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 Celiac disease.I'm glad we finally know for certain what is/was wrong with his stomach,but now I am arguing with my husband.Because he doesn't think we should alter the diet at home at all....

 The doctor told us it is difficult to put a kid on a STRICT gluten-free diet because the child is not with his/her parents all the time.And,so at some point will end up eating something with gluten in it.My husband took this to mean that Brian shouldn't be on a gluten-free diet at home...HUH?I don't like seeing Brian sick and removing the gluten will fix it,so don't worry,my whole household will be eating gluten free by the end of the month. I don't understand how guys think most of the time...It will be hard to do,so don't bother?

 Just venting.Carry on.



Thought for the day :


 Women are angels and when someone breaks our wings we simply continue to fly...on a broomstick. We are flexible that way.

by on Feb. 12, 2013 at 12:15 PM
Replies (51-60):
brandyblx
by Platinum Member on Feb. 14, 2013 at 10:30 AM

BUMP!

JasonsMom2007
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 11:51 AM
I had no clue either


Quoting Jers.:

I had no idea! I eat whole grain wheat bread at least four times a week! 



Quoting JasonsMom2007:

Nope the first thing my holistic doctor does is puts everybody on a gluten free, sugar free, junk free diet.

Start reading about wheat. It is actually quite bad for you.





Quoting Jers.:

I thought it was unhealthy for someone to go gluten-free, unless medically necessary.







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eema.gray
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 11:59 AM

How old is he?   Most kids, by the time they are three or four, can correlate something they ate with their tummies hurting.  I would think that if your son is used to eating a strict GF diet, he will quickly learn that gluten makes his belly hurt and will choose not to eat it of his own accord.  

Also, you might teach him to make the decision knowingly.  I had to give up gluten last fall.  I'm a bread baker from a family of cooks who pride themselves on the quality of their bread.  I decided that most of the time, eating gluten simply isn't worth the 5 weeks of itchy rash I get on my knees after eating it.  But for bread of the superb quality my brother bakes, I'll make an exception a few times a year.  His sourdough truly is worth the rash.  :-)  Your son should be able to learn to apply that thought process to a friend's birthday pizza and cake.  He might decide that the pizza is worth tummy problems but the cake isn't worth it.  He may decide that sharing his best  friend's birthday pizza and cake is worth while, because it's his best friend, but the rest of the time, it's not worth tummy trouble.  

Bottom line, it's his tummy and he'll have to live with gluten free for the rest of his life so it's best to help him learn to make healthy decisions as early as possible.  At home, he should definitely be 100% gluten free.  Home is a safe place, where he should know that you'll look out for him and feed him the best food possible.

eema.gray
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 12:02 PM

Long term, like decades of poor eating, can cause problems with memory and symptoms usually diagnosed as MS, Parkinson's, and other devestating neuro disorders.  If you can find the research and give to your husband, do you think he would read it and understand how serious this is?


Quoting brandyblx:

 When the doctor told us that a gluten allergy can cause a malabsorption of protein and even mess with the kid's attention span...just,wow.

Quoting Jynnifer292:

 Does your husband realize how damaging it would be to his health to continue eating something that is causing his body to eat away at his own intestines? Not only that, it causes neurological issues also. It doesn't mean that your DH can't eat whatever he wants when he is out or have things at home that ds can't eat, but ds should not eat gluten at all.




"I am only one, but I am still one; I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do." ~~ Edward Everett Hale 1822-1909
brandyblx
by Platinum Member on Feb. 14, 2013 at 1:54 PM

 This is actually the one thing that is part of the problem.My hubby is Bolivan and he reads very little English.I have bee having a rough time finding anything written about Celiac in spanish.

Quoting eema.gray:

Long term, like decades of poor eating, can cause problems with memory and symptoms usually diagnosed as MS, Parkinson's, and other devestating neuro disorders.  If you can find the research and give to your husband, do you think he would read it and understand how serious this is?


Quoting brandyblx:

 When the doctor told us that a gluten allergy can cause a malabsorption of protein and even mess with the kid's attention span...just,wow.

