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Buying a house. Which choice would you go with? poll

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Poll

Question: Choice A-super high pressure, excellent schools that yields success. But high pressure could be bad also; high home prices. (but we would do this only to insure great education for our kids) Choice B- very good schools, better home prices.

Options:

Choice A

Choice B


Only group members can vote in this poll.

Total Votes: 94

View Results

Choice A- very nice area which means higher prices for average-nice homes, in the city which is what we like, very close to dh's job, very competitive public schools with wealthy kids and much pressure to achieve (so much pressure that it worries my how this will effect our kids if they don't fit in).

Choice B- suburb (not in city) which is okay with us but we like city better, average home price for great homes, further drive to dh's work, excellent public schools and more laid back competition between students than choice A, but so not as much pressure to succeed which could mean less chance of going to college.

juggling

by on Jan. 18, 2013 at 7:48 PM
Replies (21-30):
Bax
by on Jan. 18, 2013 at 9:39 PM

If both districts are good, it is my opinion that college enrollment has more to do with the child and how much the family values higher education than the pressure a public school places on its students.

Case in point, 5 friends of mine. We met as kindergarten moms. All our kids (13 kids including all siblings) all went to one of the best districts in our area.  Out of the 13 kids; All of the siblings in 3 of the families graduated from college.  In 1 family neither kid went to college & in fact 1 kid didn't graduate from high school, in the last family 1 is currently in college the rest didn't attend.  So, what made the difference? In the 3 families where all the siblings graduated from college, in all 3 both parents were college graduates.  In the family where neither child went, neither parent went.  In the family where 1 child went and the rest didn't, 1 parent was a college graduate, the other parent dropped out.  See a pattern? 

So, my advice?  Buy the house you like in the neighborhood you like.

Due9
by on Jan. 18, 2013 at 10:49 PM

Thank you for your reply. Yes, I do see a pattern and both dh and I are college graduates and value education more than anything. Your reply makes me feel better.

Quoting Bax:

If both districts are good, it is my opinion that college enrollment has more to do with the child and how much the family values higher education than the pressure a public school places on its students.

Case in point, 5 friends of mine. We met as kindergarten moms. All our kids (13 kids including all siblings) all went to one of the best districts in our area.  Out of the 13 kids; All of the siblings in 3 of the families graduated from college.  In 1 family neither kid went to college & in fact 1 kid didn't graduate from high school, in the last family 1 is currently in college the rest didn't attend.  So, what made the difference? In the 3 families where all the siblings graduated from college, in all 3 both parents were college graduates.  In the family where neither child went, neither parent went.  In the family where 1 child went and the rest didn't, 1 parent was a college graduate, the other parent dropped out.  See a pattern? 

So, my advice?  Buy the house you like in the neighborhood you like.


juggling

143myboys9496
by Gold Member on Jan. 18, 2013 at 10:58 PM

 Who says less pressure they won't go to college? We moved to a small town, very low competition, my eldest just graduated and is attending a very good college for his major, New England Institute of Art.

My neighbor's son, graduated with my eldest, was a honor student, (my son was not an honor student), and is attending a wonderful school. Mass College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.

It's all up to the child. You can't credit or blame competition or the lack thereof because your child doesn't go to college.

I'd go with "B", I'm not a city fan, and I'm also not a fan of being "house poor".

boys2men2soon
by Silver Member on Jan. 18, 2013 at 11:01 PM

B for me.    I prefer the 'burbs to the city.    Good schools are important, but I agree that too much pressure is not ideal.    

waffa
by on Jan. 18, 2013 at 11:03 PM

B right here; the drive for success comes primarily from home, so makes no diff where you live as it isn't the school that has the responsibility to push your kids.

ninipanini
by Ruby Member on Jan. 20, 2013 at 6:59 AM

 i agree with you,

b because I myself am a slacker, though i went to college

the first choice sounds like more work and stress and pressure for everyone, and like it entails a lot of 'keeping up with the jones', i've never minded fitting in and would not blend well there

but these are my experiences coming out

a lot of folks thrive on anxiety inducing environment, lol

Quoting noahscott:

I said B because you don't have to be in the most competitive school to go to college. I didn't even graduate high school.. got my GED and I'm in a very nice private college now. Grades make the student not the money. and a good neighborhood is the most important thing to me.

 

RunningMommaof2
by on Jan. 20, 2013 at 7:02 AM
1 mom liked this
It sounds like you really want A. If that's true, then get the house you want. Personally, I need the country and open spaces! Lol
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DomesticDoll
by on Jan. 20, 2013 at 7:41 AM
You can always do an inner district transfer to keep the kids in good school district if you decide to move somewhere away from the "good" schools.
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Carmel63
by Member on Jan. 20, 2013 at 8:49 AM

A.  You like the city, and it is a better school district.  I am not sure why this is a debate in your head.


I have faced this decision, only the high pressure school district was in a suburb.  I haven't regretted the decision.  There is a lot of pressure to succeed, but not only do all the graduates get accepted to college, most get accepted to top tier colleges.  A high precentage also get merit scholarships.

davnrori
by on Jan. 20, 2013 at 9:25 AM

 I think I would need more info before making a decision. How long are you planning to stay in the home? What is the average time that a home in each area stays on the market before being sold? What is the average resale price? Is the amount of money you're saving by living in the city, gas because DH work is closer, convenience to stores, entertainment, etc., enough to make up for the higher home price? What is the percentage of students that go on to college from the city school vs. the suburban school? What are the extracurricular and volunteer opportunities like (both are important for college apps) at the city school vs. the suburban school?

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