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And this is why I laugh over IQ posts...

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Four-year-old 'genius' accepted into Mensa with an IQ almost as high as physicist Stephen Hawking 

  • 'Gifted' Heidi Hankins stunned examiners with her extraordinary intelligence
  • Sat Mensa test after nursery staff struggled to find activities to challenge her

By Laura Clark and Rosie Taylor

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By the age of two, she could count to 40, draw pictures of people, recite poems and read books meant for seven-year-olds.

Within a year, she was adding and subtracting.

Now she is four, Heidi Hankins has an IQ of 159 – only one point below Albert Einstein’s – and has become one of the youngest members of Mensa.

A little bit special: Four-year-old Heidi Hankins has an IQ of 159, just one point below Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein

A little bit special: Four-year-old Heidi Hankins has an IQ of 159, just one point below Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein

She took an IQ test after nursery staff struggled to find tasks to stretch her.

And her parents Matthew, 47, a University of Southampton lecturer, and Sophy, 43, an artist, are hoping their daughter can skip a school year when she starts in September.

Heidi sat a Wechsler IQ test, which uses puzzles to measure a child’s intellectual potential.

Dr Hankins said: ‘We always thought Heidi was bright because she was reading early. I was curious about her IQ and the results were off the scale.

‘I got her the complete set of the Oxford Reading Tree books when she was two and she read through the whole set of 30 in about an hour. It’s what you would expect a seven-year-old to do. She was making noises and trying to talk literally since she was born and by age one her vocabulary was quite good. She was using full sentences almost as soon as she started to speak.’

Dr Hankins said Heidi was drawing princesses and animals aged 14 months – an age when most children can only mark the page.

And at 18 months the family found her using the computer to teach herself to read.

 

Heidi is a head taller than her classmates, and at 3ft 10in is closer to an average six year old. The Hankins, from Winchester, Hampshire, also have a nine-year-old son, Isaac, who is a chorister at Winchester Cathedral.

Dr Hankins said: ‘Heidi has really flourished quicker than other children – academically, artistically and physically.




Good company: (L-R) legendary physicist Albert Einstein and Professor Stephen Hawking both have IQs only one point higher than Heidi ay 160 while TV mathematician Carol Vorderman's is 'only' 154

‘We don’t push Heidi at all. She has taken up everything herself and teaches herself.

‘She is not precocious, she is just a little girl who likes her Barbies and Lego but then you will find her sitting down and reading a book.’

The average adult IQ score is 100 while a ‘gifted’ score is 130. John Stevenage, chief executive of British Mensa, said: ‘Heidi’s parents correctly identified that she shows great potential.'


by on Apr. 16, 2012 at 12:00 AM
Replies (21-30):
Cymbeline
by Spock's 2nd Cousin on Apr. 16, 2012 at 1:15 PM
1 mom liked this

There are other benefits, such as chances to socialize with other socially awkward individuals. While there are socially adept people in MENSA, they are the minority.

Quoting alwayskk:

Lol! At least once they get the certificate, no one can take it away from you.

Quoting aviatioNation:

Everyone wants to have an above average IQ, it makes them special. Thought, honestly, I can't help but laugh at the people who spend $63 a year to be able to prove they're special.


"What is a man, if chief good, and market of his time be but to sleep and feed? A beast, no more."  Hamlet

Cymbeline
by Spock's 2nd Cousin on Apr. 16, 2012 at 1:17 PM

The IQ/gifted threads are always quite interesting. I am aware that many are lying, but do not know what they hope to gain from such a fabrication. It's the reason I usually just observe.

As for the child in the OP, I do wonder if her social abilities are impaired. I do hope that her intellectual brilliance doesn't cause painful issues in other aspects of her life.

rosaleeandtwo
by on Apr. 16, 2012 at 1:17 PM
Good for her little smart ass!

Anyone see the House episode where the genius was taking NyQuil every night just to dumb himself down enough to tolerate his rather normal girlfriend? For some reason this story made me think of that lol
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xtwistedxlovex
by Gold Member on Apr. 16, 2012 at 1:23 PM
1 mom liked this

I put little stock in IQ tests. It's very common for very intelligent people to have attention disorders - which are going to affect how well you do the tests. And some people just really suck at tests because of the pressure. I don't think it accurately shows the potential of everyone.

