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All because some mom's won't vaccinate...

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Do you agree that this is the reason that the measles are back or do you think there is more to it?

From Prince Edward Island to British Columbia, doctors across Canada are grappling with a highly infectious disease the likes of which they’ve never seen before: measles.

Measles was supposedly stamped out years ago, along with whooping cough, polio and other nasty maladies. But now it’s made a comeback, thanks to people who don’t believe in vaccinations. France, northern England and Wales have all been hit with serious measles outbreaks. Wales alone has had 1,200 cases since November of last year, mostly among children and adolescents under 18. Dozens more cases have appeared in pockets of the United States.

Canada has recorded about 30 cases in 2013, including eight in B.C. since June. “It’s been three years since we have seen measles in B.C.,” Dr. Paul Martiquet of the Vancouver Coastal Health Authority told Canadian Press.

The modern anti-vaccination scare began in the late 1990s, when a British physician named Andrew Wakefield began warning people that the MMR vaccine (measles, mumps and rubella) causes autism in children. Medical experts refuted his claims, but parents panicked. Vaccination rates in Britain sank from 92 per cent to 73 per cent. Dr. Wakefield’s research has since been widely condemned as a giant fraud, and many of the current crop of measles victims were never vaccinated because of him.

In Canada, the good news is that the new infections have been imported from elsewhere, either from infected people who travelled to Canada and passed it along, or from Canadians who were infected abroad. The bad news is that Canada’s vaccination rate is just 85 per cent – lower than it should be to confer population immunity. Our worst recent outbreak occurred in 2011, when 725 people came down with it in Quebec.

Even though Dr. Wakefield was thoroughly disgraced, anti-vaxxers aren’t hard to find. Plenty of chiropractors, homeopaths and other practitioners of “natural” medicine believe vaccines are unnecessary or dangerous. Activist-actress Jenny McCarthy (the new girl on The View) has been waging a high-profile war on childhood vaccines for years. Robert F. Kennedy Jr., the environmental activist, is another anti-vax crackpot. He’s claimed that we’re poisoning our children with thimerosal, a preservative in vaccines, and that a vast conspiracy of government agencies has covered up the truth.

Some anti-vaxxers belong to fringe religious groups. But some are highly educated, hyper-vigilant, holistically minded parents who believe the environment is full of toxic substances that are potential threats to their children. Some think the medical establishment has no right to tell them what to do.

“Measles is not a life-threatening disease,” goes one typical online comment. “Parents have every right not to vaccinate their children, especially when big pharma still uses toxins such as mercury (still in flu shots) and aluminum (still in most infant/child vaccines).” These people get plenty of affirmation on the Internet, which is a bottomless cornucopia of junk science and scare stories.

It’s true that measles rarely kills. But it can have serious side effects, including deafness and pneumonia. It travels the globe at the speed of airplanes. It is also easy to prevent and totally unnecessary. In some countries, and also some Canadian provinces, you have to get your kids vaccinated or else they can’t go to school. Good idea. As we learned with seat belts, a little coercion can be a good thing.


http://www.theglobeandmail.com/commentary/measles-is-back-it-had-help/article13359533/

by on Jul. 25, 2013 at 7:33 PM
Replies (41-50):
mamav2215
by on Jul. 26, 2013 at 3:35 PM
2 moms liked this

Let us not forget that over seas travel and travel to third world countries has grown exponentially in the last 2 decades. People use to "stay put" much more. While I do think vaccines are important. I can completely understand why some parents choose not to vaccinate against certain things. I myself will not be getting the whooping cough vaccine while pregnant, against dr. orders because long term effects on a fetus are not even possible to identify at this point. However, she'll be getting her vaccines... on an alternative schedule (no 6 shots in one appointment for us). And I don't think its necessary to vaccinate against EVERYTHING.  Chicken pox... yes they suck. big time. I don't want to watch my baby struggle through them. But getting sick with non deadly things helps your immune system! 

As for austism... I don't know. There's more than just one mans research pointing to vaccines as the culprit. Although; I'd honestly rather have an autistic kid than a dead one. 

themissheather
by on Jul. 26, 2013 at 3:35 PM
In the 80's the federal government changed the law so that doctors and pharmaceutical companies can no longer be sued if a child has an adverse reaction. They set up a fund to compensate families of injured children.

Quoting LittleBirdFly:


to shut them up? I dont know but I heard you can not sue the doctor nor the vaccine company


Quoting mustbeGRACE:

THERE IS A FUND SET ASIDE BY THE GOVERNMENT FOR THOSE INJURED BY VACCINES  !!!!!

