartney

MaeHamMomma
by on Jan. 25, 2010 at 11:25 PM

At the age he is now he SHOULD be around 3 lbs. However last thursday he was almost 7 lbs. I am sure that he is most likely 7 lbs or more now.

Added to that is all the extra fluid around him. Normal fluid levels are 10, I have been measuring at 25 +.

My doctor thinks that he will be nearly 14 lbs if I go all the way to my due date. 

Quoting djemMama0725:

how large of a baby are we talkin here?

i was severely uncomfortable with my youngest.....he was 9lbs 10.5 oz....

hope you get to have your lil guy soon (well not too soon (:  )


misssy2000
by Ruby Member on Jan. 25, 2010 at 11:28 PM

Wow, that will be a very large baby!

Quoting MaeHamMomma:

At the age he is now he SHOULD be around 3 lbs. However last thursday he was almost 7 lbs. I am sure that he is most likely 7 lbs or more now.

Added to that is all the extra fluid around him. Normal fluid levels are 10, I have been measuring at 25 +.

My doctor thinks that he will be nearly 14 lbs if I go all the way to my due date. 

Quoting djemMama0725:

how large of a baby are we talkin here?

i was severely uncomfortable with my youngest.....he was 9lbs 10.5 oz....

hope you get to have your lil guy soon (well not too soon (:  )






geckoxcl
by on Mar. 10, 2010 at 10:31 AM

I am right there with you.  I was diagnosed with it on Monday after a very painful weekend and on and off cramps throughout the entire pregnancy.  I have been pulled from work and am now at 35w6d.  I have to go to my weekly ob visit in addition to weekly ultrasound and non stress test.  It is Very uncomfortable, and the swelling is spreading.  I am hoping for an early delivery.  Best of luck to you and keep in touch.  We are in the same boat.

Amy

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