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Advice Needed About School in Michigan-Long-Diabetes Related

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I am going to try to make my story short.

My son will be 8 (tomorrow). He was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes about 2 months ago. He is handling it very well, and we have all adjusted much better than expected, but at school, there have been many problems. I live in a small town in southeast Michigan, and I just feel that there is no one at the school who is qualified to help him manage his insulin and blood sugars. They don't even have a school nurse (she got let go when they had budget cuts). They have 2 'parapros' who help kids, and they claim to have dealt with diabetic children before, but everything that they do says otherwise. I realize that it is an adjustment for everyone, but it has been 2 months, and they still can't count carbs, do the basic math required for his insulin dosing, treat his high and low sugars, or anything. They rush through everything and even lack the common sense to let him do his school work in the office when he is waiting for his blood sugar to go up when it's low. I have contacted everyone necessary, and talked to his teacher, the school counselor, the school social worker, his doctor, the parapros at school, the office staff, the principal...there is really no one else that I can go to, and nothing changes. We are supposed to test his blood sugar 4 times a day, or a couple extra times if he is feeling like his sugar is low so that we can treat it. They are testing it at school 10-15 times a day (just at school, between 9am and 340pm). I have talked to them about this several times, and they always seem to listen, seem to understand, and we come up with a plan, only for them to go right back to the way things were the next day. I went from calming talking to them, to very angrily and frustrated talking to them, to borderline yelling, to just crying because I am so frustrated and they just don't get it. I seriously feel like a group of monkeys could do better. It's like these people retain nothing. At this point, I just want to pull him out of the school. He is in the office more than he is in his class each day, and most of his school work gets sent home to be completed. I can't switch school districts, because I don't have a car to be able to drive him to another school, so I don't have many options. I asked the principal about just having him finish this year out from home, and possibly coming in to the school to take the required tests and whatnot. She didn't answer me. She kind of danced around it, and then told me that I need to make the decision that I feel is best for him. She said that of course she wants him at school, but it's not her decision. I had an hour long conversation with her about everything that's going on and all of these different options as far as doing his testing in class so that he doesn't miss so much, sending his work to the office, etc. I also talked about how often they test his sugar, saying that it's not necessary, and she agreed...then the next day, they used 10 test strips. It's just like it goes in one ear and out the other. I can't take it anymore. I have talked until I am blue in the face, written everything down so that they can reread anything that they forget, and they still do the same things, over and over.

So, my question is...I am in Michigan. Can I legally pull him out of school and have him do the work at home? Can anyone give me ANY pointers or at least some kind of direction since the principal wouldnt answer me?! I have already enrolled him in online school for next year, so I just need to get through these next 3 months, but I seriously fear for my son's health if he stays in the situation that he is in. (And yes, I have told the school staff and principal this).

Thank You in Advance to anyone that can help.

by on Mar. 7, 2013 at 10:38 PM
Replies (31-38):
Kris_PBG
by on Mar. 8, 2013 at 5:26 PM
We used the school plan to help create the 504 plan.

The 504 plan has not only medical information but also how the school is to manage the students medical needs on a day to day basis, early release days, in the event of a lock down, field trips, etc...

I am SHOCKED your school did not develop one. It seems unsafe for him and leaves the school open to problems without a plan. :(

Have you thought about asking for one? It is a legal document, which might give you more to "go on" if they fail to follow it...


Quoting KelseyLynn:

Quoting Kris_PBG:

I have a type 1 diabetes student in my class.



Everything we need to do for her was carefully laid out in her 504 plan.



We developed it as a team and it is our "road map" as to when to test, etc...



Does your son have a 504 plan in place?





He has a school health plan, which was designed by his doctor. But the school had the district nurse rewrite a school plan that they supposedly follow...although it seems to me that they don't follow either.

Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
gregheather
by Member on Mar. 8, 2013 at 5:49 PM
2 moms liked this

I wouldn't trust the school on his menu - I would send all of his food and snacks from home so that you know exactly what he is eating on a daily basis. He doesn't have issues at home - so that would lead me to believe that it something that he is eating at school that is causing his issues.

mamamiajk
by Ruby Member on Mar. 9, 2013 at 1:36 PM

I too live in MI but I"m afraid I am not qualified to answer. Is there  any way you could be with him in school hours? Maybe home schooled? I pray that things turn out ok

Jadegirl1819
by on Mar. 10, 2013 at 7:39 PM

I agree that you need to contact the ADA and get an advocate.  They will help you and may be able to send someone to go with you to the school during a meeting.

I have to say, though, that the excessive testing is due to your son saying he is feeling low.  You can't expect them to just blow him off because that would be a liability for them if he truly is low and has an emergency.  I don't understand the 10-15 times a day unless you are counting the rechecks after a low is treated. 

Is the endo telling you that you only need to check him a total of 4 times a day (school and home)?  Personally, I can't imagine only checking that many times and actually being able to keep his blood sugar in a good range.  The bare minimum we are checking 7 times a day and adding on for low rechecks, activity checks, etc. 

I wouldn't want my son doing class work when being treated for a low.

Also, I pack my sons lunch and put an itemized carb list for the food. 

