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Do you think she should get to take her "Homeschooled" boyfriend to her prom?

Posted by on Apr. 18, 2013 at 1:44 PM
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1 mom liked this
UHS family members question prom lockout

CASEY S. ELLIOTT
Staff Writer


Family members of an Urbana High School student asked Urbana City Schools’ board members to reverse an administrative decision to bar her boyfriend from the upcoming prom.

The request came during the public comment period at the school board meeting Tuesday.

Tami Tobias told the board her daughter, a junior, was hoping to attend prom with her 18-year-old boyfriend, a home school graduate. Tobias said administrators told her that individuals who do not attend the high school must get permission to attend the prom, and there are rules as to who can attend. Those who can’t include individuals over age 20 and school dropouts.

Tobias said administrators determined her daughter’s boyfriend to be a “dropout” and are barring him from the prom because the company that awarded him his diploma, Cornerstone Christian Correspondence School in Townsend, Ga., is not accredited with state or federal departments of education.

“She’s denied the right to bring her boyfriend, unlike the other students enrolled at Urbana High School,” Tobias said. “How is that fair?”

Tobias added the boyfriend received the diploma last year, has a full-time job, worked at Honda and was accepted at ITT Technical Institute. She said she does not believe the administration’s decision on this issue is fair, calling it discriminatory.

“This document says high school diploma, with his full name and date,” she said. “If this is not accepted and he’s still considered a dropout, that to me is discrimination.”

Superintendent Charles Thiel said the reason the administration considers him a “dropout” is because it does not consider Cornerstone Christian’s diploma valid. Thiel said that organization’s accreditation is through a private company that is not recognized by the U.S. Department of Education or the state of Ohio. The “diploma” document is more like a certificate of completion of the school’s tests and is often not recognized by a number of employers, the military or colleges as a valid diploma, he said. Often, individuals who receive that document must take additional testing or seek a GED before any of those organizations accept them, he said.

Other audience members questioned the term “dropout” for the situation, stating the student got an education as a home schooled student through this organization.

Administrators said though the term “dropout” is unfortunate, it is the term the state uses to label a number of situations at school, whether the student dies while attending the school or drops out of high school to do other things.

“It’s an inaccurate term,” said board member Jim Arter, adding students who move from the district to another, then move back, then move out again, are marked as dropouts — twice.

“It’s the box we are forced to mark. It’s bizarre,” he said.

Thiel said there are other misconceptions about what “home school” is. For many, it is the idea that a student decides to receive schooling at home instead of in a formal classroom. He said there are home school associations or organizations that provide curriculum, and there are private companies that provide schooling, with the family buying the program and the student learning at home.

The Urbana school board-sponsored Urbana Community School is a program in which students receive credit while learning at home. The program is accredited through the Ohio Department of Education, and a diploma from that is equivalent to an Urbana High School diploma, but the student never attends class in a building.

“For some people in the community, that’s considered home school,” he said.

Tobias asked board members to overrule the administration’s decision so her daughter could go to prom with her boyfriend.

The board could reverse the administration’s decision, but Thiel cautioned the board on making that move. He said boards tend to set broad policy relating to school operations, and administrators refine those policies into more specific guidelines for the district and individual buildings.

“We don’t expect the board to make decisions in regards to, say, young ladies’ spaghetti straps on their tops” he said. “The board policy talks about dress and appearance and gives a broad overview of what the expectations of the board are. The regulations and guidelines go deeper into the details.”

Thiel added there are times when board intervention is appropriate, but the board needs to consider when to do that and the precedent it could set.

Board members expressed sympathy for the situation and plan to schedule a committee meeting to discuss board policy relating to the issue.

The committee makes recommendations for changes to the full board. The date of that meeting has not been set.

The board would have to call a special meeting if it were to vote to reverse the administration’s decision, and that may not occur before the May 4 prom.

 

by on Apr. 18, 2013 at 1:44 PM
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Replies (1-10):
momcat437
by Platinum Member on Apr. 18, 2013 at 1:51 PM
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 When a student is homeschooled, he or she is still part of the school district he or she resides in--a parent is given an excuse from compulsory attendance but is still enrolled in the district.  Even if the boyfriend has graduated, he was part of his school district, and in no way should be considered a "drop-out", or have his diploma considered worthless...

sha_lyn68
by Bronze Member on Apr. 18, 2013 at 11:19 PM
5 moms liked this


Quoting momcat437:

 When a student is homeschooled, he or she is still part of the school district he or she resides in--a parent is given an excuse from compulsory attendance but is still enrolled in the district.  Even if the boyfriend has graduated, he was part of his school district, and in no way should be considered a "drop-out", or have his diploma considered worthless...

