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Vaccine - Swollen injection site

Posted by on Jul. 28, 2011 at 8:22 PM
  • 19 Replies

Ok ladies.  My 5 yr old has no antibodies, so she had a pneumonia vaccine Tuesday, hoping to add some of the antibodies to her system so she will stop getting soooooo sick.  That was two days ago.  Today it is still swollen, about 2 1/2 inches across and 3 inches tall, bright red and raised about like a mosquito bite. 

I know her system doesn't react typically, however, I'm hoping some of you have seen a shot that was swollen and could give me an idea of what a normal time frame is before I call the doc. 

The other kids didn't do this that I remember, and I just don't know what to expect. 


by on Jul. 28, 2011 at 8:22 PM
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Replies (1-10):
fire_of_indy
by on Jul. 28, 2011 at 8:24 PM
call the doc better safe then sorry
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
LilGina
by on Jul. 28, 2011 at 8:24 PM

Its normal it will go away

Sarcasimom
by on Jul. 28, 2011 at 8:26 PM

Pneumonia Vaccine Information
Pneumonia Vaccine
Pneumonia Vaccine Side Effects
Pneumonia Vaccine Uses
Pneumonia Vaccine Dosage
Pneumonia Vaccine Drug Interactions
Pneumonia Vaccine Warnings and Precautions
An Introduction to Pneumonia Vaccine Side Effects
As with all vaccines, side effects are possible with the pneumonia vaccine (Pneumovax®, Prevnar®, Prevnar 13®). However, not everyone who receives the vaccination will have problems. In fact, most people tolerate it quite well. If side effects do occur, in most cases, they are minor and either require no treatment or are treated easily by you or your healthcare provider.
 
(This article covers many, but not all, of the possible pneumonia vaccine side effects. Your healthcare provider can discuss a more complete list with you.)
 
Possible Side Effects of the Pneumonia Vaccine
Three different pneumonia vaccines are available. Pneumovax (pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine) is typically given to older adults, while Prevnar and Prevnar 13 (pneumococcal conjugate vaccine) are usually given to young children. Prevnar 13 is the "new-and-improved" version of Prevnar that should be used in place of the old Prevnar whenever possible.
 
The side effects of the three vaccines are slightly different. This likely reflects differences in the type of side effects seen in the age groups. For instance, irritability and crying are typical reactions with almost any vaccine given to young children, but would be unlikely to occur with adults.
 
The most common side effects seen with Pneumovax are injection site reactions (such as redness, pain, warmth, swelling, or a lump). These reactions occur in about 50 percent of people.
 
(Click Pneumovax Side Effects for more information, including details about less common problems.)
 
The most common side effects seen with Prevnar 13 include:
 
Irritability -- in up to 85.6 percent of children
Sleeping more than usual -- up to 71.5 percent
Tenderness at the injection site -- up to 64.7 percent
Decreased appetite -- up to 51 percent.
 
The most common side effects of Prevnar include:
 
Irritability -- in up to 52.5 percent of children
Drowsiness -- up to 32.9 percent
Fever -- up to 21.1 percent.
7babies4me
by on Jul. 28, 2011 at 8:34 PM

Thank you!  I was just reading something that said 1/3 of all people given this vaccine have some kind of reaction.  I didn't see anything that said it was typically used for older adults. 

I really hope this works.  She's had pneumonia 9 times that I know about and school starts soon.  Cross your fingers!

emmy526
by Emmy on Jul. 28, 2011 at 8:36 PM


Quoting 7babies4me:

Thank you!  I was just reading something that said 1/3 of all people given this vaccine have some kind of reaction.  I didn't see anything that said it was typically used for older adults. 

I really hope this works.  She's had pneumonia 9 times that I know about and school starts soon.  Cross your fingers!

they didn't try synagis on her?  

markrobsmom
by on Jul. 28, 2011 at 8:37 PM

I would call the doc to be safe.

 

7babies4me
by on Jul. 28, 2011 at 8:38 PM

I don't know what synagis is.  She is on daily antibiotics and steroids.  Our next step is an immunologist because they are leaning towards primary immune defiency as a diagnosis. 

emmy526
by Emmy on Jul. 28, 2011 at 8:39 PM

if she is on daily antibtx and  steroids, no wonder she has no immune system left... how long has she been on that regimen?

7babies4me
by on Jul. 28, 2011 at 8:40 PM

Just looked up snyagis. No they haven't tried that.  She hasn't had RSV.  Last time 1/2 of her right lung was full of fluid and 1/3 of her left lung. 

Quoting 7babies4me:

I don't know what synagis is.  She is on daily antibiotics and steroids.  Our next step is an immunologist because they are leaning towards primary immune defiency as a diagnosis. 


7babies4me
by on Jul. 28, 2011 at 9:46 PM

She's only been on that since January.  But the tests were done prior to that.  I have all the medical records the orphanage had on her, but there may be some things they missed.  She was only 2lbs 6oz when she was born.  I've had her 3 years and gotten her past a huge amount of issues, but this one is a really big one and we are still working on a way to keep her healthy enough to go to school with other kids.  The low dose antibiotics seems to be helping. 

Any idea how long the swelling lasts?  I'm still trying to find an answer for that. 

Quoting emmy526:

if she is on daily antibtx and  steroids, no wonder she has no immune system left... how long has she been on that regimen?


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