GUESS WHAT IT'S FOR  ?????





nancyschmancey
by Member on Jul. 26, 2013 at 4:06 PM
2 moms liked this


Quoting grapesandwrath:

Or....its because our own, natural immune systems are destroyed because of today's vax schedule and the disinfecting era.

Our kids need to be exposed to illness. Or pretty soon we will all end up in a bubble.

I agree with you philosophically - we're far too sheltered in general... not just over-eradicating all germs, but preventing a lot of previously thought of "normal" behavior because we're becoming overprotective.  These days, you're a bad parent if you haven't eliminated all risk in your child's life, and I think that's sad.

That being said, each parent has to be allowed to do their best for their kid, and their specific risk assessment is what matters.  So yes, I'm going to vaccinate my kid for many things (not chicken pox), but I'm not going to follow them around with antibacterial gel.  I know some of you will disagree with each part of that plan, and that's okay.  I'm going to do what I think is right for my kid, and I respect other parents for doing the same, even if I think they've decided wrong.

I really appreciate the OP for this thread.  Good to talk with others about this, especially for newbies like me.

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nancyschmancey
by Member on Jul. 26, 2013 at 4:07 PM
2 moms liked this


Quoting mamav2215:

And I don't think its necessary to vaccinate against EVERYTHING.  Chicken pox... yes they suck. big time. I don't want to watch my baby struggle through them. But getting sick with non deadly things helps your immune system! 

As for austism... I don't know. There's more than just one mans research pointing to vaccines as the culprit. Although; I'd honestly rather have an autistic kid than a dead one. 

Well said, mamav!

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mamav2215
by on Jul. 26, 2013 at 5:02 PM
1 mom liked this

I can't think of anything more compelling to not do something... if you have religious beliefs. I don't think those religious beliefs should be imposed on others. But if someone truly believes it against their religious belief system to vaccinate... then aren't they a hypocrite if they do?  

People put way too much faith in the medical community... a VERY sketchy system these days. Are you aware that the reason they pulled oral polio vaccines are because people were actually giving the disease to their peers who hadn't obtained immunity yet? They excreted the live disease through their feces, snot, breathing and gave people polio.  I'm by no means saying don't vaccinate. but unless you've walked on both sides of the line... don't judge. 


Quoting Cmgmqmmom:

Until kids start (God forbid) dying and getting irreparably injured from infectious diseases these families will continue to use b.s reasons to not vaccinate their kids. If your kid is medically incapable of getting a vaccine, that's understandable. If you aren't doing it because you disagree with it philosophically or religiously, I don't agree. Citing the use of aborted fetal stem cells 50 years ago to generate the vaccine as the reason why you won't do it is garbage.

What I find ironic is that all these anti-vax nuts are relying on their child not getting ill because of herd immunity. Kids are not getting sick because fortunately, there are still more people getting vaccines than not. If this movement keeps up, there will be fewer kids getting vaccinated and more kids getting sick. But the anti-vax nuts will tell you that it's all a lie, a conspiracy or biased because they found some crack pot on the internet to tell them so.





mamav2215
by on Jul. 26, 2013 at 5:09 PM

COULDN't AGREE MORE! My god, chicken pox suck. I had them as a baby so I don't remember, but I remember my nephew as a baby.. it was sad. Did it hurt him? NO. Does he have a little more of a strong immune system because of them... I believe so. I'd also like to point out... my nephew got them from his sister who was vaccinated. She didn't get them as severely as he did, we were convinced she had an allergy until he got them. 

Also... I had shingles when I was 9 (EXTREMELY RARE). They sucked, not gonna lie... I had it in my eye and I could have gone blind had they continued to spread. But that's extremely rare, and I saw a doctor who gave me drops to protect my eye membranes and I was glad to miss a few days of school.  I never saw Shingles Vaccines being handed out at pharmacies until the last year or two. Weird.... that first generation of vaccinated chicken pox kids are becoming adults... I wonder why the boost in shingles? 


Quoting tyrelsmom:

Oh, this so much. Since when did chicken pox morph into some deadly disease? I too remember when the vaccine came out and they ADMITTED the main point of the vaccine was so kids wouldn't miss school and parents wouldn't miss work. Now it's "you're gonna kill the whole neighborhood if you don't vaccinate". Meanwhile shingles cases have gone through the roof since the vaccine has started....


