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Why are so many people against this?

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My family is planning on donating grandpas house to a local homeless shelter. He passed away earlier this year. The shelter would then allow 1-2 families at a time (depending on size of family) to live there for a max of 60 days so they can get on their feet. One of the requirement of this home is going to be the child attends the local school (it is a way so the kids don't have to transfer schools while their families are going through this difficult time). Well the problem we are running into is the neighbors objecting to the plan and there is going to be a city counsel meeting about it. The home will be maintained by the shelter and no one with felony or violent crime backgrounds will be allowed to stay there (more city requirements). This is not a really rich neighborhood but not poor either. Houses range from 150,000-250,000, which is lower income for this school district. I just want to know if you would be against something like this in your neighborhood? If the city does decline it we will be selling the house and donating the money
by on Jun. 11, 2013 at 5:17 PM
Replies (31-40):
Arwyn724
by on Jun. 12, 2013 at 7:36 AM

It would not work in my neighborhood.  My small community is all single-family homes, with a very strict HOA.  Regardless of how big your home is, no more than one family may live there, and the restrictions on home-businesses are very rigid, too.  You can work from home, but only office type stuff, no day-cares or selling things that may bring traffic into the community. As mentioned by pp's, this is all to insure property values stay consistent.

Arwyn 724 

lancet98
by Member on Jun. 12, 2013 at 7:41 AM

Just to be realistic, it is usually only possible to establish homeless shelters in very poor neighborhoods.  Otherwise neighbors pitch a fit.   Even in the poorer neighborhoods it can be a problem.  

No, I'm not suggesting this is good, I'm just saying it is common.

A suggestion, though - expect resistance, and keep at it in a very polite but persistent way.   You may have to add more restrictions or conditions to who stays there.   When you get resistance, ask what changes would make the shelter acceptable, rather than expressing feelings of frustration or disappointment.

Normally, the more restrictive the criteria, the fewer families or individuals qualify, but since this shelter is only planned to have a few families it should be constantly filled.

mysticatgal
by Member on Jun. 12, 2013 at 8:00 AM
I can see being afraid of who might go but maybe people don't realize the regulations. It could be they are worried about it getting trashed if noone takes the pride of ownership. Hopefully the meetings will clear up concerns. It is great your family will do this.
KellyNips
by Member on Jun. 12, 2013 at 10:12 AM

i think your family is awesome -- i wish there were more people like you guys.  here's hoping that the city council votes to allow the house to be used for a homeless shelter.  please keep us posted.

RADmomma
by on Jun. 12, 2013 at 10:17 AM
I think that's a wonderful idea. But 60 days doesn't seem like a very long time to get back on your feet...
Tipsen
by Bronze Member on Jun. 12, 2013 at 10:29 AM


Our family didn't set the time, the shelter did. They said under few circumstances they will extend for an additional 60 

Quoting RADmomma:

I think that's a wonderful idea. But 60 days doesn't seem like a very long time to get back on your feet...



RADmomma
by on Jun. 12, 2013 at 10:31 AM
I understand that they set the rules. I was just saying that going from homeless to getting a job, saving $ & getting their own place is going to take more than 60 days. Are they providing any classes to teach job skills?

Quoting Tipsen:


Our family didn't set the time, the shelter did. They said under few circumstances they will extend for an additional 60 


Quoting RADmomma:

I think that's a wonderful idea. But 60 days doesn't seem like a very long time to get back on your feet...




TheMetal
by on Jun. 12, 2013 at 11:05 AM

I would not be against it, however, it would likely bring down property values.

You also have the added risk of criminals or felons living there who have not registered with the organization that is running the household. Although many people who will be using the program will seem innocent, it is commonplace for people who are homeless to attract people who do not have a good rapport, no matter how good their intentions may be.

There is the lack of familiarity between neighbors which often causes problems when you have such a high tenant turn over rate. It's unsettling to many people not to know who lives near them.

In addition, not having a criminal record doesn't always mean the person is not a criminal and does not affiliate with criminals, rather, it just means that they have not been caught.

Being someone who has worked with the homeless before, I will say that these neighbors have good reason to worry for the safety and integrity of their neighborhood with a homeless shelter opening right next door.

SteffM0501
by on Jun. 12, 2013 at 11:08 AM

My whole neighborhood is practically section 8 housing, so this wouldn't really bother me.

Fairegirl33
by on Jun. 12, 2013 at 3:20 PM

 if the shelter does indeed hold tight to those criteria, I would have no problem.

 wow $150-$200K homes is low income in that area ?

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