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Another Carseat question

Posted by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 9:22 AM
  • 7 Replies

I have my baby in a Graco infant carrier and she's outgrowing it way too soon. She's 15 pounds 10 oz and 26 inches long at 28 weeks old. When she's in her seat her legs are pushed up on the back seat of my car,she's a long baby. My carseat says safe up to 26 inches and 20 lbs.  So I need help finding a seat that will work better for a tall baby and can be RF. With my other kids the infant carrier worked great until they were over 1 year old so I dont know what I'm looking for really. I always liked the seats with the bar that comes down in front of them so they have a place to rest their head when they're tired are those ok for a baby this early though? Any help would be great. 

MOMMY TO 4
SWEET LITTLE HEATHENS:)

by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 9:22 AM
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Replies (1-7):
MommySwiggles
by Platinum Member on Feb. 20, 2010 at 9:33 AM
Omgoodness no! Those seats are dangerous!! She MUST by law rear face to one year and 20 pounds. I recommend the first years 'true fit'. It has one of the tallest shells and will rear face to 35 pounds. Or of you like graco, I bought the graco my ride 65 for my son who is now 10 months old. He still happily and comfortably rear faces. It goes to 40 lbs. He is 28 lbs and 31 inches so I know all about having big babies lol. Good luck!


Kris_PBG
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 9:34 AM

An infant seat it outgrown when the child meets the weight limit of the seat OR there is less than one inch of hard shell above their head.  Feet can dangle off the seat, but you definitely need the one inch of hard shell above their head.  It sounds like you may not have thatany longer.  I can relate - both of my kids outgrew their 20 lb limit seat by 4 months of age.

What is your budget?

The car seats with the bar are known as Overhead Shields - you do NOT want that type of seat - here is why:

Child Passenger Safety experts agree that the Five-Point Harness is the safest, because it provides the snuggest fit and is suitable for the widest range of children.
 
Why use a five point harness?


Five-point harnessed car seats offer a much snugger harness fit than a shielded seat. In all five-point harness seats, the straps come down over the shoulders and across the hips to fasten to the buckle that comes up between the legs. The harness sits snugly against the bony parts of the pelvis (the crotch and hip straps) and across the shoulders and rib cage (the shoulder straps). When a child moves forward in the seat, as they would in a crash, the properly tightened harness is already "holding" the child and it immediately restrains them, spreading the crash force out across the strong bones of the body. There is nothing to impact; nothing for the child to suddenly hit. The child does not move before loading the restraint.

Tray-shield and t-shield seats simply cannot restrain a child as snugly as a five-point harness.  Current motor vehicle safety standards require a "lap restraint" for all car seats.  On tray- and t-shield seats, the shield acts as the lap portion of the restraint.  However, these shields do not fasten snugly across a child's pelvis as a five-point harness does, and they do not adjust to the contours of the child's body.  This allows more forward and side to side movement than a five-point harness does - both before and during a crash.  The tray-shield generally sits at chest level, several inches away from the child.  The t-shield is buckled in at a set distance from the child and sits at chest or abdomen level.  The straps that go over the child's shoulder and between their legs are either attached to the tray or top of the t-shield, attached to the rigid crotch buckle, or attached to webbing that attaches to the tray.  These designs can allow the shoulder straps to be pulled away from the child's body. Any space between the child's body and the shield allow the child to gain a great deal of momentum before s/he is restrained. That restraint is not merely composed of soft harness webbing that stretches to absorb crash force, but a hard, unyielding plastic bar or hard molded rubber. The thin amount of padding material on that bar or the imagined softness of the rubber is not going to make any difference or provide a soft cushion in a 35 mph collision. The design of tray- and t-shield car seats depends on the child impacting those shields - it's part of the restraint. In a crash, the force of the collision will propel the child's body forward.  There's no way to determine which part of the child's body will impact the tray or t.  Maybe they'll be "close enough" to it that they only end up with bruised ribs or a bumped nose. Maybe they won't be so close and they'll break their jaw, break their ribs, or damage their spleen. ER and trauma nurses can account for the numerous head, chest and abdominal injuries they've seen in children who've "impacted" tray and t-shields at a high rate of speed.    

