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Taking antibiotics when you don't need them.

Posted by on Oct. 14, 2013 at 10:21 PM
  • 19 Replies

Ok, so here is what I used to think. If you take antibiotics when you don't need them it will increase the amount of antibiotic resistant bacteria and damn those doctors for over prescribing medication.

Now here is what I am learning in my microbial genetics class. Its been proven that genetic mutations happen in bacteria in the absence of selection and are not a response to selection.

Hmmm. So what you are telling me is that bacteria can and will become antibiotic resistant regardless of how many antibiotics we take.

What does still hold true is that when prescribed and antibiotic, you must take all of it!!! Otherwise you are killing off bacteria with no mutations and leaving bacteria with the mutations alive so that they can continue to reproduce and spread their antibiotic resistant genes.

Anyone else know anything on the subject?

by on Oct. 14, 2013 at 10:21 PM
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Replies (1-10):
DallasCowboys81
by Platinum Member on Oct. 14, 2013 at 11:07 PM
Ok heres a question i have had a.cough since June. It comes and goes and its the same cough. I have been on 3 types of antibiotics and took all of them,.. Im still coughing up mucous. Im refusing to go to the doc because obciously antibiotics are not working, why would that be?
frndlyfn
by Emerald Member on Oct. 14, 2013 at 11:08 PM
1 mom liked this

Nope.  I am just glad dd has not needed antibiotics other than at birth.  She is 7 yrs old.

lovebugs_mom906
by on Oct. 14, 2013 at 11:20 PM
You and my brother could have quite the conversation lol. He got his degree in biology, and knows the ins and outs of most bacteria, illnesses and other "things" along those lines.
lunyuny
by on Oct. 14, 2013 at 11:23 PM
No not really
ditsyjo
by Gold Member on Oct. 15, 2013 at 2:22 AM

they will mutate on their own but they mutate faster if you get antibiotics and don't use them all... also demanding antibiotics when it is a virus does absolutly nothing for you...

SissyAnn141
by on Oct. 15, 2013 at 2:36 AM

 

Quoting DallasCowboys81:

Ok heres a question i have had a.cough since June. It comes and goes and its the same cough. I have been on 3 types of antibiotics and took all of them,.. Im still coughing up mucous. Im refusing to go to the doc because obciously antibiotics are not working, why would that be?

 DO YOU SMOKE ?

Piskie
by Gold Member on Oct. 15, 2013 at 3:09 AM
The process goes q hell of a lot faster with people taking antibiotics when they don't need them.
Schauseil
by Bronze Member on Oct. 15, 2013 at 9:15 AM
I might ask my professor about this. If mutations happen in the absence of selection then antibiotics should have no affect on the rate of mutations.


Quoting Piskie:

The process goes q hell of a lot faster with people taking antibiotics when they don't need them.

Piskie
by Gold Member on Oct. 15, 2013 at 11:35 AM
Taking anti biotics leaves only those immune to the drug alive. Over a large population, this speeds up the process, as many people took them when they weren't needed.


Quoting Schauseil:

I might ask my professor about this. If mutations happen in the absence of selection then antibiotics should have no affect on the rate of mutations.




Quoting Piskie:

The process goes q hell of a lot faster with people taking antibiotics when they don't need them.


Schauseil
by Bronze Member on Oct. 15, 2013 at 12:21 PM
Right. I'm not talking about the replication of a mutation that has already happened though. I'm talking about when the mutation happens. According to the study, which I will provide when I get to my notes, when a genetic mutation happens, it isn't the reponse to selctive pressure. Now does selective pressure also mean stressor? I DON't know. But it is very interesting.


Quoting Piskie:

Taking anti biotics leaves only those immune to the drug alive. Over a large population, this speeds up the process, as many people took them when they weren't needed.




Quoting Schauseil:

I might ask my professor about this. If mutations happen in the absence of selection then antibiotics should have no affect on the rate of mutations.






Quoting Piskie:

The process goes q hell of a lot faster with people taking antibiotics when they don't need them.



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