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My baby threw up blood *UPDATE in red*

Posted by on Dec. 1, 2010 at 6:21 AM
  • 24 Replies

I'm freaking out like crazy because my baby girl has been having TONS of issues with throwing up and not gaining any weight. But all the tests that have been done have come back negative.

So we tried several things such as medications for reflux, supplemental formula, different breast feeding positions etc. The combination of what I was doing for her was starting to work really well until the past 3 days.

She started throwing up more consistently again and now, not even 30 minutes ago I woke up to her crying, went to check on her-vomit everywhere. And in the middle of all this vomit-a big brown spot with blood in the middle.

We coincidentally are scheduled for an xray at the hospital this morning but I'm absolutely scared. I woke my husband up and showed the stain to him, I don't know how he was able to go right back to sleep! It's 5am and there's no way I could even THINK about going back to sleep. My baby girl is sick and I can't help her!

I'm starting to really worry and the more doctors are getting concerned, the more it's concerning me. I don't want anything bad to happen to my little girl, I've already got one that's got several issues mentally but those are easily taken care of with therapy and speech sessions. If I have a sick baby, there's a chance she gets so sick that she dies and as horrible as it is for that thought to cross my mind, it is still a possibility if she doesn't get any better.

*Keep baby Ellie in your thoughts & prayers please, my daughters are my world and if anything bad happened to either of them, my world would come crashing down.

crying

Well we went to the hospital, got the xray done, didn't see a doctor, instead they sent us right over to her pediatrician. From there, they told us we had to wait for our scheduled appointment time which was 2 hours later.

Back to the hospital, they said there was nothing they could do for her since she was so little and hadn't spit up blood since 4:30am and to just wait it out until our appointment.

It was close to our appt time anyway so we just went in early. Xrays came back clean. Just showed "some reflux". They are keeping her on her medicine and supplemental formula and have added rice cereal again. Which she didn't do well at all the FIRST time she tried rice cereal.

So all in all...they still don't have a damn clue what is wrong with my baby girl. We have yet another appointment tomorrow afternoon to "see if the cereal helped any" (which I know it won't) and from there they're going to "toy" with the idea of admitting her to the hospital, which they've been saying for over a week now....

I'd really just like some answers from these doctors already...

by on Dec. 1, 2010 at 6:21 AM
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Replies (1-10):
armywife009
by on Dec. 1, 2010 at 6:23 AM

I will be keeping her in my prayers. I really hope everything gets figured out and she can be better!

artsygirl2010
by on Dec. 1, 2010 at 6:24 AM
Go to er
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
M.I.A...P.O.W
by Silver Member on Dec. 1, 2010 at 6:28 AM
I hope you get some answers soon. It is so scary when stuff like that happens. However, the blood could have came from broken vessels in her throat from throwing up so much. Call her doc. Or take her to the er if you are very concerned.
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katiPeas
by on Dec. 1, 2010 at 6:30 AM

group hugoh momma i would be beside myself with fear and worry too. if she is pretty little little yet, i would take her to the ER myself

carterscutie85
by *Shanny's Stalker* on Dec. 1, 2010 at 6:31 AM

Yep, was going to say the same thing.

I hope your baby girl is OK OP.

Quoting M.I.A...P.O.W:

I hope you get some answers soon. It is so scary when stuff like that happens. However, the blood could have came from broken vessels in her throat from throwing up so much. Call her doc. Or take her to the er if you are very concerned.


CafeMom Tickers
mommasbabies77
by on Dec. 1, 2010 at 6:33 AM
Quoting M.I.A...P.O.W:

I hope you get some answers soon. It is so scary when stuff like that happens. However, the blood could have came from broken vessels in her throat from throwing up so much. Call her doc. Or take her to the er if you are very concerned.



What I was thinking. Hope she's ok.


snowwhitefox
by on Dec. 1, 2010 at 6:46 AM

Infant Vomiting

Susan recently gave birth to a sweet baby girl. This bundle of joy completely changed the lives of Susan and her husband Peter. They were extremely happy and took care that their baby did not suffer from any kind of medical disorder. But, one day while Susan was not at home, Peter fed the baby and he fed her too much food. This led to vomiting in the baby. Seeing the baby vomit continuously, Peter was extremely worried as he did not know what to do and why the baby was vomiting!

Like Peter, many people tend to feed the baby with lots of food, which can lead to vomiting in the infant. Infants vomiting is rarely fine. A bit of infant vomiting after feeding is observed commonly among most of the infants. They tend to vomit after eating, if the food is heavy and if they are unable to digest it. At times, the infants tend to spit out the food if they do not like it or if they are not willing to eat it. Reflux vomiting and projectile vomiting are common among infants. Let us know more about these two kinds of infant vomit in detail.

