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lunar eclipse

Posted by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 12:17 AM
  • 7 Replies

does anyone know what time the lunar eclipse starts tomorrow?

by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 12:17 AM
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Replies (1-7):
MandyOs
by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 12:18 AM

BUMP!

JustMe0326
by Platinum Member on Jun. 26, 2010 at 12:18 AM

 There's a lunar eclipse tomorrow??

Mommy4000
by Gold Member on Jun. 26, 2010 at 12:18 AM

at night

kriket2004
by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 12:20 AM

i have never seen alunar ecliipse so is it while the sun is still up or what?

kelliehelvie
by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 12:24 AM

Have you tried google?

It's actually a partial lunar eclipse

NikLvsNick
by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 12:25 AM

I found this...

The eclipse in the Americas begins at about 4:50 a.m. Central Daylight Time (CDT) (950 GMT) while the Sun is beginning to rise on the opposite side of the sky.

People in the western and central parts of the United States and Canada will see the best views of the lunar eclipse.

The Moon will be setting in the western sky just as the eclipse reaches is maximum, and just before the Sun begins to rise in the eastern sky, for the dawning of a new day.

People in the eastern United States and northeastern Canada, generally, will not see the lunar eclipse (a few will see a quick glance) because the Moon will have already set below the horizon before the eclipse begins.

At around 6:38 CDT (1138 GMT), the largest portion of the Moon will be eclipsed—just less than 54% of it—as the Earth’s shadow falls on about half of the Moon.

The lunar eclipse is expected to last for a total of nearly three hours.

During this time, much of the Moon will be darkened by the event, with a possibility of seeing color hues of orange and red coming off of the Moon—of course, with weather permitting.

kriket2004
by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 12:34 AM

thanks you really helped me out a lot

Quoting NikLvsNick:

I found this...

The eclipse in the Americas begins at about 4:50 a.m. Central Daylight Time (CDT) (950 GMT) while the Sun is beginning to rise on the opposite side of the sky.

People in the western and central parts of the United States and Canada will see the best views of the lunar eclipse.

The Moon will be setting in the western sky just as the eclipse reaches is maximum, and just before the Sun begins to rise in the eastern sky, for the dawning of a new day.

People in the eastern United States and northeastern Canada, generally, will not see the lunar eclipse (a few will see a quick glance) because the Moon will have already set below the horizon before the eclipse begins.

At around 6:38 CDT (1138 GMT), the largest portion of the Moon will be eclipsed—just less than 54% of it—as the Earth’s shadow falls on about half of the Moon.

The lunar eclipse is expected to last for a total of nearly three hours.

During this time, much of the Moon will be darkened by the event, with a possibility of seeing color hues of orange and red coming off of the Moon—of course, with weather permitting.


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