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Sending son to preschool?

Posted by on Dec. 30, 2012 at 2:12 AM
  • 34 Replies
I am on the fence about sending my son to preschool next year but if I do I have looked into a couple different programs (he will be 3 in April). Program 1:
He will be in school 2 days a week for the first year (2 1/2 hour days) and the second year 3 days a week.

Program 2:
He will be in school 4 days a week (2 1/2 hours a day).

Both programs cost about the same. I am also going to finish up my bachelors and take the classes I have been putting off since I actually have to go to the class. This means I may (hopefully not though) put him in daycare a few hours of the day while I am there if my class times dont go with his preschool times. What would you do? He has never been I. Any daycare or childcare setting.
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by on Dec. 30, 2012 at 2:12 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Kris_PBG
by Ruby Member on Dec. 30, 2012 at 2:14 AM

We would need a LOT more information about the programs to determine which one would be better...


Kris_PBG
by Ruby Member on Dec. 30, 2012 at 2:15 AM

How do the two compare when looking at this article?


What is High-Quality Pre-K?

Organization: National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER)


When you walk into a high-quality pre-kindergarten program, you immediately see learning occurring. Children are engaged in small groups reading books, building interesting structures with blocks, and determining what sinks and what floats at the water table. The teachers are asking questions, pointing out children's successes and guiding learning. The room has a sense of purpose, organization, and excitement.

High quality pre-k programs can be found in many settings: schools, churches, mosques, synagogues, Head Starts, and public and private child care centers. Unless a state makes a commitment to building and funding a pre-k system, however, families have trouble finding well designed, high-quality programs that prepare their children for kindergarten, elementary school, and beyond. Research shows that children who attend high-quality pre-k programs perform better in school and throughout life. They have more advanced language and math skills and enter kindergarten knowing how "school" works. The National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) has created a ten-point checklist that rates the quality of pre-k programs nationwide. The key components of a high-quality program include:

Well Educated Teachers 

The professional development of teachers is related to the quality of early childhood programs. The most effective pre-k teachers have bachelor's degrees and specialized training in early childhood education-and they are paid salaries and benefits comparable to K-12 teachers. Highly educated pre-k teachers are more likely to develop a responsive and strong interpersonal relationship with each child which affects the young child's motivation to learn, social competence and school achievement. Pre-k aides should at a minimum have a Child Development Associate Credential and both the teacher and aide should devote at least 15 hours every year to improve their skills through comprehensive, well designed professional development opportunities.

Low Teacher-Child Ratios and Small Class Size 

Young children learn best in small groups (no more than 20 children) in which they can ask and answer questions and receive individualized teacher attention. When the group size is small, children are more likely to initiate activities on their own. Teachers with fewer children in the group are less restrictive and controlling, more supportive of each child's learning style and have time to extend children's language, guide children's social interactions, and encourage exploration and problem solving. A ratio of one teacher for every ten or fewer children is crucial.

Research-Based Curriculum Aligned to K-12 Standards 

The curriculum helps the teacher organize daily learning activities. While no one curriculum has been identified as best, high-quality pre-k programs have a curriculum with specific goals that integrate learning across all aspects of a child's development-cognitive, physical, social, and emotional. A good curriculum provides a variety of daily opportunities for language and reasoning, science, math, block play, dramatic play, art, and music. Throughout the day, children learn through whole class activities, small groups, and individual interactions with the teacher.

Engaged Families 

Parents and extended family members are an integral part of the program. Teachers create multiple ways to share information about the children's strengths and successes, favorite activities and learning progress. Family members are offered a variety of ways to be involved in the pre-k program: parent conferences and home visits, serving as decision makers on the governing board, assisting in the classroom, helping with field trips, sharing expertise or coming to the class to be with their child. Most importantly, families are respected as the child's first and most important teachers and are supported in their efforts to extend the child's learning at home.

Focus on the Whole Child and Family

Children cannot learn if they are undernourished or if they cannot see the pictures in a book or hear what the teacher says to them because of undiagnosed problems. Programs should screen children's vision, hearing, and general health in order to identify problems and make appropriate referrals early. When needed, families should have access to social services or to information about nutrition, parenting, and family support. Pre-k programs should offer children breakfast and/or lunch in order to ensure proper nutrition.

beadingmom17
by Rachel on Dec. 30, 2012 at 2:15 AM
I would probably do the 2 day one. I sub a lot at my DD's preschool. The 3 year old program is only 2 days and that's usually enough for the kids. It can be overwhelming for kids who haven't been in large group settings like that before.
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doulala
by on Dec. 30, 2012 at 2:15 AM

What are the programs?