Jadegirl1819
by on Mar. 10, 2013 at 7:46 PM

A lot of schools do whatever they can to avoid doing a 504 plan.  If the school doesn't follow the 504 they can get in trouble and lose government funding.  They just say they have an individual health plan and that is enough.  Our school tried to say that a 504 would only cover diabetes if there is learning difficulty which is untrue. 


Quoting Kris_PBG:

We used the school plan to help create the 504 plan.

The 504 plan has not only medical information but also how the school is to manage the students medical needs on a day to day basis, early release days, in the event of a lock down, field trips, etc...

I am SHOCKED your school did not develop one. It seems unsafe for him and leaves the school open to problems without a plan. :(

Have you thought about asking for one? It is a legal document, which might give you more to "go on" if they fail to follow it...


Quoting KelseyLynn:

Quoting Kris_PBG:

I have a type 1 diabetes student in my class.



Everything we need to do for her was carefully laid out in her 504 plan.



We developed it as a team and it is our "road map" as to when to test, etc...



Does your son have a 504 plan in place?





He has a school health plan, which was designed by his doctor. But the school had the district nurse rewrite a school plan that they supposedly follow...although it seems to me that they don't follow either.



PinkButterfly66
by Bronze Member on Mar. 10, 2013 at 8:05 PM

It looks like the teacher's certification requirement was struck down as unconstitutional. And you can get the bachelor's requirment waived with a religious exemption.

HOME SCHOOLING IN MICHIGAN 

The section of the Revised School Code that addresses Home Schools is 

contained in the Michigan Compiled Laws under MCL 380.1561. 

Right to Home School 

Michigan parents have the right to home school their children. The law 

requires a parent or legal guardian of a child from the age of six to sixteen 

to send his or her child to school during the entire school year, except 

under certain limited circumstances (MCL 380.1561). The exceptions 

include, but are not limited to, sending a child to a state-approved 

nonpublic school or educating a child at home in an organized educational 

program. 

Who May Home School 

Home school education is the responsibility of the parent or legal guardian. 

The parent assigns homework, gives tests and grades these tests. The 

issuance of report cards, transcripts, and diplomas are the responsibility of 

the home school family (based on internal standards). If home schooling 

continues through grade 12, the parent issues a high school diploma to the 

graduate. 

Reporting Process 

The annual registering of a home school to the Michigan Department of 

Education (MDE) is voluntary. It is not required unless the student has 

special needs and is requesting special education services from the local 

public school or intermediate school district. It is recommended that if 

special education services will be requested, the parent first submit a 

completed Nonpublic School Membership Report to MDE. This form is 

available on www.michigan.gov/homeschool. Before special education 

services are established, the school will contact MDE for verification that 

this process is complete. A list of registered home schools is provided to 

intermediate school district superintendents each December and March. 

It is not required that a parent inform their local school of the decision to 

home school, however, it is suggested. Failure to do so may result in the 

student being marked absent and the involvement of the truancy officer. 

Notification may be a phone call or a written note to the district. Keep in 

mind that a written note can be placed in the student’s school record 

indicating when the student has withdrawn from the school district. 

Teacher Requirement 

A parent or legal guardian that registers with MDE is qualified to teach 

their child if they have a teaching certificate or a bachelor’s degree. 

However, if they claim an objection to teacher certification based upon a 

sincerely held religious belief, the minimum education requirement of a 

teaching certificate or a bachelor’s degree is waived. 

Course of Study 

Instruction must include mathematics, reading, English, science, and social 

studies in all grades; and the Constitution of the United States, the 

Constitution of Michigan, and the history and present form of civil 

government of the United States, the State of Michigan, and the political 

subdivisions and municipalities of the State of Michigan in grades 10, 11, 

and 12. Michigan Department of Education 

http://www.michigan.gov/studentissues

2

Home school students may enroll in nonessential elective classes at the 

resident public school. 

Textbooks 

Home school families may purchase the textbooks and instructional 

material of their choice. School districts are not required to provide 

curriculum, textbooks, or materials to home school families. Textbooks 

and curriculum materials may be purchased from a teacher bookstore. 

Information regarding home school support services and materials can be 

found on the Internet. 

Student Records 

Parents are encouraged to maintain student records of progress 

throughout the year. These records will assist school personnel with 

placement should the student enroll in a public or nonpublic school. The 

granting of credits and placement of students is solely determined by the 

receiving school. If a student attends a home school and returns to a 

public school, the public school generally reevaluates the students for 

grade placement and the transfer of credit. 

Required Testing 

There are no required tests for a home school student. The parent is 

responsible for administering tests based upon the curriculum they use. 

Although not required, home school students may participate in the 

Michigan Educational Assessment Program (MEAP) and the Michigan Merit 

Examination (MME) at their local public school. These tests are managed 

by MDE and are administered at no cost to a home school student. For 

further information, please contact your local public school. 

Athletics 

The supervision and control of interscholastic athletics are the 

responsibility of each local board of education. Most local boards have 

adopted policies as proposed by the Michigan High School Athletic 

Association. Please contact the appropriate local school district or the 

Michigan High School Athletic Association at (517) 332-5046 or 

www.mhsaa.com. 

