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Sensory Processing Disorder

Posted by on Aug. 19, 2013 at 7:12 PM
  • 7 Replies

My 3 year old DD was just diagnosed today with Sensory Processing Disorder (Sensory Integration Dysfunction). I'm still figuring out what all of that means. We've been dealing with her motor skill delays since she was 18 months old, but I can't say I was expecting this when we took her for an appointment at our Women's & Children's Hospital.

Have any of you dealt with this? Does your child have it? Just looking for some advice, support, guidance. Anything really!

Thanks ladies!

by on Aug. 19, 2013 at 7:12 PM
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Replies (1-7):
NDADanceMom
by on Aug. 19, 2013 at 7:18 PM

I teach special ed and there is a huge range in outcomes for this diagnosis.  Some kids dont like glue on their hands and you dont notice an issue until its art time.  Other kids wear headphones to dampen noises because they cant handle typical school sounds.  You will just have to figure it out together as you go along.  You should be looking for a good OT and find a preschool that has a program for kids with diagnoses such as your child. 


nikkikry
by Gold Member on Aug. 19, 2013 at 7:27 PM
Thank you! I appreciate the input. She has been seeing an OT 2x/week and a PT 1x/week since she was 20 months old in our home. I talked to her OT after the appointment and we are going to work on developing the sensory program for us to use at home. Since DD turned 3 a few months back she will be aging out of Early Intervention next week and has already been approved for services through the school district. Starting in Sept she'll be seeing the same OT and getting a new PT. The only structured preschool in our rural area is the Head Start provider. We have her on the waiting list for that, but we are over the income limit. I will call them with this diagnosis tomorrow in hopes it will move her up the list. But other than that we don't have a lot of options where we are. I'll talk to the OT and see if she knows of any other places we could enroll her. The doctor said the same thing, we should get her into a program for the structure and services.
Quoting NDADanceMom:

I teach special ed and there is a huge range in outcomes for this diagnosis.  Some kids dont like glue on their hands and you dont notice an issue until its art time.  Other kids wear headphones to dampen noises because they cant handle typical school sounds.  You will just have to figure it out together as you go along.  You should be looking for a good OT and find a preschool that has a program for kids with diagnoses such as your child. 



Hazelnutkin
by on Aug. 19, 2013 at 9:14 PM

 My five year old has sensory issues. We see an OT. She has a fine motor delay, but her biggest problem seems to be that she cannot tell where her body is in space so she crashes into things and she applies too much pressure. She is a sensory seeker. She also enjoys that crazy, chaotic, wound-up state. Sometimes I swear she is trying to provoke us to spank her because she wants that physical imput, To others she looks like a wild child, I'm sure. We are seeing progress with the OT and maturity. If your OT is good, I think it will really be helpful.

EmilyG10
by on Aug. 19, 2013 at 9:23 PM

I've been told to read this book called the out of sync child by carol somkething.. my son is having some issuses related to this noone has named it but know he has things he needs to work on. I'm looking for the same things you are. I have noone to talk about this really besides my husband.

poshkat
by Platinum Member on Aug. 19, 2013 at 9:45 PM
Prepare yourself. We have been dealing with spd for almost 4 years since ds was diagnosed. Occupational therapy is great. Deep tissue brushing is a miracle. Clothes, tags and seams are especially bad for ds. They use all sorts of things like bumpy pillows, which are v shaped pillows with little bumps all over them to help the kids sit comfortably, pressure jackets to get them comfotable sitting next to people since spd can make them antsy because people are in their space and even the slightest touch can make them uncomfortable.

They had some kids chew on soft plastic tubes to help desensitize them because spd can be a problem with food textures. There are so many other things they do. One time they put down a tarp and sprayed shaving cream on it and let the kids play with it to show them it's a nice texture. Somekids didn't like it so they redirected them.

The rice bin was great too. They let the kids sit in it to calm down.

They have a ton of things I probably forgot but the main thing is to keep an open mind. Some of the things they do kay seem weird but they do work.
Imjustinsmommy
by on Aug. 19, 2013 at 9:54 PM

like many said..  every child has it to a different degree & in a different way.

 my ds1  was diagnoised but is known to be " sensory" and he has fine motor delays as well.. he has been getting services too since he was 15 months or so & is now 5 yrs old..  he still has  some issues but working with an OT and PT  he really has come far. he used to be VERY senitive to noise but now only sometimes it seems to bother him.. he;s  getting used to it. he is picky still about consiatncies w/ food but slightly open to trying more foods. he wasnt a severe case but it was moderate & now its mild id say..

 he still has fine motor delays but still gets it 3x a week. we use all the services we can get & practice at home as well & he is going into kinddergarten in a couple of weeks & the school is proviing  services too.

 stick with it, be patient & it will  be ok!

JocelynMoods
by Member on Aug. 20, 2013 at 1:57 PM

There is a lot of stuff about it online. I've recently been looking for auditory processing problems and found some stuff bout it. 

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