Kris_PBG
by Ruby Member on Dec. 30, 2012 at 2:16 AM

Or this list:

If your child is between the ages of 3 and 6 and attends a child care center, preschool, or kindergarten program, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) suggests you look for these 10 signs to make sure your child is in a good classroom.

  1. Children spend most of their playing and working with materials or other children. They do not wander aimlessly, and they are not expected to sit quietly for long periods of time.
  2. Children have access to various activities throughout the day. Look for assorted building blocks and other construction materials, props for pretend play, picture books, paints and other art materials, and table toys such as matching games, pegboards, and puzzles. Children should not all be doing the same thing at the same time.
  3. Teachers work with individual children, small groups, and the whole group at different times during the day. They do not spend all their time with the whole group.
  4. The classroom is decorated with children's original artwork, their own writing with invented spelling, and stories dictated by children to teachers.
  5. Children learn numbers and the alphabet in the context of their everyday experiences. The natural world of plants and animals and meaningful activities like cooking, taking attendance, or serving snack provide the basis for learning activities.
  6. Children work on projects and have long periods of time (at least one hour) to play and explore. Worksheets are used little if at all.
  7. Children have an opportunity to play outside every day. Outdoor play is never sacrificed for more instructional time.
  8. Teachers read books to children individually or in small groups throughout the day, not just at group story time.
  9. Curriculum is adapted for those who are ahead as well as those who need additional help. Teachers recognize that children's different background and experiences mean that they do not learn the same things at the same time in the same way.
  10. Children and their parents look forward to school. Parents feel secure about sending their child to the program. Children are happy to attend; they do not cry regularly or complain of feeling sick.

Also ask if the program is accredited by NAEYC. NAEYCaccredited programs complete a rigorous selfstudy and external review to prove that they meet standards of excellence in early childhood education.

frndlyfn
by Emerald Member on Dec. 30, 2012 at 2:17 AM

I like the 2nd one personally.  Sets them up with more consistent school days so they become used to it for when they hit kindergarten.  I am just going by what you told me.  I worked for a low income preschool and 3 /4 yr olds both came 4 days a week.  3 yr olds in morning and 4 yr olds in afternoon unless of course there was a field trip, then one of the ages had a day off.

Crazylovingfam
by on Dec. 30, 2012 at 2:24 AM
One is thru the private schools in our area and one is thru the public schools. I am avoiding ones I. Daycare settings


Quoting doulala:

What are the programs?


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Crazylovingfam
by on Dec. 30, 2012 at 2:27 AM
Neither of them are for low income. They are both expensive lol. But I do like the fact it is lined up with days of school but our kindergarten only goes 2 days one week, 3 days the next (one a alternating schedule) so it won't help him too much


Quoting frndlyfn:

I like the 2nd one personally.  Sets them up with more consistent school days so they become used to it for when they hit kindergarten.  I am just going by what you told me.  I worked for a low income preschool and 3 /4 yr olds both came 4 days a week.  3 yr olds in morning and 4 yr olds in afternoon unless of course there was a field trip, then one of the ages had a day off.


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frndlyfn
by Emerald Member on Dec. 30, 2012 at 2:35 AM

I realized yours most likely wasnt.  I was just stating where i worked.   Our kindergarten is full day ( 9am -3:35pm) m-f.   I would look at their curriculum as others have said and see which may fit with your beliefs.

Quoting Crazylovingfam:

Neither of them are for low income. They are both expensive lol. But I do like the fact it is lined up with days of school but our kindergarten only goes 2 days one week, 3 days the next (one a alternating schedule) so it won't help him too much


Quoting frndlyfn:

I like the 2nd one personally.  Sets them up with more consistent school days so they become used to it for when they hit kindergarten.  I am just going by what you told me.  I worked for a low income preschool and 3 /4 yr olds both came 4 days a week.  3 yr olds in morning and 4 yr olds in afternoon unless of course there was a field trip, then one of the ages had a day off.



Cherish77
by Cherish on Dec. 30, 2012 at 6:18 AM
I put ds in pre-school @ 3. It was 4 days a week for 3 hours, he had so much fun and learned so much, he is in kindergarten now and at the top of his class.
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