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children who have issues with low registration PIOG

Posted by on Feb. 1, 2013 at 12:40 PM
  • 7 Replies

I just had my meeting with a OT from babies can't wait. She said that my 2yo DD has an issue with low registration and something to do with her oral sensory (Why her speech is so delayed). Am I alone with these problems? Are there any other moms on here dealing with the same problems?

Thank you for your time.

by on Feb. 1, 2013 at 12:40 PM
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Replies (1-7):
notjstasocermom
by Samantha on Feb. 1, 2013 at 1:24 PM

low registration?

notjstasocermom
by Samantha on Feb. 1, 2013 at 1:27 PM


I have never heard of it.

Quoting mavery523:


its a sensory issue

Quoting notjstasocermom:

low registration?





Cafe Amanda
by Member on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:07 PM

Like she's sensory-seeking? Has low oral muscle tone (hypotonia)?

Cafe Amanda
by Member on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:09 PM

Will she be getting OT and/or speech therapy then? Has she ever had feeding issues? My younger son (4) has a speech delay that seems oral-motor related, and my older one has low oral muscle tone (but he had no speech delay). Let me know if you have any questions - I can try to answer!

mavery523
by Member on Feb. 1, 2013 at 2:22 PM

 

She is getting OT and ST. She always has to have something in her mouth. She also eats hair. She just started talking within the last few weeks.

I would love to learn as much as I can so I can know how to help her.

Rosalee is 28 months old.

Quoting Cafe Amanda:

Will she be getting OT and/or speech therapy then? Has she ever had feeding issues? My younger son (4) has a speech delay that seems oral-motor related, and my older one has low oral muscle tone (but he had no speech delay). Let me know if you have any questions - I can try to answer!


 

frndlyfn
by Emerald Member on Feb. 2, 2013 at 12:30 AM

Low registration refers to a pattern of sensory processing that is characterized by high sensory thresholds and a passive self regulation strategy (Dunn, 1997); when people have a low registration pattern of sensory processing, they notice sensory stimuli much less than others. The Sensory Profile measures cover the life span, and use informant report to evaluate a person’s ability to register sensory input. People who have low registration patterns seem uninterested, self absorbed and sometimes dull in affect. They do not notice what is going on around them, and miss cues that might guide their behaviors. We hypothesize that most events in daily life do not contain a sufficient amount of intensity to meet these children’s thresholds; their passive strategies lead to them being somewhat oblivious to activities. Dunn and colleagues have conducted national studies of infants, children and adults with and without disabilities, and have found that persons without disabilities of all ages notice and register sensory input most of the time, and that people with disabilities such as autism and schizophrenia are significantly more likely to experience low registration. When a person has low registration patterns, interventions are directed at increasing the intensity of sensory input to improve the chances for noticing and responding to environmental demands.

References(s):
Dunn, W. (1997). The impact of sensory processing abilities on the daily lives of young children and their families: a conceptual model. Infants and Young Children, 9(4), 23-35.

Suggested Reading(s):
Dunn, W. (2001). The sensations of everyday life: theoretical, conceptual and pragmatic considerations. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 55, 608-620.

Return to Sensory Processing Concepts

frndlyfn
by Emerald Member on Feb. 2, 2013 at 12:31 AM

As far as i know dd does not have this but she has a few delays which we and the school have been working on getting her up to speed. She is in 1st grade and very smart.  Frustrating when it is hard to understand what she is trying to tell you.

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