I kind of feel bad for this girl. Who the heck pays $70 to admit a 4yo to a 'special society'? I get the feeling her parents are going to push her and maybe not accept her best as good enough. Will she be allowed to just be a kid? Probably not =(

RhondaVeggie
by on Apr. 16, 2012 at 1:25 PM
1 mom liked this
Neither Hawking or Einstein ever took an IQ test. Hawking doesn't beleive that numerical IQ tests are relevant. I agree with him even though mine was tested in HS. Someone with a high IQ might be a world class scientist or they might be a housewife. Having a high IQ can be an advantage, usually those with a high IQ learn faster and do better on tests, but motivation has a lot more to do with it. I've had people ask me why I'm not curing cancer since I have such a high IQ and I tell them it's because I never went to medical school and I have no interest in biology.

Not all kids with high IQs got to special schools or get pushed either. I could have received a full scholarship to a residential school for profoundly gifted children as a teen but my mother wouldn't let me go. I didn't get any special treatment at school either aside from a few teachers that took a special interest and gave me extra work. There were just as many teachers who assumed I was an idiot because I spent most of their class sitting around bored like my math teacher who regularly told me I wouldn't amount to anything because I spent most of his class time bored silly after finishing up the assignment in a few minutes.

Also, 159 really isn't that high. It's high enough to join Mensa but 1 in 50 have an IQ high enough to join Mensa. The only thing interesting about this story is that she was tested at such a young age. There are plenty of kids who can do that stuff. I was one of them but my mother thought it was normal for kids to be holding conversations with adults by their first birthday and teaching themselves to read at age three so she didn't have me tested.
aviatioNation
by on Apr. 16, 2012 at 3:01 PM

But if you're as smart as Steven Hawking you don't need a certificate to prove it.

Quoting alwayskk:

Lol! At least once they get the certificate, no one can take it away from you.

Quoting aviatioNation:

Everyone wants to have an above average IQ, it makes them special. Thought, honestly, I can't help but laugh at the people who spend $63 a year to be able to prove they're special.


Piskie
by Gold Member on Apr. 16, 2012 at 3:05 PM
It's not meant to show someone's potential in life.
It's the ability to think, use logic and recognise patterns.
That's how intellect is measured.
Who? Patents who want to contact people who've been through the same... It can be very hard when your kid is so gifted.



Quoting xtwistedxlovex:

I put little stock in IQ tests. It's very common for very intelligent people to have attention disorders - which are going to affect how well you do the tests. And some people just really suck at tests because of the pressure. I don't think it accurately shows the potential of everyone.

I kind of feel bad for this girl. Who the heck pays $70 to admit a 4yo to a 'special society'? I get the feeling her parents are going to push her and maybe not accept her best as good enough. Will she be allowed to just be a kid? Probably not =(


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aviatioNation
by on Apr. 16, 2012 at 3:05 PM

I disagree. While Mensa does offer some benefits, they don't offer much oportunity for socializing with others of high IQ because of how spread out the members are.

Quoting Cymbeline:

There are other benefits, such as chances to socialize with other socially awkward individuals. While there are socially adept people in MENSA, they are the minority.

Quoting alwayskk:

Lol! At least once they get the certificate, no one can take it away from you.

Quoting aviatioNation:

Everyone wants to have an above average IQ, it makes them special. Thought, honestly, I can't help but laugh at the people who spend $63 a year to be able to prove they're special.



alwayskk
by on Apr. 16, 2012 at 3:06 PM

Eh, I see nothing wrong with getting your certificate, I would just hope they don't have it framed on their desk or carry it in their wallet. LOL

Quoting aviatioNation:

But if you're as smart as Steven Hawking you don't need a certificate to prove it.

Quoting alwayskk:

Lol! At least once they get the certificate, no one can take it away from you.

Quoting aviatioNation:

Everyone wants to have an above average IQ, it makes them special. Thought, honestly, I can't help but laugh at the people who spend $63 a year to be able to prove they're special.



aviatioNation
by on Apr. 16, 2012 at 3:08 PM

IQ tests don't accurately measure anything except test taking ability. I got 181 on an IQ test, and I KNOW I'm not that smart. I'm just really good at taking tests.

Quoting Piskie:

It's not meant to show someone's potential in life.
It's the ability to think, use logic and recognise patterns.
That's how intellect is measured.
Who? Patents who want to contact people who've been through the same... It can be very hard when your kid is so gifted.



Quoting xtwistedxlovex:

I put little stock in IQ tests. It's very common for very intelligent people to have attention disorders - which are going to affect how well you do the tests. And some people just really suck at tests because of the pressure. I don't think it accurately shows the potential of everyone.

I kind of feel bad for this girl. Who the heck pays $70 to admit a 4yo to a 'special society'? I get the feeling her parents are going to push her and maybe not accept her best as good enough. Will she be allowed to just be a kid? Probably not =(



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