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Any Restylane Users? Reviews?

Posted by on Sep. 17, 2011 at 11:53 AM
  • 8 Replies

I've been considering getting some work done on some lines (dh says there's nothing there) Well, I see it. So, I've been weighing my options between Botox, Dysport (which has gotten some horrible reviews including droopy eyes), and Restylane.

Of the three I think Restylane seems to be the most noninvasive and side effect free option.

Has anyone had this done? 

What did you think of the results?

 how long did they last?

 how much did you pay?

 

Thanks!

by on Sep. 17, 2011 at 11:53 AM
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Replies (1-8):
itseebitsee
by on Sep. 17, 2011 at 1:47 PM
Bump! No one?
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Bella_Soleil
by on Nov. 17, 2012 at 11:58 PM

I'd love to try but so many mixed reviews

demonica29
by Silver Member on Nov. 18, 2012 at 5:11 PM

How can you call it non-invasive?  It is inserting a needle into (where ever) and then injecting a foreign substance into your body.  Also, if the doctor doesn't think you need it DON'T GET IT!  Starting treatments like that too early will backfire in the end.  BTW, this is what I am in school for, I hope to soon be working in a plastic surgeon's office and things like when to start and why not o start are in our curiculum.

If you are concerned about fine lines, I would go for a series of acid peels.

hmommy07
by on Nov. 18, 2012 at 5:14 PM

acid peels you can buy yourself or the expensive type at a doctor's office?  I've heard those are bad too... and you are gross looking for a whole week.

What about retin A?  I would try that out first and see if it helps

Quoting demonica29:

How can you call it non-invasive?  It is inserting a needle into (where ever) and then injecting a foreign substance into your body.  Also, if the doctor doesn't think you need it DON'T GET IT!  Starting treatments like that too early will backfire in the end.  BTW, this is what I am in school for, I hope to soon be working in a plastic surgeon's office and things like when to start and why not o start are in our curiculum.

If you are concerned about fine lines, I would go for a series of acid peels.


demonica29
by Silver Member on Nov. 18, 2012 at 5:44 PM

There is a whole big world between what you can buy OTC and the doctor only strenth.  There are infinate combinations of different pH's and percentages, as well as different kinds of acids that can be applied by a licensed esthetician with their license, as opposed to the ones that they could apply working under a doctor's license.

The ones that make youlook gross for a week (or longer) are the super heavy duty ones that can only be done under a doctor's supervsion, and yes, if not done properly can cause scarring in certain types of skin.  If you go to a licensed esthetician, they damned better ask you a lot of questions before deciding on a peel for you.  They should also not be doing a peel on your first visit, they should give you a basic, although possibly slightly aggressive facial to se how your skin responds and have you come back in a week.  If an estie wants to just put you in a chair and just jump right into any aggressive treatment thank her very much and go to someone else.

We know exactly how to get the best results for a specific skin type and your specific concerns, we can hoose from 6 AHAs and a BHA or a mixture of more than one of them, demending on what you need.  One of the first questions they should ask is if you have a poblem with visible peeling. 

The stuff you can buy OTC is generally crap.  All of the professionial lines have retail produts for use at home.  The home products will maintain the changes that the professional is causing in your skin,  You won't, however be able to purchase the higher strength products used in the office.  One good line, actually really good, is Dermalogica, which is now available at both Ulta and Beauty brands.

If cost is an issue for you, rather that going to a spa or medspa, you can go to a esthetics school and get the same treatments MUCH more affordably.  Remember that even though it is a student working on you, if they are doing aggressive treatments like peels, they are quite far into their schooling and will be working in a spa soon, where you will have no idea who just graduated.  Plus, there is always an instructor supervising the students' work.

Quoting hmommy07:

acid peels you can buy yourself or the expensive type at a doctor's office?  I've heard those are bad too... and you are gross looking for a whole week.

What about retin A?  I would try that out first and see if it helps

Quoting demonica29:

How can you call it non-invasive?  It is inserting a needle into (where ever) and then injecting a foreign substance into your body.  Also, if the doctor doesn't think you need it DON'T GET IT!  Starting treatments like that too early will backfire in the end.  BTW, this is what I am in school for, I hope to soon be working in a plastic surgeon's office and things like when to start and why not o start are in our curiculum.

