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would you consider a child with asthma to be a special needs child?

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The military base is holding a support group for parents of special needs children. Hubs captain made him aware of the meeting because our son is in the Efmp program. Its a program for families who have dependents who have issues requiring medical care.basically it ensures that should the military move you, they're not moving you to a place your family member can't go.

Anyway, I told dh that I'm not going to that meeting. I don't consider asthma to be a special need.

Dh shrugged his shoulders and said well. Its there if you want.to go.

Id feel like a dumbass. Parents who have truly special needs kids being there and when they call my name..oh he has asthma. Wouldn't that be a huge slap in the face to them??

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by on May. 4, 2012 at 8:04 AM
Replies (81-90):
baquick
by on May. 4, 2012 at 11:24 AM
I prob wouldn't either.

Quoting GreenEyePixie:

This. Honestly it would depend on the severity. But to be honest even if it was mild and you came to the meeting, I wouldn't even blink an eye at it.



Quoting baquick:

I think it depends on the severity of the asthma. If its debilitating then yes, but if its manageable, then no.


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Dzyre1115
by Desiree` on May. 4, 2012 at 11:24 AM

 You need to be part of that program to get special considerations in the military so why would anyone be offended if you go to the meeting.  It seems like the meeting is more a support group for the navigation of said program, so if you qualify for the program, you need the meeting....

Quoting mackQuin:

 thank you all for your input. I called the family advocacy center on base to tell them my concerns.

The guy kind of chuckled a bit and said "i wonder if this is why we do not have a lot of people showing up to these things". I guess there may be a lot of people who don't want to step on toes of those who have kids/spouses with severely limiting conditions.

I still don't know if i am going to go, although i DO have questions about EFMP. I think i will try walking into that office first.. but he said that for future purposes they won't call them "special needs" meetings but more like EFMP support meetings.

Apparently i'm the only one to bring it up, but judging by this post a lot of people would take offense to someone with asthma showing up to a special needs support group, but apparently that is not what the group is about..it encompasses all those who are enrolled into the EFMP program, and not just severely imparied children.

 

 

mackQuin
by on May. 4, 2012 at 11:25 AM

 

Quoting Dzyre1115:

 We just don't treat the asthma issues in this family as a disability.  Like I said we've been dealing with asthma for decades.  It's part of our lives and to be frank we're probably, at this stage of the game, more proficient at caring for and treating asthma than say a new mother who's never dealt with it before......

 Oh, i have dealt with it for ever. We dont' treat it as such either, in fact his lung doctor loves that i don't hold him back.

His asthma is bad.

For military purposes though, it is mandatory he be in this program. When choosing assignments, they have to make sure its a place suitable for my son. For example he cannot go to Minot, any place in Alaska or Japan. (among other places) With the EFMP my husband is qcoded and it will instantly bring that up..the miltiary can then send him on alone, or choose another assignment for us all to follow him on.

Does that make sense? lol. I don't know if i'm explaining it right, but that is how it was explained to me.

Dzyre1115
by Desiree` on May. 4, 2012 at 11:30 AM

 I think you should go to the meeting, I'm a cripple, literally and I have a special needs child, I would not be offended if I was at the meeting and so were you.  If you need the program to assure comfortable living for a child with a chronic illness, you need to be there.  Like I said I think it sounds more like support of those who have to use the program, you may learn some stuff you really need to know.  You know tools to work your way through the program.

Quoting mackQuin:

 

Quoting Dzyre1115:

 We just don't treat the asthma issues in this family as a disability.  Like I said we've been dealing with asthma for decades.  It's part of our lives and to be frank we're probably, at this stage of the game, more proficient at caring for and treating asthma than say a new mother who's never dealt with it before......

 Oh, i have dealt with it for ever. We dont' treat it as such either, in fact his lung doctor loves that i don't hold him back.

His asthma is bad.

For military purposes though, it is mandatory he be in this program. When choosing assignments, they have to make sure its a place suitable for my son. For example he cannot go to Minot, any place in Alaska or Japan. (among other places) With the EFMP my husband is qcoded and it will instantly bring that up..the miltiary can then send him on alone, or choose another assignment for us all to follow him on.

Does that make sense? lol. I don't know if i'm explaining it right, but that is how it was explained to me.

 

momof3_2011
by on May. 4, 2012 at 11:32 AM

No I would not consider it being special needs

Mipsy
by Platinum Member on May. 4, 2012 at 11:37 AM
Yeah this is us too.

Quoting .Angel.Eyes.:

My Ds is a special needs child with asthma, it's not his asthma that makes him special needs.

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LectioDivina
by on May. 4, 2012 at 12:16 PM

You sound like my Mom and her siblings with Aspergers . It's a set of three sisters and a brother , all of which had a kid with Aspergers and none of them would consider it a special need...I guess it is better to see it that way than the opposite

Quoting Dzyre1115:

 I think it's a matter of perspective, asthma is a huge part of this family as not one family unit within our extended family does not have at least one, if not more, persons with asthma.  If we made it a special needs issue our lives would be completely taken over.  I mean I have Sunday dinner every week here in the house, thirteen people, my mother, my two sisters and our families, three of thirteen have asthma.  Life goes on, can it kill you, sure but it's just never been at the forefront of our world.  Since it's been such a huge part of us, for so many years, we may just handle it better than some.

Quoting LectioDivina:

But obviously if you have an oxygen tank you have a special need and need to be differently careful than most when you go places

Quoting Dzyre1115:

 My Mother's oxygen tanks don't hinder her, as a matter of fact they've given her more freedom and a better quality of life.

Quoting emmy526:

would an oxygen tank on an asthmatic help change your mind?  That happened to my father....there are different classes of special needs people..not everyone is lumped together.  an asthmatic's special needs are obviously a lot different than someone who has autism and has their own special needs.  

Quoting Dzyre1115:

 Thank you doctor.....my mother and son both suffer from asthma!  I know the risks, I still would not classify them in the same category as a special needs person.

Quoting emmy526:

it is life threatening when your asthma meds don't work and you are turning blue from lack of oxygen...an attack can come at any time for an asthmatic, even in situations where you think it is under control.  

Quoting Dzyre1115:

 I have a child with Asthma and a child with Autism and I don't consider them in the same category at all.  Asthma is something you manage....not usually a life altering issue.


 


 


 


writingafwife
by on May. 4, 2012 at 2:46 PM
Quoting nellierice:



It should be in your medical clinic. Hopes that helps
Mommy2BeAmy
by on May. 4, 2012 at 2:49 PM

No they are not special needs, they usually have their inhaler and if they get a big attack then people do what most people do in ANY emergency situation and call for help

Thelmama
by Ruby Member on May. 4, 2012 at 2:49 PM

It depends on the severity of the asthma and how it effects daily living etc.  My son's asthma used to be very severe.  Sometimes, just walking brought on an attack.  So it depends on the kid and how it effects them. He never let it stp  him though, LOL.  He has not had an asthma attack in 2 years!  Woot Woot.

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