Quoting GaleJ:

I must say that I have some questions and concerns when it comes to vaccinations.

When our son was young we selectively vaccinated. I honestly can't remember which was which now but on the advice of our doctor we gave him two of the MMR vaccines separately and didn't do the third one. There were, at the time, some concerns about that one part and due to the medical histories of our families our doctor thought that the risk outweighed the benefits for that segment for our son. Since we trusted our doctor and had read of the same concerns we felt it was justified.

The other issue I have vaccinations stems from our experience with the vaccine for the chicken pox. It was just being introduced when our son was young. Like many vaccines and medicines it was touted by the company that produced it in a pamphlet in which the company itself said that the chicken pox really wasn't dangerous and that the reason they had researched and introduced the vaccine was financial. Since there were so many families in which both parents worked and since the normal course of the chicken pox was approximately two weeks the vaccine would insure that the parents would not be in the position of having to miss so much work. We declined the vaccine since that wasn't an issue for us, I was a SAHP, and in due course our son got the chicken pox, no problem.

Since that time twenty some years the intention of the vaccine has morphed into one of medical importance although the chicken pox have not changed and aren't that dangerous and the risk of complications very low. They also administer it several times over the course of childhood and adolescence and now advocate for the adult version to fight off shingles although its efficacy against shingles has really not been proven. So my thought is that you sell more vaccine and make more money if it's about "dire health concerns" rather than whether or not working parents must miss work when their child/children have the chicken pox.

So I am all for vaccinations when appropriate for individual children for diseases that are proven to be dangerous or deadly or for children with compromised immunity. On the other hand for common childhood diseases that are generally not threats to the healthy children or others in the community I believe that parents should make the choice. If children who are not vaccinated do get such diseases they will then have the same immunity as provided by the vaccine and the disease itself should not be of consequence to the larger community since even though vaccination rates have fallen most children still are vaccinated. 




mamav2215
by on Jul. 26, 2013 at 5:15 PM

Getting chickpox gives you the virus that causes shingles. It's inside your body dormant, some of that population it comes out in and some it never does. I had shingles in 2nd or 3rd grade. Chicken pox as a baby. There is strong belief that the vaccine is actually making shingles more prevelant. So your kid got it because she was an unlucky one to have the virus come out, and the other kids probably got it due to the vaccine, as the dept. of minn told you.  I'm curious... what year was this? I'm from MN. 


Quoting NDADanceMom:

My only child that was not vaxed for chicken pox (because she got it before getting the shot) was diagnosed with shingles last year in 5th grade. The Minnesota department of health called us about it because there was an outbreak that somehow was linked to the vax. Not sure of how though since she never had the shot.

Quoting tyrelsmom:

Oh, this so much. Since when did chicken pox morph into some deadly disease? I too remember when the vaccine came out and they ADMITTED the main point of the vaccine was so kids wouldn't miss school and parents wouldn't miss work. Now it's "you're gonna kill the whole neighborhood if you don't vaccinate". Meanwhile shingles cases have gone through the roof since the vaccine has started....




Quoting GaleJ:

I must say that I have some questions and concerns when it comes to vaccinations.

When our son was young we selectively vaccinated. I honestly can't remember which was which now but on the advice of our doctor we gave him two of the MMR vaccines separately and didn't do the third one. There were, at the time, some concerns about that one part and due to the medical histories of our families our doctor thought that the risk outweighed the benefits for that segment for our son. Since we trusted our doctor and had read of the same concerns we felt it was justified.

The other issue I have vaccinations stems from our experience with the vaccine for the chicken pox. It was just being introduced when our son was young. Like many vaccines and medicines it was touted by the company that produced it in a pamphlet in which the company itself said that the chicken pox really wasn't dangerous and that the reason they had researched and introduced the vaccine was financial. Since there were so many families in which both parents worked and since the normal course of the chicken pox was approximately two weeks the vaccine would insure that the parents would not be in the position of having to miss so much work. We declined the vaccine since that wasn't an issue for us, I was a SAHP, and in due course our son got the chicken pox, no problem.

Since that time twenty some years the intention of the vaccine has morphed into one of medical importance although the chicken pox have not changed and aren't that dangerous and the risk of complications very low. They also administer it several times over the course of childhood and adolescence and now advocate for the adult version to fight off shingles although its efficacy against shingles has really not been proven. So my thought is that you sell more vaccine and make more money if it's about "dire health concerns" rather than whether or not working parents must miss work when their child/children have the chicken pox.

