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Car seat mammas

Posted by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 11:54 AM
  • 12 Replies

 I have a question. I am doing some research on ERF, and rear facing car seats. I see all the studies of a front crash, can someone please show me studies from a rear crash?  Most accidents are rear accidents or fender benders there are also ones that hit the back of the car at high impact. Is ERF proven also safe for rear impact? I have seen 50 million videos and tests on the front impact crash but none on a rear impact.

I am not bashing or saying ERF is bad, the truth is, i see how much better it is to ERF in a front crash but where are the rear impact tests? I am thinking of switching her back to ERF, but I need more info. Can the car seat mamma's help me out?

     All my love, All my life.


 Madison,clayton,allura.


     All my love, All my life.

by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 11:54 AM
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Replies (1-10):
allurasmamma
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 11:58 AM

 No one knows? No one?

La-Belle-Vie
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 12:00 PM


Quoting allurasmamma:

 No one knows? No one?

Give us a sec, gathering some info now.  Most car accidents are frontal and side impact!  Be back with some more info in a sec. 

Photobucket

allurasmamma
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 12:02 PM

 

Quoting La-Belle-Vie:


Quoting allurasmamma:

 No one knows? No one?

Give us a sec, gathering some info now.  Most car accidents are frontal and side impact!  Be back with some more info in a sec. 

 Sweet, thank you so much. I really need to know about this.

     All my love, All my life.


 Madison,clayton,allura.


     All my love, All my life.

La-Belle-Vie
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 12:03 PM


What if I am hit from behind?  Won't my child be safer facing forward?

Frontal and side impacts are the most common type of crashes. They account for 96% of all crashes. They are also the most deadly type of crashes (especially side impacts) and rear-facing children have MUCH more protection in both types of crashes than forward-facing. In the 4% of rear impact crashes that a rear-facing child would be in, they have at least the same amount of protection that a FF child would have in a frontal impact, with the added benefit of less crash energy being transferred to them, and the fact that the rear impact is usually not as severe.

The forces in a rear impact crash are much different from the forces in a frontal impact crash. In a frontal impact, the forces are much greater because the vehicles are usually traveling in opposite directions. Experts suggest that a frontal crash is the same as hitting a concrete barrier � the vehicle and all occupants come to a dead stop within less than 1 second.

When you are struck in a rear impact, the vehicles involved are traveling in the same direction, and the vehicle that is hit in the back has room to move forward. The crash force on the occupants is much less than in a frontal impact. The movement of the impacted vehicle, in addition to the crush zone, absorbs a lot of the crash energy, so it is not transferred to the child. Additionally, the majority of rear impacts are at low speeds.

In short, if your child is rear-facing, he has optimal protection in the types of crashes you are most likely to be in. If he is forward-facing, he may have optimal protection in a rear-end crash, but statistically, that is the least likely to happen and he is 60% more likely to be injured or killed in the types of crashes (frontal, side impact) you are most likely to be in.

You can learn more about the physics of rear-facing at http://www.car-safety.org/rearface.html

ETA showing you what percentage of where crashes happen


http://www.crashtest.com/imgserver/angle468.gif




Photobucket

allurasmamma
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 12:10 PM

 Thank you so much.  Wonder why I can't find any research videos like that of those that are out there now on front crashes? What if it is an accordion crash? Like that of one car hits another hits another.  Would that be just like a front crash?What if there is no room to move the impacted car? Rear to front crash?

Quoting La-Belle-Vie:

 

What if I am hit from behind?  Won't my child be safer facing forward?

Frontal and side impacts are the most common type of crashes. They account for 96% of all crashes. They are also the most deadly type of crashes (especially side impacts) and rear-facing children have MUCH more protection in both types of crashes than forward-facing. In the 4% of rear impact crashes that a rear-facing child would be in, they have at least the same amount of protection that a FF child would have in a frontal impact, with the added benefit of less crash energy being transferred to them, and the fact that the rear impact is usually not as severe.

The forces in a rear impact crash are much different from the forces in a frontal impact crash. In a frontal impact, the forces are much greater because the vehicles are usually traveling in opposite directions. Experts suggest that a frontal crash is the same as hitting a concrete barrier � the vehicle andall occupants come to a dead stop within less than 1 second.

When you are struck in a rear impact, the vehicles involved are traveling in the same direction, and the vehicle that is hit in the back has room to move forward. The crash force on the occupants is much less than in a frontal impact. The movement of the impacted vehicle, in addition to the crush zone, absorbs a lot of the crash energy, so it is not transferred to the child. Additionally, the majority of rear impacts are at low speeds.

In short, if your child is rear-facing, he has optimal protection in the types of crashes you are most likely to be in. If he is forward-facing, he may have optimal protection in a rear-end crash, but statistically, that is the least likely to happen and he is 60% more likely to be injured or killed in the types of crashes (frontal, side impact) you are most likely to be in.

You can learn more about the physics of rear-facing at http://www.car-safety.org/rearface.html

 

     All my love, All my life.


 Madison,clayton,allura.


     All my love, All my life.

jrp0606
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 12:31 PM

CrashPercentages.jpg 
http://www.crashtest.com/imgserver/angle468.gif picture by Papooses

http://www.freewebs.com/sacredjourneys/newbornpreschool.htm


I'm Jessi, 28 year old SAHM to one crazy three year old Austin, currently harnessed in a Britax Frontier.  I'm a Child Passanger Safety Technician (CPST).  We only get one chance in a motor vehicle accidents, the decisions you make can save your childs life.  To find out more follow me here.







