Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

I found it! Egg replacements.

Posted by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 1:01 PM
  • 9 Replies

 

EGG SUBSTITUTES FOR BAKING TOP

Eggs have three main functions in cooking and baking: they add moistness, they bind ingredients together, or they leaven. How do you know what the egg is in your recipe? If the egg is the main liquid ingredient, it adds moistness. If the recipe has one egg but a fair amount of baking powder or soda, (or if there are no other components in the recipe that would be able to hold the other ingredients together, like bread crumbs, nuts, flour) the egg is the binder. If there are no other rising agents, the egg is the leavening. **To maintain the integrity of your recipe, you shouldn't try to replace more than two eggs.**

IF A RECIPE USES EGGS FOR ITS LIQUID PROPERTIES ALONE, two tablespoons per egg of any liquid, like juice, milk or soy milk, will do just fine. To add moisture and flavor to baked goods requiring eggs, substitute ½ (half) mashed banana or 1/4 (one-fourth) cup of applesauce or pureed fruit for each egg. Keep in mind that because these add moisture to a recipe, you might have to bake for a bit longer than the recipe calls for.

TO ACHIEVE THE BINDING PROPERTIES OF EGGS: * Use one mashed banana per two eggs in baked sweets. * Try blending two ounces of silken or soft tofu per egg with the liquid in the recipe. * One tablespoon of arrowroot or one tablespoon soy flour and two tablespoons water mixed together also work when added to the ingredients. * Try a mixture of 2 tablespoons flour, two tablespoons water, ½ (half) tablespoon oil and ½ (half) teaspoon baking powder.

TO ACHIEVE THE LEAVENING EFFECTS THAT EGGS PROVIDE: * Add an extra half teaspoon of baking powder per egg. Or, you can substitute an acidic liquid (buttermilk or thinned and beaten yogurt) for the liquid required in the recipe. To avoid a bitter final product, limit the amount of baking powder of baking soda to one teaspoon per cup of flour. *Consider the way you want to make your batter. Add air to lighten by creaming together the sweetener and the fat before adding dry ingredients. Whipping the liquid ingredients together in a food processor for 30-45 seconds works, as well.

OTHER TIPS FOR LIGHT, EGGLESS BAKING: *Successful eggless baking will be more successful if you don't take for granted the type of flour you use. For example, whole wheat flour contains gluten, which can make a chewy end product. * Try replacing some of the whole wheat flour with whole wheat pastry flour or any other flour that doesn't contain gluten, like brown rice flour, buckwheat flour, soy flour, corn flour, millet flour, amaranth flour, or quinoa flour. Keep in mind, however, that gluten helps baked goods rise, and substituting with a low-gluten flour may not always work.


I was born too late....    I woulda been a damn good hippie!

by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 1:01 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-9):
SassyPainter
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 1:02 PM

Eggs are actually good for you.

hatinnd
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 1:02 PM

I know, but the chickens suffer.

*edit*    Unless you can get 'free range' eggs.

I was born too late....    I woulda been a damn good hippie!

mistie900
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 1:03 PM

I think I'm going to save this. My grandma wont eat anything with eggs in it. I think I will show it to her. Thanks!

hatinnd
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 1:05 PM

 

Quoting mistie900:

I think I'm going to save this. My grandma wont eat anything with eggs in it. I think I will show it to her. Thanks!

 You're very welcome.  I've been looking for egg subs for baking, and this explains it very well.

I was born too late....    I woulda been a damn good hippie!

SassyPainter
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 1:06 PM


Quoting hatinnd:

I know, but the chickens suffer.

*edit*    Unless you can get 'free range' eggs.

I know I know.  *sigh*  Even "free range" eggs have questionable humanity.  I fortunately get eggs from my parents' hobby farm--very happy healthy chickens and more eggs than my parents can use.  I know most people don't have this luxury.

MommynMonster
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 1:09 PM

Not if you have a kid with EA. Thanks for the info OP!

Quoting SassyPainter:

Eggs are actually good for you.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v230/pinkmonkeysponge/f2e36336.gif?t=12637133844lxcspj.jpg picture by pinkmonkeyspongehttp://img.photobucket.com/albums/v230/pinkmonkeysponge/ico-resurrect11.gif?t=1263713485volde-mart.jpg picture by pinkmonkeyspongehttp://img.photobucket.com/albums/v230/pinkmonkeysponge/ico-mollytrix07.gif?t=1263713445http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v230/pinkmonkeysponge/SweeneyMrsLovett.jpg?t=1263713462http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v230/pinkmonkeysponge/arithmancy.png?t=1263713493

AZM
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 1:16 PM

I don't eat that many eggs but my son wont eat meat or meat substituts so he get his protein from eggs and other non meat foods. can I ask how chickens are suffering? 

SassyPainter
by on Mar. 6, 2010 at 1:50 PM

An egg allergy?  Well, obviously eggs wouldn't be good for them, would they?  I was speaking in general terms.

Quoting MommynMonster:

Not if you have a kid with EA. Thanks for the info OP!

Quoting SassyPainter:

Eggs are actually good for you.



Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)