So I am all for vaccinations when appropriate for individual children for diseases that are proven to be dangerous or deadly or for children with compromised immunity. On the other hand for common childhood diseases that are generally not threats to the healthy children or others in the community I believe that parents should make the choice. If children who are not vaccinated do get such diseases they will then have the same immunity as provided by the vaccine and the disease itself should not be of consequence to the larger community since even though vaccination rates have fallen most children still are vaccinated. 




NDADanceMom
by on Jul. 26, 2013 at 5:16 PM
Last year

Quoting mamav2215:

Getting chickpox gives you the virus that causes shingles. It's inside your body dormant, some of that population it comes out in and some it never does. I had shingles in 2nd or 3rd grade. Chicken pox as a baby. There is strong belief that the vaccine is actually making shingles more prevelant. So your kid got it because she was an unlucky one to have the virus come out, and the other kids probably got it due to the vaccine, as the dept. of minn told you.  I'm curious... what year was this? I'm from MN. 



Quoting NDADanceMom:

My only child that was not vaxed for chicken pox (because she got it before getting the shot) was diagnosed with shingles last year in 5th grade. The Minnesota department of health called us about it because there was an outbreak that somehow was linked to the vax. Not sure of how though since she never had the shot.



Quoting tyrelsmom:

Oh, this so much. Since when did chicken pox morph into some deadly disease? I too remember when the vaccine came out and they ADMITTED the main point of the vaccine was so kids wouldn't miss school and parents wouldn't miss work. Now it's "you're gonna kill the whole neighborhood if you don't vaccinate". Meanwhile shingles cases have gone through the roof since the vaccine has started....







Quoting GaleJ:

I must say that I have some questions and concerns when it comes to vaccinations.

When our son was young we selectively vaccinated. I honestly can't remember which was which now but on the advice of our doctor we gave him two of the MMR vaccines separately and didn't do the third one. There were, at the time, some concerns about that one part and due to the medical histories of our families our doctor thought that the risk outweighed the benefits for that segment for our son. Since we trusted our doctor and had read of the same concerns we felt it was justified.

The other issue I have vaccinations stems from our experience with the vaccine for the chicken pox. It was just being introduced when our son was young. Like many vaccines and medicines it was touted by the company that produced it in a pamphlet in which the company itself said that the chicken pox really wasn't dangerous and that the reason they had researched and introduced the vaccine was financial. Since there were so many families in which both parents worked and since the normal course of the chicken pox was approximately two weeks the vaccine would insure that the parents would not be in the position of having to miss so much work. We declined the vaccine since that wasn't an issue for us, I was a SAHP, and in due course our son got the chicken pox, no problem.

Since that time twenty some years the intention of the vaccine has morphed into one of medical importance although the chicken pox have not changed and aren't that dangerous and the risk of complications very low. They also administer it several times over the course of childhood and adolescence and now advocate for the adult version to fight off shingles although its efficacy against shingles has really not been proven. So my thought is that you sell more vaccine and make more money if it's about "dire health concerns" rather than whether or not working parents must miss work when their child/children have the chicken pox.

So I am all for vaccinations when appropriate for individual children for diseases that are proven to be dangerous or deadly or for children with compromised immunity. On the other hand for common childhood diseases that are generally not threats to the healthy children or others in the community I believe that parents should make the choice. If children who are not vaccinated do get such diseases they will then have the same immunity as provided by the vaccine and the disease itself should not be of consequence to the larger community since even though vaccination rates have fallen most children still are vaccinated. 






Elle.tea.22
by Bronze Member on Jul. 26, 2013 at 5:22 PM
I had measles when I was little and it was no worse than chicken pox. I had fevers, still got to play, watch movies, sleep in, not go to school. And I have no scars and I'm still here so... No biggie really. My mom took care of me <3 stayed home from work and kept her distance but gave me oatmeal baths and rubbed me down with calamine lotion (wearing gloves lol). The tub was mine and I got to play in the water as long as I liked. Yay! She disinfected everything I touched and pretty much threw stuff away as I got better. It was pretty cool to be sick actually.
lilblu399
by Tamika on Jul. 26, 2013 at 5:23 PM
3 moms liked this
It's not from the children. Most resurgences stem from adults lacking boosters. The whooping cough 'epidemic?' Came from adults. Even with vaccines, the virus can be spread, vaccines do not block the virus, it just teaches your body what to look for and even vaccines can fail, they are not 100%
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