It is known that at least one child has died from a fatal head injury caused when her head struck a tray-shield.  There have been other reported injuries and possibly deaths (matters under investigation or litigation).

momof41981115
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 9:50 AM

 

Quoting Kris_PBG:

An infant seat it outgrown when the child meets the weight limit of the seat OR there is less than one inch of hard shell above their head.  Feet can dangle off the seat, but you definitely need the one inch of hard shell above their head.  It sounds like you may not have thatany longer.  I can relate - both of my kids outgrew their 20 lb limit seat by 4 months of age.

What is your budget?

The car seats with the bar are known as Overhead Shields - you do NOT want that type of seat - here is why:

Child Passenger Safety experts agree that the Five-Point Harness is the safest, because it provides the snuggest fit and is suitable for the widest range of children.
 
Why use a five point harness?


Five-point harnessed car seats offer a much snugger harness fit than a shielded seat. In all five-point harness seats, the straps come down over the shoulders and across the hips to fasten to the buckle that comes up between the legs. The harness sits snugly against the bony parts of the pelvis (the crotch and hip straps) and across the shoulders and rib cage (the shoulder straps). When a child moves forward in the seat, as they would in a crash, the properly tightened harness is already "holding" the child and it immediately restrains them, spreading the crash force out across the strong bones of the body. There is nothing to impact; nothing for the child to suddenly hit. The child does not move before loading the restraint.

Tray-shield and t-shield seats simply cannot restrain a child as snugly as a five-point harness.  Current motor vehicle safety standards require a "lap restraint" for all car seats.  On tray- and t-shield seats, the shield acts as the lap portion of the restraint.  However, these shields do not fasten snugly across a child's pelvis as a five-point harness does, and they do not adjust to the contours of the child's body.  This allows more forward and side to side movement than a five-point harness does - both before and during a crash.  The tray-shield generally sits at chest level, several inches away from the child.  The t-shield is buckled in at a set distance from the child and sits at chest or abdomen level.  The straps that go over the child's shoulder and between their legs are either attached to the tray or top of the t-shield, attached to the rigid crotch buckle, or attached to webbing that attaches to the tray.  These designs can allow the shoulder straps to be pulled away from the child's body. Any space between the child's body and the shield allow the child to gain a great deal of momentum before s/he is restrained. That restraint is not merely composed of soft harness webbing that stretches to absorb crash force, but a hard, unyielding plastic bar or hard molded rubber. The thin amount of padding material on that bar or the imagined softness of the rubber is not going to make any difference or provide a soft cushion in a 35 mph collision. The design of tray- and t-shield car seats depends on the child impacting those shields - it's part of the restraint. In a crash, the force of the collision will propel the child's body forward.  There's no way to determine which part of the child's body will impact the tray or t.  Maybe they'll be "close enough" to it that they only end up with bruised ribs or a bumped nose. Maybe they won't be so close and they'll break their jaw, break their ribs, or damage their spleen. ER and trauma nurses can account for the numerous head, chest and abdominal injuries they've seen in children who've "impacted" tray and t-shields at a high rate of speed.    

It is known that at least one child has died from a fatal head injury caused when her head struck a tray-shield.  There have been other reported injuries and possibly deaths (matters under investigation or litigation).

 Her head is pretty much even with the top of her seat.

My budget: well I'm not wealthy but I'm willing to pay extra for a safer seat. I was thinking like $140 or less.

I see what your saying about the dangers of the tray seat,I've never had an accident and I'm no carseat expert,so I didnt know.

MOMMY TO 4
SWEET LITTLE HEATHENS:)

Kris_PBG
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 9:56 AM

OK - for a $140 or under budget I would look at then Evenflo Triumph Advance.  You can find it online for as low as $110 with free shipping.

Now if you can stretch your budget another $10-$20, then I would also look at the Graco My Ride 65 ($150) or the First Years True Fit ($150-$160).  The My Ride rear faces up to 40 lbs  and ff to 65.  The TF rear faces up to 35 lbs, ff to 65.  Both are super nice seats.

I actually own a Evenflo Triumph Advance and LOVE it - so if the other seats really push your budget, don't even worry about it - I just wanted to give you the options around your budget that the safety techs and advocates recommend. :)

Quoting momof41981115:

 

Quoting Kris_PBG:

An infant seat it outgrown when the child meets the weight limit of the seat OR there is less than one inch of hard shell above their head.  Feet can dangle off the seat, but you definitely need the one inch of hard shell above their head.  It sounds like you may not have thatany longer.  I can relate - both of my kids outgrew their 20 lb limit seat by 4 months of age.

