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my 6 yr old iq was 108...is that good?

Posted by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 7:52 AM
  • 16 Replies
Took my son for an eeg and phsycometric testing a month ago and they did an iq test it was 108. He just turned 6 in november.
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by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 7:52 AM
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Replies (1-10):
supermom0609
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 7:55 AM
Bump
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kcihldy
by New Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 7:59 AM
100 is average so 108 is fairly average. It's not bad.
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lovinmama411
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 8:00 AM

The tests are structured so that 100 is average, so he is a little above average.

megz0511
by Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 8:02 AM
I think they consider 120 gifted.
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imultracool
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 8:03 AM
Above average. That's what my dd7 tested at.
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coolmommy2x
by Ruby Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 8:05 AM
I'm surprised they didn't review the score with you. What is the outcome of these tests?
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lancet98
by Bronze Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 8:18 AM

IQ tests compare the abilities of your child to an average.  

IQ tests are an attempt to measure how well a child learns information and can put concepts and ideas into practice.   The tests are 'age appropriate' so to some extent they are an indication of how well the child is learning with his current education plan.

Without actually intending to, IQ tests may also measure other things - test anxiety, inability to concentrate, language problems.   IQ tests can be helpful as long as they are interpreted appropriately and are just a part of an overall evaluation. 

As an example, if my child did poorly on an IQ test, I would want to investigate what the reason could have been.   Perhaps a young child does poorly on a verbal IQ test because he has a hearing impairment, or a child who's older does poorly on a written IQ test because he is distracted, needs glasses, or is very anxious.

IQ tests have their limitations.  

 For example, a very old study of children in crowded orphanages, showed that the children's test scores could be raised by 20 or 30 points, by giving the children more individual help and attention.    They looked 'below average' on the first test, but after lots of attention and coaching, their scores went up quite a bit.

In the 'old days', some tried to use IQ tests to plop kids into strict categories of mental retardation, normalcy or giftedness.   It's actually better if an IQ test is just a part of overall measurements.   Imagine how useless it would be to classify a child as 'mentally retarded' when he really just needs glasses!  

As for IQ tests 'not meaning much' (the relative with the IQ of 170 and mental illness and alcoholism), yes...and no.

Intelligence has no 'protective effect' against mental disorders or addictive disorders.   There isn't any linke between the two.   Persons who are developmentally delayed can have mental illness as well, or addictions.  

 It's just that when a person is intelligent, many people think it's ironic, because they believe intelligence should 'protect' a person against mental illness - as if a person could 'think' their way out of a mental illness!   Or an addiction!

The truth is that mental illnesses are medical diseases of the brain, and not something a person can 'reason' his way out of or 'think' his way out of.  In fact, when an intelligent person becomes mentally ill, that intelligence is often put to work formulating very intelligent sounding reasons why they don't need help!

It is indeed ironic to see an 'intelligent' person have serious problems, but in the case of mental illness and addiction, it just is not possible to use superior logic and reasoning to 'think one's way out'.  

Cymbeline
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 8:34 AM
It is a perfectly normal score. He will do well as long as he remains motivated. The same is true of any child.

Also, try to ignore anyone who lists a high IQ for their child or themselves. It happens as part of the CM exaggeration trend and has no place in this thread.

I would ask them to review the score with you.
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supermom0609
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:15 AM
Adhd,impulse control disorder and aspergers


Quoting coolmommy2x:

I'm surprised they didn't review the score with you. What is the outcome of these tests?

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coolmommy2x
by Ruby Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 10:50 AM
Now you have answers. Have you figured out a course of treatment?

Quoting supermom0609:

Adhd,impulse control disorder and aspergers




Quoting coolmommy2x:

I'm surprised they didn't review the score with you. What is the outcome of these tests?

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