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csections lead to higher risk of contracting mrsa and other...

Posted by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 2:00 PM
  • 15 Replies

While reading about nosocomial infections I came across an article about how infants' born via c-section and how the bacteria found on them differ from the bacteria taken from infants born via vaginal delivery. The findings were pretty scary! Apparently the bacteria found on vaginal birth babies resemble bacteria found in a mother's vagina whereas csection babies have bacteria common to hospitals such as staph genus bacteria. Also it mentioned that csection babies have a very high risk of contracting a MRSA infection! I know that many csections are unavoidable but it seems as though elective csection, or csections without valid reasons are on the rise in the US. Now, first let me say that I'm not anti csection I appreciate its available in cases of emergency I just wanted to share.



Medical: C-section may affect type of bacteria baby has

Babies born by C-section are microbial blank slates, apt to pick up whatever they're exposed to in a hospital delivery room or from the first people who touch them

By LEE BOWMAN

Scripps Howard News Service

Microbes are with us all our lives, from before the cradle to the grave. And while some are capable of killing us, most of the microbes we carry around - inside and on our skin - are part of a microbial bouquet that makes each of us who we are.

Researchers have been studying the trillions of microbial hitchhikers accommodated by each and every person for decades, but they're still gaining new insight into how they make us tick, or sick.

One study found that there are significant differences in the bacterial colonies of newborns delivered vaginally compared to babies delivered by cesarean section.

Babies delivered through the birth canal had bacterial communities that resembled their mothers' vaginal bacteria; the C-section babies had common human skin bacterial colonies, dominated by those from the Staphylococcus genus, most of them harmless, but some that can cause severe infections.

"These differences we are seeing in this study might be related with increased health risks in C-section babies, although more research is needed," said Maria Dominguez-Bello, a researcher at the University of Puerto Rico and a lead author of the new study, published June 21 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Earlier studies showed that babies born by C-section tend to be more susceptible to certain infections, allergies and asthma than babies born vaginally.

Dominguez-Bello said the study might help explain a higher infection rate among C-section babies with strains of highly drug resistant staph infections, or MRSA, infections that have been increasing in hospitals and clinics in recent years.

A 2004 study of newborn infections at hospitals in Chicago and Los Angeles found that between 64 percent and 82 percent of MRSA skin infections occurred among infants born by C-section.

The new study involved nine mothers and 10 newborns at a Venezuelan hospital, with the babies' bacteria sampled within 24 hours of birth from their skin, mouths and digestive tracts. The researchers used gene-sequencing techniques to analyze all the bacteria.

"In a sense, the skin of newborn infants is like freshly tilled soil that is awaiting seeds for planting - in this case, bacterial communities," said Noah Fier, an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Colorado, Boulder, and a co-author of the report. "The microbial communities that cluster on newborns essentially act as their first inoculation."

Babies born by C-section are microbial blank slates, apt to pick up whatever they're exposed to in a hospital delivery room or from the first people who touch them after they are born, including, in many instances, their fathers.

Internally, researchers are also finding that our gut bacteria - the several hundred or so species, 10 trillion to 100 trillion strong - that inhabit our colon and small intestine are more influential than once thought in affecting our metabolism and weight, and perhaps our immune and hormone system functions.


It appears that infants also get most of their gut bacteria from their moms, no matter how they're born, but also pick up bacterial colonies from other family members in their first weeks.

Intestinal bacteria are vital to us because we can't digest some foods, such as certain starches, without them, nor extract certain essential vitamins. But bacteria also interact with various hunger hormones that control metabolism, production of fat and even how fast food moves through the intestine.

As anyone who has taken a powerful antibiotic can attest, it's easy to disrupt our bacterial balance. Other research, in mice and humans, has shown that dieting can change the relative types of gut bacteria in obese individuals.

On the other hand, there's considerable evidence that having too many of certain kinds of intestinal bacteria can ramp up appetites and contribute to obesity, perhaps even throwing off regulation of blood sugar and fat storage.

Not surprisingly, several groups of researchers are plotting whether it might be possible to identify which of our gut microbes may encourage us to eat less, and then find some way to cull out the bugs that make us fat in favor of those that make us lean.

A number of digestive aids that claim to do this can already be found on the market, but scientists say we're likely some years away from really being able to design an ideal gut bouquet for any particular individual.ct Lee Bowman at BowmanL

Information retrieved on June 25, 2010 from:
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/health/2012187127_csection25.html





by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 2:00 PM
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Replies (1-10):
ToriBabe1221
by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 2:05 PM
Very interesting. Thanks for sharing :)
Aydans_Mommy
by Ruby Member on Jun. 26, 2010 at 2:07 PM
I think the article is bullshit. I had a c-section. We are both fine
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Wendy_June
by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 2:07 PM


Quoting ToriBabe1221:

Very interesting. Thanks for sharing :)


Hisservent
by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 2:08 PM

 I had 2 c-sections and both my babies were/are fine

All I have, all I am, all I ever will be, is because of you, Lord! I am crucified with Christ, therefore I no longer live. Jesus Christ now lives in me! I am a 100% pro-life, wife,  Christian, choir singin, recyclin, natural products usin, vaccinatin, non co-sleepin, breastfeedin, CIO method usin, soy milk drinkin, organic milk givin, coffee drinkin, dog lovin, schedule stickin to, vitamin givin/takin, soy candle burnin, as Green as I can get,  WAHM of 2.


  

mrs.autry21
by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 2:12 PM

My daughter was born by c-section and so were most my sister's and brother,And many of other people i know  and ALL had very healthy babies with out any health problems what so ever.

FL2AK
by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 2:12 PM
I would think any surgery of any kind could lead to a higher chance of contracting MRSA.
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mrs.autry21
by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 2:13 PM

Ohhh and i plan on having another c-section if/when i have another baby.

UxorQuodMatris
by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 2:17 PM

 Why do people jump on the defensive over this?

It's just a damn article. It doesn't say you WILL contract MRSA, just a higher chance.

I'm glad everyone and their babies are fine and healthy.

 

ToriBabe1221
by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 2:18 PM
I don't think the article says you WILL encounter problems I think it says the CHANCES of such problems increase w/ surgery vs vaginal birth
Susan0805
by on Jun. 26, 2010 at 3:37 PM

Yup, it says the RISK of contracting an infection such as MRSA is higher in kids born via csection. THanks for the support! :-)

Quoting ToriBabe1221:

I don't think the article says you WILL encounter problems I think it says the CHANCES of such problems increase w/ surgery vs vaginal birth



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