No homeschoolers are typically not considered enrolled in the distict. It is just like attending private school. 


As for the OP, yes he should be able to attend the prom. He was legally homeschooled therefore he is not a drop-out.

TableforSeven
by Judy on Apr. 18, 2013 at 11:59 PM
1 mom liked this

Yes, he should be allowed to attend the prom with her.  

When I was a senior, our high school required that you informed them who you were bringing to the prom...even if they we also seniors in our school.  LONG story short - I had three different dates for the prom at various times - one was in college, one lived out of state, one was from my school.  They never asked me for anything but their names and if they were in high school, a graduate, or in college.  They didnt have an age rule like that...if they had, my college-date would have been barred.

TEIMSfamily
by Member on Apr. 19, 2013 at 12:04 AM
1 mom liked this

Does that mean that people with GEDs are all drop outs?

ButtonsMama44
by on Apr. 19, 2013 at 12:12 AM
1 mom liked this
Yes he should be allowed to go
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zoo003
by Bronze Member on Apr. 19, 2013 at 12:20 AM
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Really?  I am not being snarky, I am truly curious.  When I asked if my dd, who goes to a charter school, could try out for the high school soccer team, I was told that they treat charter school students like they do home schooled kids.  Due to the fact that they consider both to be part of the district, then yes, she could try out.  Like I said, I am in no way, shape, or form an expert on homeschooling, but I am curious.   

*Edit-OP, I do believe he should be allowed to attend the prom. 

Quoting sha_lyn68:


Quoting momcat437:

 When a student is homeschooled, he or she is still part of the school district he or she resides in--a parent is given an excuse from compulsory attendance but is still enrolled in the district.  Even if the boyfriend has graduated, he was part of his school district, and in no way should be considered a "drop-out", or have his diploma considered worthless...

No homeschoolers are typically not considered enrolled in the distict. It is just like attending private school. 

 

As for the OP, yes he should be able to attend the prom. He was legally homeschooled therefore he is not a drop-out.

 

Rachael-Dawn
by Bronze Member on Apr. 19, 2013 at 12:26 AM
Yes, she should be allowed to bring him. Even if he were not part of the district and all of the above ousted requirements. As long as the prom is properly chaperoned and she has permission from her parents I feel like it should be ok.
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yanamom
by on Apr. 19, 2013 at 12:33 AM
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He's been accepted to a technical school. They do not take people who do not have a high school diploma or a GED. They accepted his high school diploma as valid. So what is the problem? I am guessing that the local high school administration tries to discourage any parent who wants to give their child a better education than the local public school. This is just one more way to put pressure on those families who don't want to be part of the public school indoctrination program.

I am glad I didn't have to worry about that type of crap. I didn't have to tell anyone, other than my parents who was taking me to the prom.

afwifeandmommy3
by on Apr. 19, 2013 at 12:35 AM
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If the school wasn't recognized like they are claiming ITT tech wouldn't accept him
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frndlyfn
by Emerald Member on Apr. 19, 2013 at 12:37 AM
1 mom liked this

Yeah our school district has departments for the homeschoolers and the virtual academy option as well for part of the school district.

To my knowledge our prom had no such restrictions since i took a 26 yr old friend as a date to mine.

As long as the date complies with all rules of the school during prom, there should be no issue of whom goes.


Quoting zoo003:

Really?  I am not being snarky, I am truly curious.  When I asked if my dd, who goes to a charter school, could try out for the high school soccer team, I was told that they treat charter school students like they do home schooled kids.  Due to the fact that they consider both to be part of the district, then yes, she could try out.  Like I said, I am in no way, shape, or form an expert on homeschooling, but I am curious.   

*Edit-OP, I do believe he should be allowed to attend the prom. 

Quoting sha_lyn68:


Quoting momcat437:

 When a student is homeschooled, he or she is still part of the school district he or she resides in--a parent is given an excuse from compulsory attendance but is still enrolled in the district.  Even if the boyfriend has graduated, he was part of his school district, and in no way should be considered a "drop-out", or have his diploma considered worthless...

No homeschoolers are typically not considered enrolled in the distict. It is just like attending private school. 


As for the OP, yes he should be able to attend the prom. He was legally homeschooled therefore he is not a drop-out.

 



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