 

jrp0606
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 12:39 PM

I copied and pasted this from another post - because i didn't feel like writing it all out again. sorry


you can't find any videos because crash test videos are rarely released - I went through all the ones I have and I can't find any of rear impacts where they have been released.



OK basic physics lesson.

An object will continue to move in the direction it was traveling until something stops it.

So if you are driving at 30 mph your vehicle - everything in it and all the occupants are also traveling at 30mph.

I know I'm just crazy but as a general rule I drive forward - so everything in my car is traveling towards the front of the car.

IF you were to be rearended your car would be - wait for it - pushed forward.

Also rear end accidents are less likely - and usually at lower speeds. (yes there will always be catostophic accidents where nothing would have allowed a child to survive but those are rare)

For adults - our seatbelts and airbags stop us moving - the airbag is designed to spread the force over a large area and slow your body down to help keep your head and neck inline.

For a forward facing child the harness will stop their body - but there is nothing to stop their head so it will continue to move forward until the spine can't stretch any further then it will snap back.

for a rearfacing child the back of the car seat stops the childs whole body - keeping their head and spine in line and spread the crash force over a wide area.

If you are stationary and rear ended the chances are you would be hit at a much lower speed.

If you are stationary and hit at a high speed - then say a prayer because only god could say any rear seat occupants.


I'm Jessi, 28 year old SAHM to one crazy three year old Austin, currently harnessed in a Britax Frontier.  I'm a Child Passanger Safety Technician (CPST).  We only get one chance in a motor vehicle accidents, the decisions you make can save your childs life.  To find out more follow me here.







 

allurasmamma
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 12:47 PM

 Again...thank you so very much. I love all the info you gave me, and am now seriously considering going out right now and flipping the car seat around  to ERF. My dd is will be 2 on Feb 25th. She weighs like 25 lbs. I also read somewhere yesterday that it is unsafe to use both the latch system and the harness system together. Man, am I stupid. I put her car seat in, then strapped it in the seat belt in right. Then took the latch and connected it to the back of the car.  Behind the car seat. She is now FF, So do u understand how I have it? This is not safe? Not compared to Erf but compared to FF.

Quoting jrp0606:

I copied and pasted this from another post - because i didn't feel like writing it all out again. sorry

 

you can't find any videos because crash test videos are rarely released - I went through all the ones I have and I can't find any of rear impacts where they have been released.

 

 

OK basic physics lesson.

An object will continue to move in the direction it was traveling until something stops it.

So if you are driving at 30 mph your vehicle - everything in it and all the occupants are also traveling at 30mph.

I know I'm just crazy but as a general rule I drive forward - so everything in my car is traveling towards the front of the car.

IF you were to be rearended your car would be - wait for it - pushed forward.

Also rear end accidents are less likely - and usually at lower speeds. (yes there will always be catostophic accidents where nothing would have allowed a child to survive but those are rare)

For adults - our seatbelts and airbags stop us moving - the airbag is designed to spread the force over a large area and slow your body down to help keep your head and neck inline.

For a forward facing child the harness will stop their body - but there is nothing to stop their head so it will continue to move forward until the spine can't stretch any further then it will snap back.

for a rearfacing child the back of the car seat stops the childs whole body - keeping their head and spine in line and spread the crash force over a wide area.

If you are stationary and rear ended the chances are you would be hit at a much lower speed.

If you are stationary and hit at a high speed - then say a prayer because only god could say any rear seat occupants.

 

     All my love, All my life.


 Madison,clayton,allura.


     All my love, All my life.

La-Belle-Vie
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 1:02 PM


Quoting allurasmamma:

 Again...thank you so very much. I love all the info you gave me, and am now seriously considering going out right now and flipping the car seat around  to ERF. My dd is will be 2 on Feb 25th. She weighs like 25 lbs. I also read somewhere yesterday that it is unsafe to use both the latch system and the harness system together. Man, am I stupid. I put her car seat in, then strapped it in the seat belt in right. Then took the latch and connected it to the back of the car.  Behind the car seat. She is now FF, So do u understand how I have it? This is not safe? Not compared to Erf but compared to FF.

It really is a lot safer and at her weight she can easily rear face again!  What seat do you have now?  Also click on my siggy and join the group, you would learn so much more too!

I think you are confused on the Latch thing or maybe I am misunderstand you.  Did you connect the seat with the lower latch or the top tether?  If you have the lower latch connected with the seat belt that is unsafe in either ff position or the rf position.  Now you can have it tethered while it is latched on the bottom OR using a seat belt but not both.  Is that confusing?

Here is a Latch diagram of what I am talking about, so tell me if you are using the lower anchors AND the seat belt together. 


LATCH diagram




Photobucket

allurasmamma
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 1:08 PM

 

I am using the tether but not the lower anchor and she is FF. So I have the belt through the car seat like shown here and then the one on top (tether) connected. NOT the bottom Anchor. Does that make sense? I have to go look which one I have (car seat) but I am almost Positive it is ERF. 

One question, is the anchor the seat belt or the metal thing that connects to the car?

Sorry , i am trying to learn better. Thank you so much for helping me out with this.

LATCH diagram

 



 

     All my love, All my life.


 Madison,clayton,allura.


     All my love, All my life.

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