Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

The CafeMom Newcomers Club The CafeMom Newcomers Club

Has anyone ever gotten listeria while pregnant?

Posted by on Nov. 19, 2012 at 2:15 PM
  • 10 Replies

What did it feel like? What ended up happening to you and your baby????


Lilypie Maternity tickers

by on Nov. 19, 2012 at 2:15 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
LuLuRex
by Silver Member on Nov. 19, 2012 at 4:59 PM

I didn't and don't know anyone who got it.

bamababe1975
by Stephanie on Nov. 20, 2012 at 12:34 PM

 No, but I did contract another infection with my 2nd pregnancy and lost the baby. I think the outcome is good if you are diagnosed and treated early on. If you suspect you have listeria, see your doctor immediately.


Love Giving Advice? Join Our Advice Squad!



shaunaleigh418
by Platinum Member on Nov. 20, 2012 at 12:36 PM
I'm too lazy to Google. What's listeria?
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
TrouserMouse
by on Nov. 20, 2012 at 12:38 PM

 Nope, and I had kids before the concern about listeria was ever spoke about.  I ate lunch meat.  I lived off of Subway my first pregnancy.  I have never had it.  I never heated up anything.  This was the first pregnancy that I even had an awareness that it was an issue. I still eat lunch meat.

grey7399
by on Nov. 20, 2012 at 12:44 PM

I don't mind googling...


How could listeriosis affect me and my baby?

Unless you have some underlying disease that affects your immune system, it's unlikely for listeriosis to seriously affect your health. But even if it doesn't make you seriously ill, the infection can have grave consequences for your developing baby, especially if you're not treated promptly.

Listeria can infect the placenta, the amniotic fluid, and the baby, and can causemiscarriage or stillbirth. Infected babies who survive are likely to be born prematurely. Many will be born severely ill or get sick soon after birth, with problems that can include blood infection, difficulty breathing, fever, skin sores, lesions on multiple organs, and central nervous system infections such as meningitis.

Some newborns of infected mothers appear healthy at birth and first have signs of infection, usually meningitis, a week or even several weeks after delivery. This so-called "late-onset listeriosis" may be the result of a baby becoming infected during labor and birth (an infected woman may harbor the bacteria in her cervix, vagina, or gastrointestinal tract), or, more rarely, from transmission from a source other than the mother.

Unfortunately, many infected babies will die or suffer long-term consequences.

luvmymonkeys27
by on Nov. 20, 2012 at 12:46 PM

I didn't get listeria, but I contracted E. coli when I was pregnant with my daughter (about 20 weeks). I started having severe contractions and was worried I was going to miscarry, but didn't.

mkh615
by on Nov. 20, 2012 at 1:12 PM

:-/ I know all the facts about Listeria. I'm an L&D nurse... I was just wondering about the personal experiences and what it actually felt like coming from an actual person instead of a book. Thank you very much for googling it for me though.

Quoting grey7399:

I don't mind googling...


How could listeriosis affect me and my baby?

Unless you have some underlying disease that affects your immune system, it's unlikely for listeriosis to seriously affect your health. But even if it doesn't make you seriously ill, the infection can have grave consequences for your developing baby, especially if you're not treated promptly.

Listeria can infect the placenta, the amniotic fluid, and the baby, and can causemiscarriage or stillbirth. Infected babies who survive are likely to be born prematurely. Many will be born severely ill or get sick soon after birth, with problems that can include blood infection, difficulty breathing, fever, skin sores, lesions on multiple organs, and central nervous system infections such as meningitis.

Some newborns of infected mothers appear healthy at birth and first have signs of infection, usually meningitis, a week or even several weeks after delivery. This so-called "late-onset listeriosis" may be the result of a baby becoming infected during labor and birth (an infected woman may harbor the bacteria in her cervix, vagina, or gastrointestinal tract), or, more rarely, from transmission from a source other than the mother.

Unfortunately, many infected babies will die or suffer long-term consequences.



Lilypie Maternity tickers

grey7399
by on Nov. 20, 2012 at 1:41 PM

OOPS sorry.

Quoting mkh615:

:-/ I know all the facts about Listeria. I'm an L&D nurse... I was just wondering about the personal experiences and what it actually felt like coming from an actual person instead of a book. Thank you very much for googling it for me though.

Quoting grey7399:

I don't mind googling...


How could listeriosis affect me and my baby?

Unless you have some underlying disease that affects your immune system, it's unlikely for listeriosis to seriously affect your health. But even if it doesn't make you seriously ill, the infection can have grave consequences for your developing baby, especially if you're not treated promptly.

Listeria can infect the placenta, the amniotic fluid, and the baby, and can causemiscarriage or stillbirth. Infected babies who survive are likely to be born prematurely. Many will be born severely ill or get sick soon after birth, with problems that can include blood infection, difficulty breathing, fever, skin sores, lesions on multiple organs, and central nervous system infections such as meningitis.

Some newborns of infected mothers appear healthy at birth and first have signs of infection, usually meningitis, a week or even several weeks after delivery. This so-called "late-onset listeriosis" may be the result of a baby becoming infected during labor and birth (an infected woman may harbor the bacteria in her cervix, vagina, or gastrointestinal tract), or, more rarely, from transmission from a source other than the mother.

Unfortunately, many infected babies will die or suffer long-term consequences.



mkh615
by on Nov. 20, 2012 at 1:52 PM

Hey, I appreciate the effort! It's better than when people actually answer with "I haven't had it." *crickets...* Then why did you answer? Anyway, I feel a lot better today. I think I'm in denial that labor is going to start even earlier this time around and what I'm experiencing is the good old body prep before the baby decides to move out.

Quoting grey7399:

OOPS sorry.

Quoting mkh615:

:-/ I know all the facts about Listeria. I'm an L&D nurse... I was just wondering about the personal experiences and what it actually felt like coming from an actual person instead of a book. Thank you very much for googling it for me though.

Quoting grey7399:

I don't mind googling...


How could listeriosis affect me and my baby?

Unless you have some underlying disease that affects your immune system, it's unlikely for listeriosis to seriously affect your health. But even if it doesn't make you seriously ill, the infection can have grave consequences for your developing baby, especially if you're not treated promptly.

Listeria can infect the placenta, the amniotic fluid, and the baby, and can causemiscarriage or stillbirth. Infected babies who survive are likely to be born prematurely. Many will be born severely ill or get sick soon after birth, with problems that can include blood infection, difficulty breathing, fever, skin sores, lesions on multiple organs, and central nervous system infections such as meningitis.

Some newborns of infected mothers appear healthy at birth and first have signs of infection, usually meningitis, a week or even several weeks after delivery. This so-called "late-onset listeriosis" may be the result of a baby becoming infected during labor and birth (an infected woman may harbor the bacteria in her cervix, vagina, or gastrointestinal tract), or, more rarely, from transmission from a source other than the mother.

Unfortunately, many infected babies will die or suffer long-term consequences.





Lilypie Maternity tickers

phantomphan
by PrincessBcake on Nov. 20, 2012 at 2:04 PM
a friend did at about 32 weeks. the baby was stillborn.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN