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and they want the US and Canada to follow suit.

currently there is a whole generation that has never been spanked.

30 other nations have followed this "trend" also.

I can't find the article since I am mobile.

here's an article. sorry I can't make it clickable.

http://articles.cnn.com/2011-11-09/world/world_sweden-punishment-ban_1_corporal-punishment-elizabeth-gershoff-parents?_s=PM:WORLD
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
by on Nov. 17, 2011 at 9:53 AM
Replies (131-140):
Kris_PBG
by Ruby Member on Nov. 17, 2011 at 10:49 PM

So this paper uncovered an AAP conspiracy?  :)

Quoting NevaehsMomy1013:

ok first off i NEVER  claimed the APP was pro corporal punishment... i said  the source stated that  the AAP  conducted a study and then   did not report the accurate results they found showing  that using  both spanking and timeouts PROPORLY   had the greatest benefit to children  they followed for  a certain number of years.   regardless of their stance on corporal punishment they did not  acknowledge the  fact that  the study THEY conducted showed that  spanking is not this awful thing when used properly. because they didnt want to deal with the  lashing out  of  seeming pro spanking. im going to look again for this damn paper i wrote  so i can find the sources and stop  arguing over this crap.

Quoting Kris_PBG:

That is contrary to AAP's stance.

Quoting NevaehsMomy1013:

no i stated one of my sources was AAP for  OTHER information on corpral punishment  in  the paper i wrote. The information i was talking about  was a study that the APP did  with three groups one was spanking only , one was time out and positive renforcement only and one was time sout and spanking  and the APP found that  the grpoup of children that   had  both spanking and time outs (mostly spanking to reinforce time outs) turned out better then either   soley spanking or soley time outs.  when  teh APP  had to write there report on  corpoal punishment they decided to  leave out this information because they didnt want to seem like they where pro spanking  and  condoning child abuse.... so  no its not false...i just cant remember what source i used  for the switserland  information, i had many sources in  the paper i wrote unfortunatly  i dont have the  binder  that had a copy of my paper and  my lap top that  has the  paper and sources  on it  crashed and is being repaired otherwise i would gladly post   all my sources for you all to see.

Quoting Jsmommy0528:

She also stated her source as AAP  which is false because they are against the use of corporal punishment.

Quoting emeraldangel20:

interesting...looks like that didnt turn out as well as people say it did

Quoting NevaehsMomy1013:

switzerland  did this , and since they did   the generation raised  without spanking had an increase in drug use and  a higher crime rate then the spanking generation just before them.  i had to do a research  paper  in college  on corpral punishment i wish i had a copy of that paper  so i could link   my resources i used.  but its on my  laptop that broke.







NevaehsMomy1013
by on Nov. 17, 2011 at 11:00 PM

my paper  did no such thing my paper just reported the research i found on corporal punishment,  the APP  was confronted about  why they didnt  report the information and commented on how they didnt want to seem pro spanking or like they are condoning child abuse.

sandra_t00
by ChaChi on Nov. 17, 2011 at 11:02 PM


Quoting crafty_love:

oh I don't fucking think so. I RARELY spank my child....BUT if he were to need it...you'd better believe I would do it.

He is MY son and nobody...NOBODY has the right to tell me how to parent!

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Kris_PBG
by Ruby Member on Nov. 17, 2011 at 11:03 PM

Umm - that was a joke - hence the smiley face.

I have never heard of this AAP controversy - and I am going to bed.  You'll have to keep us posted.

Quoting NevaehsMomy1013:

my paper  did no such thing my paper just reported the research i found on corporal punishment,  the APP  was confronted about  why they didnt  report the information and commented on how they didnt want to seem pro spanking or like they are condoning child abuse.


Due9
by your-bff on Nov. 17, 2011 at 11:05 PM

Agree

Quoting Bird16_J:

Thanks but the government already steps enough into my life I don't need them doing any more. I WOULD like to be a parent to my children instead of having good old uncle sam telling me what I can and can't do with MY children.


CafeMom Tickers
mamivon2
by Sandra on Nov. 17, 2011 at 11:05 PM

how can you know if someone spanks their child..

rgba
by Gold Member on Nov. 17, 2011 at 11:34 PM
1 mom liked this
All of these people "against" govt rules for what parents can do are interesting to me. Do you support rules against child molestation? How about beatings? Neglect? Then you support government intervention. As long as it's not something YOU want to do.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
NevaehsMomy1013
by on Nov. 17, 2011 at 11:39 PM

 found  a copy of  my paper and the source  for both  statement i made  one on  the AAP  and the other on the increase  in crime  in another country that has a ban on  corpral punishment....

im having issues loading it  onto here but the information for the source  is ... "The Truth About Spanking" by lawrence diller  national review/april 21,  2008


i will continue to try and get the article  in the post  but its not letting my copy and paste  and the link brings you to  my school  page were you need my  acess  name and password to   reach the  database  this  was in.

Quoting Kris_PBG:

Umm - that was a joke - hence the smiley face.

I have never heard of this AAP controversy - and I am going to bed.  You'll have to keep us posted.

Quoting NevaehsMomy1013:

my paper  did no such thing my paper just reported the research i found on corporal punishment,  the APP  was confronted about  why they didnt  report the information and commented on how they didnt want to seem pro spanking or like they are condoning child abuse.