Reflux Vomiting in Infants
When the valve which is present at the top of the stomach opens accidentally, then the matter present in the stomach comes slowly back up the esophagus, thus leading to vomiting.

Projectile Vomiting in Infants
When the content present in the stomach comes out via the mouth forcefully, then it is termed as projectile vomiting. Here's more on projectile vomiting in infants.

Infant Vomiting Causes
below are some well known infant vomiting causes.

  • Gastroenteritis is one of the reasons which can cause vomiting in infants.
  • Also, feeding the baby with heavy and too much food can make him vomit. Hence, make sure that you feed the baby with light baby food.
  • If the baby is suffering from any other medical condition, then there are chances that the baby will suffer from vomiting too.
  • Eating food infected with bacteria and virus can also cause the baby to vomit. This may cause food poisoning which can make the baby also suffer from diarrhea along with vomiting. Read more on food allergies in infants and diarrhea in toddlers.
  • If the food habits of the infant are changed all of a sudden, then also there are chances that the infant might suffer from vomiting.
  • Consuming too many medicines is also one of the reason which can give rise to the same.

Treatment for Infant Vomit
Feed the baby with food which can be digested easily. Make sure that you feed the baby in small portions. The baby should be well hydrated, hence, make sure that you feed him with enough of fluids. Allow the baby to take enough rest. Take proper baby care to keep your baby away from all these kind of disorders.

If the infant is vomiting after eating any kind of food continuously, then it is a matter might be serious and hence appropriate treatment should be opted for. Also, if you observe blood or bile in the vomit, then it is a serious matter of concern. Since the infants' digestive systems are weak, make sure that you do not feed them with food which has too much of spices. Also, fried foods should be avoided.

You may also like to know more on:

Infant vomit should be treated as soon as possible, as it might affect the baby's health. Due to vomiting, the baby will not be able to gain enough weight. Also, since he will vomit out whatever he will eat, he will not get the nutrients, which are required for his growth. This might hamper the baby's development. Vomiting will also leave the infant irritated and since he will lack the energy, he will be least interested in doing any other work or playing. The baby will appear to be extremely weak. Hence, make sure that the infant vomiting is treated as early as possible. Take the infant to a pediatrician and take his advice on what to feed the baby and what not to.

http://www.buzzle.com/articles/infant-vomiting.html

Vomiting: what's normal and what's not

Sponsored by

Is it normal for my baby to vomit?

It's common for babies to vomit frequently in the early weeks as they adjust to feeding and as their bodies develop. You can tell when your baby is vomiting rather than just possetting (bringing up small quantities of milk), because there will be a lot more coming out, not just a few teaspoons trickling down his chin (NHS 2009b). It can be frightening for your baby, so he's likely to cry.

Everything from car sickness to indigestion can cause your baby to be sick - even a prolonged bout of crying or coughing can trigger this reflex. So you may see quite a lot of vomiting in your baby's first few years.

An attack of vomiting will generally subside six to 24 hours after it starts, without any particular treatment apart from a change in diet (see below, about how to deal with vomiting). As long as your baby seems otherwise healthy and continues to gain weight, there's usually no need to worry.

When should I worry?

During your baby's first few months, vomiting is probably caused by mild feeding problems, such as his tummy being too full. After the first few months, a sudden onset of vomiting is more likely to be caused by a stomach virus, such as gastroenteritis, which is often accompanied by diarrhoea.

Your baby may also be sick when he has:

Once your child is a little older, it can sometimes be a symptom of more serious illnesses. Call your doctor if you notice any of the following warning signs in your baby:
  • Signs of dehydration, including a dry mouth, lack of tears, sunken fontanelle, and fewer wet nappies than usual (less than six nappies a day).


  • A fever, with a temperature of 38 degrees C or higher if he is younger than three months, or 39 degrees C or higher if three months or older.


  • Refusal to breastfeed or drink his formula milk.


  • Vomiting for more than 12 hours, or vomiting with great force.


  • A non-blanching rash, which is a rash that doesn't fade when the skin is pressed.


  • Sleepiness or severe irritability.


  • A bulging fontanelle.


  • Shortness of breath.


  • A swollen abdomen.


  • Blood or bile (a green substance) in the vomit (see below).


  • Persistent forceful vomiting in a newborn within half an hour of eating (see below).

Blood or bile in the vomit: This is usually nothing to worry about. It may happen when the force of regurgitation causes tiny tears in the blood vessels lining the food pipe (oesophagus). Your baby's vomit may also be tinged with red if he has swallowed blood from a cut in his mouth or has had a nosebleed in the past six hours.

