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Moms of diabetics

Posted by on Nov. 16, 2013 at 10:08 PM
  • 10 Replies
Ladies, what were your diabetic child's symptoms?

I'm concerned that my oldest DD might be diabetic. I know the symptoms for adults, since it runs in my family, but they were all diagnosed in their 30's or older. I just wasn't sure if the symptoms were different for children.
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by on Nov. 16, 2013 at 10:08 PM
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Replies (1-10):
frndlyfn
by Emerald Member on Nov. 16, 2013 at 10:23 PM

are you thinking type 1 or type 2?

Symptoms

By Mayo Clinic staff

The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children usually develop quickly, over a period of weeks. Look for:

  • Increased thirst and frequent urination. As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.
  • Extreme hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become energy depleted. This triggers intense hunger.
  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight — sometimes rapidly. Without the energy sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often the first sign to be noticed.
  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and lethargic.
  • Irritability or unusual behavior. Children with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes may suddenly seem moody or irritable.
  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.
  • Yeast infection. Girls with type 1 diabetes may have a genital yeast infection, and babies can develop diaper rash caused by yeast.

When to see a doctor 
Talk to your child's doctor if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 1 diabetes — increased thirst and frequent urination, extreme hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, or fatigue.


Symptoms

By Mayo Clinic staff


Type 2 diabetes in children may develop gradually. Some children who have type 2 diabetes have no signs or symptoms. Others experience:

  • Increased thirst and urination.As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.
  • Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers hunger.
  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight. Without the energy sugar supplies to your cells, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink.
  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and irritable.
  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.
  • Slow-healing sores or frequent infections. Type 2 diabetes affects your child's ability to heal and resist infections.
  • Areas of darkened skin. Areas of darkened skin (acanthosis nigricans) may be a sign of insulin resistance. These dark patches often occur in the armpits or neck.

When to see a doctor 
See you child's doctor if your child is at high risk of type 2 diabetes. To diagnose type 2 diabetes before it does serious damage, diabetes screening is recommended for all children and adolescents at high risk, even if they have no signs or symptoms of the condition. Your child may be at high risk if he or she:

  • Has a body mass index (BMI) above the 85th percentile
  • Has a sibling, parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle or cousin with type 2 diabetes
  • Is black, Hispanic, Native American, Asian-American or Pacific Islander, as these racial groups have a higher incidence of type 2 diabetes
  • Has signs of insulin resistance, such as darkened skin on the neck

Talk to your child's doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 2 diabetes — increased thirst and urination, increased hunger, weight loss, fatigue, blurred vision, slow-healing sores or frequent infections.

beadingmom17
by Rachel on Nov. 16, 2013 at 10:30 PM
Type 1. She has been going to the bathroom a ridiculous amount (like every 10 minutes she's saying she needs to pee), has been guzzling her drinks and complaining she's thirsty, she's been so cranky but esp when she has anything evenly slightly sugary, and has been complaining of headaches off and on.

Quoting frndlyfn:

are you thinking type 1 or type 2?

Symptoms

By Mayo Clinic staff

The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children usually develop quickly, over a period of weeks. Look for:

  • Increased thirst and frequent urination. As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.
  • Extreme hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become energy depleted. This triggers intense hunger.
  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight — sometimes rapidly. Without the energy sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often the first sign to be noticed.
  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and lethargic.
  • Irritability or unusual behavior. Children with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes may suddenly seem moody or irritable.
  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.
  • Yeast infection. Girls with type 1 diabetes may have a genital yeast infection, and babies can develop diaper rash caused by yeast.

When to see a doctor 
Talk to your child's doctor if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 1 diabetes — increased thirst and frequent urination, extreme hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, or fatigue.


Symptoms

By Mayo Clinic staff


Type 2 diabetes in children may develop gradually. Some children who have type 2 diabetes have no signs or symptoms. Others experience:

  • Increased thirst and urination.As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.
  • Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers hunger.
  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight. Without the energy sugar supplies to your cells, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink.
  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and irritable.
  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.
  • Slow-healing sores or frequent infections. Type 2 diabetes affects your child's ability to heal and resist infections.
  • Areas of darkened skin. Areas of darkened skin (acanthosis nigricans) may be a sign of insulin resistance. These dark patches often occur in the armpits or neck.

When to see a doctor 
See you child's doctor if your child is at high risk of type 2 diabetes. To diagnose type 2 diabetes before it does serious damage, diabetes screening is recommended for all children and adolescents at high risk, even if they have no signs or symptoms of the condition. Your child may be at high risk if he or she:

  • Has a body mass index (BMI) above the 85th percentile
  • Has a sibling, parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle or cousin with type 2 diabetes
  • Is black, Hispanic, Native American, Asian-American or Pacific Islander, as these racial groups have a higher incidence of type 2 diabetes
  • Has signs of insulin resistance, such as darkened skin on the neck

Talk to your child's doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 2 diabetes — increased thirst and urination, increased hunger, weight loss, fatigue, blurred vision, slow-healing sores or frequent infections.