Work Permits 

Home school students may obtain a work permit through their local public 

school. 

Funding 

There are no public funds available for home schooling. 

Additional Information 

MDE’s website provides additional information on home schooling that 

includes legislation, the registration form, and instructions. You may 

access this information at www.michigan.gov/homeschool. For additional 

information on home schooling, please contact Tami Feldpausch at 

(517) 373-1833 or email Nonpublicschools@michigan.gov. 


http://www.michigan.gov/documents/MDE-P2_attachb1_13526_7.pdf

http://www.michigan.gov/mde/0,4615,7-140-6530_6569_35175---,00.html

Kris_PBG
by on Mar. 10, 2013 at 8:05 PM
Wow- yes - very untrue!!!!!

Our school offered and made the 504 plan seem like an automatic, regular course of action.


Quoting Jadegirl1819:

A lot of schools do whatever they can to avoid doing a 504 plan.  If the school doesn't follow the 504 they can get in trouble and lose government funding.  They just say they have an individual health plan and that is enough.  Our school tried to say that a 504 would only cover diabetes if there is learning difficulty which is untrue. 



Quoting Kris_PBG:

We used the school plan to help create the 504 plan.



The 504 plan has not only medical information but also how the school is to manage the students medical needs on a day to day basis, early release days, in the event of a lock down, field trips, etc...



I am SHOCKED your school did not develop one. It seems unsafe for him and leaves the school open to problems without a plan. :(



Have you thought about asking for one? It is a legal document, which might give you more to "go on" if they fail to follow it...





Quoting KelseyLynn:

Quoting Kris_PBG:

I have a type 1 diabetes student in my class.





Everything we need to do for her was carefully laid out in her 504 plan.





We developed it as a team and it is our "road map" as to when to test, etc...





Does your son have a 504 plan in place?







He has a school health plan, which was designed by his doctor. But the school had the district nurse rewrite a school plan that they supposedly follow...although it seems to me that they don't follow either.






Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Beachscreamer
by on May. 1, 2013 at 9:53 PM
1 mom liked this

I'd be more than happy to talk to you about this and hope to help. My daughter is 10 years old and was diagnosed with type 1 at the age if 18 mos old. At the age of 2 she started testing her own BG (with me watching over her, of course) Before she was 2, she was getting 10 insulin injections a day.. Lantus 2x a day and Novolog the other times; for bolus and correction. 

When my daughter was a 26 months old, she was put onto an insulin pump, which made "the math" so much easier : as it calculates it all re: insulin to carb ratio and corrections when "high." Of course the pump is all set up, based on my daughters daily schedule and target range. 

We have moved 13 times in her ten years of life (and am done with moving...since the divorce) She has attended many different schools and in 4 different states. 

We have attended schools that did not have a nurse on board and staff members that said they would quit, if my daughter attended the school. I also had teachers ask if she has to wear that "bag" around her waist (which was a pump bag to carry her insulin pump in, strapped around her waist). 

The way I handled the "no nurse available" situation is: I demanded a staff meeting with all my daughter saw daily...  Teachers; gym, library, music, aides, principal etc.

I typed up guidelines, phone numbers : mine, doctors, emergency etc. and gave it to all... I discussed in the meeting my concerns, my expectations and answered all questions. 

I included symptoms of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia and how to treat the situation. Most importantly to always call mom. I am always and have always been available, if needed at the school. I sent my daughter to school everyday with her "kit" her little back pack.. It consists of a glucagon, juice box, test strips, meter, ID card, snacks, & water.  She always brings it to school and back home daily.

she would and still does, tests herself, every 2 hours for the last 8 years and I do so during the night when she is asleep.. We have to, as her BG's are still all over the place.. (Maybe they say because she also has celiac disease) 

At school, she tests and she calls, me...   Even though now, after 8+ years of having diabetes, we still want to "make sure" she is going to do the right thing... Afterall, she is only 10 and still a child...   

So, at school she tests her BG, calls me... She tells me what she is ... If she's low she drinks her juice and re-tests in 30 mins and calls me back... If she's high she tells me what she is and puts it in her pump and tells me what the pump says to administer.... (Sometimes I override it and give her more or less.. But that's based on my own personal experience/ situation, with my daughter).

Lunchtime: I pack my daughters own lunch. I include a sticky note with everything in her lunch box..including her carbs..  ie: water- 0 carbs  rolled sliced chicken- 0carbs Yogurt - 20 carbs, small apple- 15 carbs.   She tests before lunch and calls me with her BG and after she eats she calls me and tells me what she ate... (Sometimes she doesn't eat everything, as why I have her give herself insulin, after she eats based on the carbs.. She'll tell me ie: I only ate the apple and chicken.. And I will tell her just cover herself for that apple of 15 carbs... 

I do get 9-10 calls a day at times, even now that she does have a school nurse but "we" want to make sure she is doing the right thing and I'm prepping her for middle school (6th grade) next year, so she can do this all on her own... 

If you'd like to ask any questions or would like further suggestions or help, please feel free to inbox me. 

:)


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