What is your budget?

The car seats with the bar are known as Overhead Shields - you do NOT want that type of seat - here is why:

Child Passenger Safety experts agree that the Five-Point Harness is the safest, because it provides the snuggest fit and is suitable for the widest range of children.
 
Why use a five point harness?


Five-point harnessed car seats offer a much snugger harness fit than a shielded seat. In all five-point harness seats, the straps come down over the shoulders and across the hips to fasten to the buckle that comes up between the legs. The harness sits snugly against the bony parts of the pelvis (the crotch and hip straps) and across the shoulders and rib cage (the shoulder straps). When a child moves forward in the seat, as they would in a crash, the properly tightened harness is already "holding" the child and it immediately restrains them, spreading the crash force out across the strong bones of the body. There is nothing to impact; nothing for the child to suddenly hit. The child does not move before loading the restraint.

Tray-shield and t-shield seats simply cannot restrain a child as snugly as a five-point harness.  Current motor vehicle safety standards require a "lap restraint" for all car seats.  On tray- and t-shield seats, the shield acts as the lap portion of the restraint.  However, these shields do not fasten snugly across a child's pelvis as a five-point harness does, and they do not adjust to the contours of the child's body.  This allows more forward and side to side movement than a five-point harness does - both before and during a crash.  The tray-shield generally sits at chest level, several inches away from the child.  The t-shield is buckled in at a set distance from the child and sits at chest or abdomen level.  The straps that go over the child's shoulder and between their legs are either attached to the tray or top of the t-shield, attached to the rigid crotch buckle, or attached to webbing that attaches to the tray.  These designs can allow the shoulder straps to be pulled away from the child's body. Any space between the child's body and the shield allow the child to gain a great deal of momentum before s/he is restrained. That restraint is not merely composed of soft harness webbing that stretches to absorb crash force, but a hard, unyielding plastic bar or hard molded rubber. The thin amount of padding material on that bar or the imagined softness of the rubber is not going to make any difference or provide a soft cushion in a 35 mph collision. The design of tray- and t-shield car seats depends on the child impacting those shields - it's part of the restraint. In a crash, the force of the collision will propel the child's body forward.  There's no way to determine which part of the child's body will impact the tray or t.  Maybe they'll be "close enough" to it that they only end up with bruised ribs or a bumped nose. Maybe they won't be so close and they'll break their jaw, break their ribs, or damage their spleen. ER and trauma nurses can account for the numerous head, chest and abdominal injuries they've seen in children who've "impacted" tray and t-shields at a high rate of speed.    

It is known that at least one child has died from a fatal head injury caused when her head struck a tray-shield.  There have been other reported injuries and possibly deaths (matters under investigation or litigation).

 Her head is pretty much even with the top of her seat.

My budget: well I'm not wealthy but I'm willing to pay extra for a safer seat. I was thinking like $140 or less.

I see what your saying about the dangers of the tray seat,I've never had an accident and I'm no carseat expert,so I didnt know.


MommaBunch84
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 9:58 AM

I agree with Kris.

                         


I'm Ashley! I'm 25 & married to my high school sweetheart Chris. Together for 8 1/2 yrs now. We have 2 1/2 yr old blue eyed, blonde curly haired fraternal twin boys, Mason & Connor. Who ERF in Sunshine Kids Radian 80SL's!!  I am a SAHM and a proud Child Safety Passenger Advocate (CPSA). Have car seat questions? PM me or join the Car Seat Safety Group HERE.

Kris_PBG
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 10:12 AM

Here is the Evenflo Triumph Advance for $109 with free shipping.  :)

http://www.albeebaby.com/evenflo-triumph-advance-lx-blackburn.html

I forgot to add that all three of those seats should get you to booster age!  :)

vances_mom
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 11:22 AM
I have a true fit and I love it! The detachable head rest is great and makes the seat fit better at a lower angle (so long as they aren't at the height limit). DD is 8m/o and 27" long and still has a TON of room. She's been in that seat since she was brought home from the hospital and it has grown to meet her needs as she gets bigger/longer. Good luck making a decision!
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