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
frndlyfn
by Emerald Member on Nov. 16, 2013 at 10:36 PM

I think it is time to get her checked out.  I do not have any children with diabetes so i do not know the journey of diagnosis.

beadingmom17
by Rachel on Nov. 16, 2013 at 10:44 PM
Yeah, I'm going to call Monday. It seems like it's becoming worse.

Quoting frndlyfn:

I think it is time to get her checked out.  I do not have any children with diabetes so i do not know the journey of diagnosis.

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
daughteroftruth
by on Nov. 16, 2013 at 10:49 PM

 If you suspect that she is a type one diabetic, you need to have her looked at asap.  She could be fine now, then hours later be in Diabetic Keto Acidosis.  My dh is type one, his onset was age 22.  Symptoms for onset are going to be similar regardless of age.  One day he was just really thirsty and peeing a ton, two days later he was throwing up and could hardly walk and was very close to death.  Same with his sister at age 17.  Started peeing a ton, constantly thirsty, then got sick, my inlaws thought she had the flu, by the time they got her admitted to the hospital, she was in a coma. 

if you are not sure about taking her, then at least go to the store and buy a meter, you can buy pretty cheap ones at Walmart and you do not need a script for the strips, the strips are pricey, but checking her bs now would be a really good idea.

Quoting beadingmom17:

Type 1. She has been going to the bathroom a ridiculous amount (like every 10 minutes she's saying she needs to pee), has been guzzling her drinks and complaining she's thirsty, she's been so cranky but esp when she has anything evenly slightly sugary, and has been complaining of headaches off and on.

Quoting frndlyfn:

are you thinking type 1 or type 2?

Symptoms

By Mayo Clinic staff

The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children usually develop quickly, over a period of weeks. Look for:

  • Increased thirst and frequent urination. As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.
  • Extreme hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become energy depleted. This triggers intense hunger.
  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight — sometimes rapidly. Without the energy sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often the first sign to be noticed.
  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and lethargic.
  • Irritability or unusual behavior. Children with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes may suddenly seem moody or irritable.
  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.
  • Yeast infection. Girls with type 1 diabetes may have a genital yeast infection, and babies can develop diaper rash caused by yeast.

When to see a doctor 
Talk to your child's doctor if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 1 diabetes — increased thirst and frequent urination, extreme hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, or fatigue.

 

Symptoms

By Mayo Clinic staff


Type 2 diabetes in children may develop gradually. Some children who have type 2 diabetes have no signs or symptoms. Others experience:

  • Increased thirst and urination.As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.
  • Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers hunger.
  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight. Without the energy sugar supplies to your cells, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink.
  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and irritable.
  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.
  • Slow-healing sores or frequent infections. Type 2 diabetes affects your child's ability to heal and resist infections.
  • Areas of darkened skin. Areas of darkened skin (acanthosis nigricans) may be a sign of insulin resistance. These dark patches often occur in the armpits or neck.

When to see a doctor 
See you child's doctor if your child is at high risk of type 2 diabetes. To diagnose type 2 diabetes before it does serious damage, diabetes screening is recommended for all children and adolescents at high risk, even if they have no signs or symptoms of the condition. Your child may be at high risk if he or she:

  • Has a body mass index (BMI) above the 85th percentile
  • Has a sibling, parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle or cousin with type 2 diabetes
  • Is black, Hispanic, Native American, Asian-American or Pacific Islander, as these racial groups have a higher incidence of type 2 diabetes
  • Has signs of insulin resistance, such as darkened skin on the neck

Talk to your child's doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 2 diabetes — increased thirst and urination, increased hunger, weight loss, fatigue, blurred vision, slow-healing sores or frequent infections.

 

beadingmom17
by Rachel on Nov. 16, 2013 at 10:53 PM
I'm calling her doctor on Monday

Quoting daughteroftruth:

 If you suspect that she is a type one diabetic, you need to have her looked at asap.  She could be fine now, then hours later be in Diabetic Keto Acidosis.  My dh is type one, his onset was age 22.  Symptoms for onset are going to be similar regardless of age.  One day he was just really thirsty and peeing a ton, two days later he was throwing up and could hardly walk and was very close to death.  Same with his sister at age 17.  Started peeing a ton, constantly thirsty, then got sick, my inlaws thought she had the flu, by the time they got her admitted to the hospital, she was in a coma. 


if you are not sure about taking her, then at least go to the store and buy a meter, you can buy pretty cheap ones at Walmart and you do not need a script for the strips, the strips are pricey, but checking her bs now would be a really good idea.


Quoting beadingmom17:

Type 1. She has been going to the bathroom a ridiculous amount (like every 10 minutes she's saying she needs to pee), has been guzzling her drinks and complaining she's thirsty, she's been so cranky but esp when she has anything evenly slightly sugary, and has been complaining of headaches off and on.


Quoting frndlyfn:


are you thinking type 1 or type 2?


Symptoms


By Mayo Clinic staff



The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children usually develop quickly, over a period of weeks. Look for:



  • Increased thirst and frequent urination. As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.

  • Extreme hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become energy depleted. This triggers intense hunger.