However, call your doctor if your baby continues to have blood in his vomit or if the amount is increasing. The doctor will probably want to see a sample of the vomit if it contains blood or bile, so, although it may be an unpleasant task, try to save some. Green bile can indicate that the intestines are blocked, a condition that needs immediate attention (NICE 2009).

Persistent or forceful vomiting in a newborn within half an hour of eating: This may be due to pyloric stenosis, a rare condition that is most likely to begin when your baby is a few weeks old, but could show up at any time before he reaches four months.

The baby vomits when a muscle controlling the valve leading from the stomach into the intestines has thickened so much that it won't open up enough to let food through (NICE 2009). The problem is simple to remedy with minor surgery, but it does require immediate medical attention.

How should I deal with vomiting?

Every child is going to be sick sooner or later, and usually it's nothing to worry about. Like every other part of parenthood, it's something you'll soon get used to, and there are steps you can take to help him get better:

  • Keep him hydrated: When your baby vomits, he's losing precious fluids. It's important to replace them so he won't get dehydrated. To do this, give him sips of oral rehydration solution (ORS), such as Dioralyte, a few times an hour, alongside his usual breastmilk or full-strength formula, and water. Don't give your baby fruit juices or carbonated drinks (AAFP 2009; NHS 2009a; NICE 2009).


  • Ease him back into his routine: If your baby hasn't vomited for 12 to 24 hours, you can begin moving back to his usual diet, but keep giving him plenty of fluids (AAFP 2009). Start with easy-to-digest foods such as cereal or yoghurt (NICE 2009). You can also try using frozen clear liquids, such as ice lollies, if your child is over 12 months.


  • Help him rest: Going to sleep may also help settle your baby. The stomach often empties into the intestines during sleep, relieving his need to vomit.

Don't give your child anti-nausea medicines (prescription or over-the-counter), unless your GP has prescribed them.

If your baby attends childcare or nursery, keep him at home until at least 48 hours after his last episode of vomiting (NICE 2009).
 
snowwhitefox
by on Dec. 1, 2010 at 6:49 AM

Most of the time, vomiting in children is caused by gastroenteritis, usually due to a virus infecting the gastrointestinal tract. (Gastroenteritis is sometimes called the "stomach flu," which can also cause nausea and diarrhea.)

These infections usually don't last long and are more disruptive than dangerous. However, kids (especially infants) who are unable to take in enough fluids and also have diarrhea could become dehydrated.

It's important to stay calm - vomiting is frightening for young children (and parents, too) and exhausting for kids of all ages. Offering plenty of reassurance to your child and taking measures to prevent dehydration are key for a quick recovery.

For Infants Under 6 Months

  • Avoid giving plain water to a young infant unless your doctor directly specifies an amount.
  • Offer your infant small but frequent amounts - about 2 to 3 teaspoons, or up to ½ ounce (about 20 milliliters) - of an oral electrolyte solution every 15 to 20 minutes with a spoon or an oral syringe. Oral electrolyte solutions (available at most supermarkets or pharmacies and also called oral electrolyte maintenance solutions) are balanced with salts to replace what's lost with vomiting or diarrhea, and they also contain some sugar. It's especially important for young infants that any fluids given have the correct salt balance (unflavored electrolyte solutions are best for younger infants).
  • Gradually increase the amount of solution you're giving if your infant is able to keep it down for more than a couple of hours without vomiting. For instance, if your little one takes 4 ounces (or about 120 milliliters) normally per feed, slowly work up to giving this amount of oral electrolyte solution over the course of the day.
  • Do not give more solution at a time than your infant would normally eat - this will overfill an already irritated tummy and will likely cause more vomiting.
  • After your infant goes for a period of time (more than about 8 hours) without vomiting, reintroduce formula slowly if your infant is formula-fed. Start with small (½ to 1 ounce, or about 20 to 30 milliliters), more frequent feeds and slowly work up to the normal feeding routine. If your infant already eats baby cereal, it's OK to start solid feedings in small amounts again.
  • If your infant is exclusively breastfeeding and vomits (not just spits up, but vomits what seems like the entire feed) more than once, then breastfeed for a total of 5-10 minutes every 2 hours. If your infant is still vomiting, then call your doctor. After 8 hours without vomiting, you can resume breastfeeding normally.
  • If your infant is under 1 month old and vomiting all feeds (not just spitting up), call your doctor immediately.