If you are concerned about fine lines, I would go for a series of acid peels.



hmommy07
by on Nov. 19, 2012 at 2:38 AM

Thank you! that is great info!

Quoting demonica29:

There is a whole big world between what you can buy OTC and the doctor only strenth.  There are infinate combinations of different pH's and percentages, as well as different kinds of acids that can be applied by a licensed esthetician with their license, as opposed to the ones that they could apply working under a doctor's license.

The ones that make youlook gross for a week (or longer) are the super heavy duty ones that can only be done under a doctor's supervsion, and yes, if not done properly can cause scarring in certain types of skin.  If you go to a licensed esthetician, they damned better ask you a lot of questions before deciding on a peel for you.  They should also not be doing a peel on your first visit, they should give you a basic, although possibly slightly aggressive facial to se how your skin responds and have you come back in a week.  If an estie wants to just put you in a chair and just jump right into any aggressive treatment thank her very much and go to someone else.

We know exactly how to get the best results for a specific skin type and your specific concerns, we can hoose from 6 AHAs and a BHA or a mixture of more than one of them, demending on what you need.  One of the first questions they should ask is if you have a poblem with visible peeling. 

The stuff you can buy OTC is generally crap.  All of the professionial lines have retail produts for use at home.  The home products will maintain the changes that the professional is causing in your skin,  You won't, however be able to purchase the higher strength products used in the office.  One good line, actually really good, is Dermalogica, which is now available at both Ulta and Beauty brands.

If cost is an issue for you, rather that going to a spa or medspa, you can go to a esthetics school and get the same treatments MUCH more affordably.  Remember that even though it is a student working on you, if they are doing aggressive treatments like peels, they are quite far into their schooling and will be working in a spa soon, where you will have no idea who just graduated.  Plus, there is always an instructor supervising the students' work.

Quoting hmommy07:

acid peels you can buy yourself or the expensive type at a doctor's office?  I've heard those are bad too... and you are gross looking for a whole week.

What about retin A?  I would try that out first and see if it helps

Quoting demonica29:

How can you call it non-invasive?  It is inserting a needle into (where ever) and then injecting a foreign substance into your body.  Also, if the doctor doesn't think you need it DON'T GET IT!  Starting treatments like that too early will backfire in the end.  BTW, this is what I am in school for, I hope to soon be working in a plastic surgeon's office and things like when to start and why not o start are in our curiculum.

If you are concerned about fine lines, I would go for a series of acid peels.




AtillaTheHun
by Bronze Member on Nov. 19, 2012 at 3:40 AM

Non-invasive means they don´t have to take her whole face apart, cut some parts out, tuck ui, and stich her back up. A needle hardly constitutes for being invasive...

Quoting demonica29:

How can you call it non-invasive?  It is inserting a needle into (where ever) and then injecting a foreign substance into your body.  Also, if the doctor doesn't think you need it DON'T GET IT!  Starting treatments like that too early will backfire in the end.  BTW, this is what I am in school for, I hope to soon be working in a plastic surgeon's office and things like when to start and why not o start are in our curiculum.

If you are concerned about fine lines, I would go for a series of acid peels.


demonica29
by Silver Member on Nov. 19, 2012 at 9:42 PM

Technically, and legally, anything that pierces the skin is invasive, hence anything that involves a needle is invasive. 

Quoting AtillaTheHun:

Non-invasive means they don´t have to take her whole face apart, cut some parts out, tuck ui, and stich her back up. A needle hardly constitutes for being invasive...

Quoting demonica29:

How can you call it non-invasive?  It is inserting a needle into (where ever) and then injecting a foreign substance into your body.  Also, if the doctor doesn't think you need it DON'T GET IT!  Starting treatments like that too early will backfire in the end.  BTW, this is what I am in school for, I hope to soon be working in a plastic surgeon's office and things like when to start and why not o start are in our curiculum.

If you are concerned about fine lines, I would go for a series of acid peels.



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