Quoting Jynnifer292:

 Does your husband realize how damaging it would be to his health to continue eating something that is causing his body to eat away at his own intestines? Not only that, it causes neurological issues also. It doesn't mean that your DH can't eat whatever he wants when he is out or have things at home that ds can't eat, but ds should not eat gluten at all.





eema.gray
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 1:58 PM

Ah, I see.  Could the language thing be part of why he didn't exactly understand what the doctor said?  Maybe he and the doctor need a consult, so the dr can explain better, for him, what your son needs?  I'm sure your husband is perfectly capable of understanding English under his normal circumstances; medical language is pretty bewildering for many native English speakers, I can only imagine how much more difficult it would be for someone who did not grow up with English. 

Assuming you do the shopping, I would just shop with your son's food needs in mind and only discuss with your husband if he brings it up.


Quoting brandyblx:

 This is actually the one thing that is part of the problem.My hubby is Bolivan and he reads very little English.I have bee having a rough time finding anything written about Celiac in spanish.

Quoting eema.gray:

Long term, like decades of poor eating, can cause problems with memory and symptoms usually diagnosed as MS, Parkinson's, and other devestating neuro disorders.  If you can find the research and give to your husband, do you think he would read it and understand how serious this is?


Quoting brandyblx:

 When the doctor told us that a gluten allergy can cause a malabsorption of protein and even mess with the kid's attention span...just,wow.

Quoting Jynnifer292:

 Does your husband realize how damaging it would be to his health to continue eating something that is causing his body to eat away at his own intestines? Not only that, it causes neurological issues also. It doesn't mean that your DH can't eat whatever he wants when he is out or have things at home that ds can't eat, but ds should not eat gluten at all.







"I am only one, but I am still one; I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do." ~~ Edward Everett Hale 1822-1909
Mipsy
by Platinum Member on Feb. 14, 2013 at 6:54 PM

There is a TON of gluten free products out there now. And honestly, cooking from scratchn and fresh and shopping at wholefood stores (if possible), makes it much easier. Just about everyone on dh's side of the family has celiac's and is gluten free and once you get the hang of it, it's not that bad honestly. The biggest issue seems to be eating out, but so many places are now offering gluten free things on their menu's. 

inspain
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 7:02 PM

I have a friend whose son has Celiac.  They've gone totally gluten-free.  She was a dreadful cook before and now, gluten-free, her food is utterly inedible.  We've eaten over her place once since they made the switch, I just cannot do it again. 

Best of luck to you all.  And consider a good cookbook.

brandyblx
by Platinum Member on Feb. 14, 2013 at 7:12 PM
1 mom liked this

 I am actually a decent cook.I have already ordered 2 cookbooks that teach how to use the different types of flour...Don't worry,I won't starve my kids/hubby while I figure out how to cook gluten-free.

Quoting inspain:

I have a friend whose son has Celiac.  They've gone totally gluten-free.  She was a dreadful cook before and now, gluten-free, her food is utterly inedible.  We've eaten over her place once since they made the switch, I just cannot do it again. 

Best of luck to you all.  And consider a good cookbook.


eema.gray
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 7:22 PM
1 mom liked this

A good cookbook or two helps a lot when you're getting started.  After awhile, you'll be able to make substitutions to conventional recipes without having to think about it but at the beginning, it can be pretty overwhelming.  :-)


Quoting brandyblx:

 I am actually a decent cook.I have already ordered 2 cookbooks that teach how to use the different types of flour...Don't worry,I won't starve my kids/hubby while I figure out how to cook gluten-free.

Quoting inspain:

I have a friend whose son has Celiac.  They've gone totally gluten-free.  She was a dreadful cook before and now, gluten-free, her food is utterly inedible.  We've eaten over her place once since they made the switch, I just cannot do it again. 

Best of luck to you all.  And consider a good cookbook.




"I am only one, but I am still one; I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do." ~~ Edward Everett Hale 1822-1909
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