For Infants 6 Months to 1 Year

  • Avoid giving plain water to an infant under 1 year unless your doctor directly specifies an amount.
  • Give your infant small but frequent amounts - about 3 teaspoons, or ½ ounce (about 20 milliliters) - of an oral electrolyte solution every 15-20 minutes. It's important that any fluids given to infants under 1 year of age who are vomiting have the correct salt balance (again, oral electrolyte solutions are balanced with salts to replace what's lost with vomiting or diarrhea).
  • An infant over 6 months of age may not appreciate the taste of an unflavored oral electrolyte solution. Flavored solutions are also available, or you can add ½ teaspoon (about 3 milliliters) of juice to each feeding of unflavored oral electrolyte solutions. Frozen oral electrolyte solution pops are often appealing to infants in this age group; this approach also encourages the slow intake of fluids that's required.
  • Gradually increase the amount of solution you're giving if your infant is able to keep it down for more than a couple of hours without vomiting. For instance, if your infant takes 4 ounces (about 120 milliliters) normally per feed, work slowly up to giving this amount of oral electrolyte solution over the course of the day.
  • Do not give more solution at a time than your infant would normally eat - this will overfill an already irritated tummy and will likely cause more vomiting.
  • After your infant goes more than about 8 hours without vomiting, you can reintroduce formula slowly to your infant. Start with small (1 to 2 ounces, or about 30 to 60 milliliters), more frequent feeds and slowly work up to the normal feeding routine. You can also begin small amounts of soft, bland foods that your infant is already familiar with such as bananas, cereals, crackers, or other mild baby foods.
  • If your infant doesn't vomit for 24 hours, you can resume your normal feeding routine.

For Kids 1 Year and Older:

  • Give clear liquids (milk and milk products should be avoided) in small amounts (ranging from 2 teaspoons to 2 tablespoons, or up to 1 ounce or 30 milliliters) every 15 minutes. Clear liquids that are appropriate include:
    • ice chips or sips of water
    • flavored oral electrolyte solutions, or add ½ teaspoon (about 3 milliliters) of nonacidic fruit juice to the oral electrolyte solution
    • frozen oral electrolyte solution pops
  • If your child vomits, then start over with a smaller amount of fluid (2 teaspoons, or about 5 milliliters) and continue as above.
  • If there's no vomiting for approximately 8 hours, then introduce bland, mild foods gradually. But do not force any foods - your child will tell you when he or she is hungry. Saltine crackers, toast, broths, or mild soups (some noodles are OK), mashed potatoes, rice, and breads are all OK.
  • If there's no vomiting for 24 hours, then you can slowly resume the regular diet. Wait 2 to 3 days before resuming milk products.

When to Call the Doctor

The greatest risk of vomiting due to gastroenteritis (the "stomach flu") is dehydration. Call your doctor if your child refuses fluids or if the vomiting continues after using the suggestions above. Call the doctor for any of the signs of dehydration listed below.

Mild to moderate dehydration:

  • dry mouth
  • few or no tears when crying
  • fussy behavior in infants
  • fewer than four wet diapers per day in an infant (more than 4 to 6 hours without a wet diaper in a younger infant under 6 months of age)
  • no urination for 6 to 8 hours in children
  • soft spot on an infant's head that looks flatter than usual or somewhat sunken

Severe dehydration:

  • very dry mouth (looks "sticky" inside)
  • dry, wrinkled, or doughy skin (especially on the belly and upper arms and legs)
  • inactivity or decreased alertness
  • appears weak or limp
  • sunken eyes
  • sunken soft spot in an infant
  • excessive sleepiness or disorientation
  • deep, rapid breathing
  • no urination for more than 6 to 8 hours in infants
  • no urination for more than 8 to 10 hours in children
  • fast or weakened pulse

The following symptoms may indicate a condition more serious than gastroenteritis; contact your doctor right away if your infant has any of these:

  • projectile or forceful vomiting in an infant, particularly a baby who's less than 3 months old
  • vomiting in an infant after the infant has taken an oral electrolyte solution for close to 24 hours
  • vomiting starts again as soon as you try to resume the child's normal diet
  • vomiting starts after a head injury
  • vomiting is accompanied by fever (100.4° Fahrenheit/38° Celsius rectally in an infant under 6 months of age or more than 101-102°F/38.3-38.9°C in an older child)
  • vomiting of bright green or yellow-green fluid
  • your child's belly feels hard, bloated, and painful between vomiting episodes
  • vomiting is accompanied by severe stomach pain
  • vomit resembles coffee grounds (blood that mixes with stomach acid will be brownish in color and look like coffee grounds)
  • vomiting blood

Reviewed by: Steven Dowshen, MD
Date reviewed: September 2008

 
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snowwhitefox
by on Dec. 1, 2010 at 6:49 AM


Quoting artsygirl2010:

Go to er


bmswifey
by on Dec. 1, 2010 at 7:41 AM

Go to the er.

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