NevaehsMomy1013
by on Nov. 17, 2011 at 11:49 PM

"The spanking controversy had been heating up for nearly two
decades before the AAP finally decided, in 1996, to take a critical
look at corporal punishment. It held a two-day scientific-consensus
conference at its headquarters in Elk Grove, outside of Chicago. The
findings of the meeting were ultimately published in a special supplement
of the AAP’s journal, Pediatrics, under the title “The Short
and Long Term Consequences of Corporal Punishment.”
The meeting at Elk Grove looked to be the ultimate showdown
between anti-spanking and spanking-is-not-always-bad pundits—
a sociological Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Twenty-three experts in
the field of child rearing were assembled, and both sides gave it
their best shot. Yet the confrontation seemed to end in a draw. Most
of the studies cited on corporal punishment came from a clinical
population—in other words, they dealt with families that had been
referred to mental-health agencies for having physically abused
their children. These findings could not be applied to the general
population. On the other hand, studies looking at the general population
tended to be poorly controlled or retrospective (prospective
studies are generally better at avoiding bias).
The best studies of normal families came from Diana Baumrind,
a highly respected psychologist from the University of California,
Berkeley, who followed healthy middle-class white families
prospectively for 15 years. Families where parents occasionally
employed spanking (defined as one or two open swats on the
bottom of a child between the ages of two and six) as one form of
discipline within an otherwise loving context did marginally better
over the long term than the very few families that abjured spanking
entirely.
The anti-spanking forces offered prospective studies that followed
larger, more varied groups of families that employed spanking
as more typically used by American families—haphazardly and
with anger. In these groups, there were higher rates of mental illness
and violence in the children whose parents used spanking
more frequently.
So the AAP meeting stalemated on spanking. The group could
agree to criticize spanking the way it is practiced by most parents in
America: Based on several studies that demonstrated that limited
spanking is more effective than none when teaching children the
rules of “time out,” the working group could endorse spanking only
for this set of defiant toddlers, and only in this setting. Yet the conference
did have some effect: Its leaders admitted in the Pediatrics
supplement that “we had a preconceived notion that corporal punishment,
including spanking, was innately always ‘bad.’ During the
conference, we became increasingly impressed with the interactive...


NevaehsMomy1013
by on Nov. 17, 2011 at 11:51 PM

nature of corporal punishment, and [concluded] that the issue of
whether spanking is harmful or beneficial to a child must be viewed
within the total context of a child’s life and environment.”
Two years later, the AAP finally issued its guidelines on the discipline
of children. Not surprisingly, it advocated disciplining children
primarily with positive rewards, and held that if punishment
is necessary, the preferred form is the time out. Little mention of
spanking, pro or con, was made in the body of the recommendations,
but, in an addendum, eleven points were raised, all critical of
the practice of spanking and the corporal punishment of children.
The AAP had clearly ignored the more neutral conclusions from
the Elk Grove meeting. Letters to Pediatrics, some from those
who had participated in that meeting, complained that the AAPhad
used only the negative studies on spanking, in order to justify the
proscription in their guidelines.

PEDIATRICIANS AT THE BARRICADES
Also writing in Pediatrics, Mark Wolraich, the head of the committee
that wrote the discipline recommendations, defended the
AAP anti-spanking stance. “It is because most parents spank that
such a policy statement is needed. The AAPis not a police body that
disallows child-rearing techniques. . . . Spanking was only one area
addressed but stands out as one in need of change because of
its ineffectiveness, side effects, and the frequency of its misuse.”
Wolraich made a distinction between the families Baumrind studied
and “real life,” and wrote: “The conclusions needed to guide
practice must come from expert opinion about data different from
that required for a research program. Just as for civil rights in
America, sometimes society, in this case pediatric society, has to
espouse something unpopular before the data is complete (or can
ever be) to lead in raising consciousness.”
Another pediatrician who was part of the committee that wrote
the discipline recommendations later confided in me: “It wasn’t
easy. We knew about the data [that showed spanking to be positive
in some contexts]. But we felt if we included it we’d be open to criticism
for promoting spanking, its misuse, and therefore potentially
increasing the physical abuse of children. The AAPwasn’t ready to
take on that chance or criticism.”
Essentially, then, the AAP decided to ignore the mixed data on
corporal punishment of children in order to pursue a perceived
social good, the end of spanking in America. The AAP statement at
the time generated some, but not much, publicity. It could be seen,
perhaps, as another brick in the wall for society’s case against spanking.
I have noticed, in my practice of behavioral pediatrics over the
years since then, an ever-louder chorus of nays about spanking coming
from parents—even as the practice has continued.
In 2007, a California state legislator, Sally Lieber, inadvertently
initiated an informal poll on the public’s attitudes about spanking.
She proposed criminalizing parents’ spanking their children who
were three years old and younger—and the result was surprising.
The unorganized reaction to her proposal was immediate and great:
Letters poured in to newspapers statewide protesting both the idea
that the government may interfere with private family matters and
the notion that spanking is always bad. Lieber’s own office admitted
that 90 percent of the e-mails she received were against her
proposal. After an attempt at watering it down, she withdrew it,
vowing to try again at another time....."  The Truth About Spanking  Lawrence Diller National Review

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