  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight — sometimes rapidly. Without the energy sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often the first sign to be noticed.

  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and lethargic.

  • Irritability or unusual behavior. Children with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes may suddenly seem moody or irritable.

  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.

  • Yeast infection. Girls with type 1 diabetes may have a genital yeast infection, and babies can develop diaper rash caused by yeast.


When to see a doctor 
Talk to your child's doctor if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 1 diabetes — increased thirst and frequent urination, extreme hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, or fatigue.


 


Symptoms


By Mayo Clinic staff





Type 2 diabetes in children may develop gradually. Some children who have type 2 diabetes have no signs or symptoms. Others experience:



  • Increased thirst and urination.As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.

  • Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers hunger.

  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight. Without the energy sugar supplies to your cells, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink.

  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and irritable.

  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.

  • Slow-healing sores or frequent infections. Type 2 diabetes affects your child's ability to heal and resist infections.

  • Areas of darkened skin. Areas of darkened skin (acanthosis nigricans) may be a sign of insulin resistance. These dark patches often occur in the armpits or neck.

When to see a doctor 
See you child's doctor if your child is at high risk of type 2 diabetes. To diagnose type 2 diabetes before it does serious damage, diabetes screening is recommended for all children and adolescents at high risk, even if they have no signs or symptoms of the condition. Your child may be at high risk if he or she:



  • Has a body mass index (BMI) above the 85th percentile

  • Has a sibling, parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle or cousin with type 2 diabetes

  • Is black, Hispanic, Native American, Asian-American or Pacific Islander, as these racial groups have a higher incidence of type 2 diabetes

  • Has signs of insulin resistance, such as darkened skin on the neck

Talk to your child's doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 2 diabetes — increased thirst and urination, increased hunger, weight loss, fatigue, blurred vision, slow-healing sores or frequent infections.


 

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
daughteroftruth
by on Nov. 16, 2013 at 11:01 PM

 100% honest here, if it were my kid, and it could very well be one of my kids in the future as they have a family history of type one.. I would be getting a meter asap, like running to the store now(course, we have a meter, but you get my point), if their blood sugar was elevated, I would not be waiting till monday, they would be in the ER tonight. 

If she starts to feel achy, overly tiered, or throws up, take her to the er.. if she starts throwing up, its already become a medical emergancy... the risks of cardiac arrest are high with DKA.  My best friend growing up was a type one, her parents didn't know that she was a diabetic, she started to throw up, they took her to the doc, had they waited one more day she would have been dead. 

Does your doctor have an after hour line?  Can you call and talk to him about your concerns.  He may not want you to wait till monday to have her seen.

Quoting beadingmom17:

I'm calling her doctor on Monday

Quoting daughteroftruth:

 If you suspect that she is a type one diabetic, you need to have her looked at asap.  She could be fine now, then hours later be in Diabetic Keto Acidosis.  My dh is type one, his onset was age 22.  Symptoms for onset are going to be similar regardless of age.  One day he was just really thirsty and peeing a ton, two days later he was throwing up and could hardly walk and was very close to death.  Same with his sister at age 17.  Started peeing a ton, constantly thirsty, then got sick, my inlaws thought she had the flu, by the time they got her admitted to the hospital, she was in a coma. 


if you are not sure about taking her, then at least go to the store and buy a meter, you can buy pretty cheap ones at Walmart and you do not need a script for the strips, the strips are pricey, but checking her bs now would be a really good idea.


Quoting beadingmom17:

Type 1. She has been going to the bathroom a ridiculous amount (like every 10 minutes she's saying she needs to pee), has been guzzling her drinks and complaining she's thirsty, she's been so cranky but esp when she has anything evenly slightly sugary, and has been complaining of headaches off and on.


Quoting frndlyfn:


are you thinking type 1 or type 2?


Symptoms


By Mayo Clinic staff



The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children usually develop quickly, over a period of weeks. Look for:



  • Increased thirst and frequent urination. As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.

  • Extreme hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become energy depleted. This triggers intense hunger.

  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight — sometimes rapidly. Without the energy sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often the first sign to be noticed.

  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and lethargic.

  • Irritability or unusual behavior. Children with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes may suddenly seem moody or irritable.

  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.

  • Yeast infection. Girls with type 1 diabetes may have a genital yeast infection, and babies can develop diaper rash caused by yeast.


When to see a doctor 
Talk to your child's doctor if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 1 diabetes — increased thirst and frequent urination, extreme hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, or fatigue.


 


Symptoms


By Mayo Clinic staff





Type 2 diabetes in children may develop gradually. Some children who have type 2 diabetes have no signs or symptoms. Others experience:



  • Increased thirst and urination.As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.

  • Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers hunger.

  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight. Without the energy sugar supplies to your cells, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink.

  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and irritable.

  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.

  • Slow-healing sores or frequent infections. Type 2 diabetes affects your child's ability to heal and resist infections.

  • Areas of darkened skin. Areas of darkened skin (acanthosis nigricans) may be a sign of insulin resistance. These dark patches often occur in the armpits or neck.

When to see a doctor 
See you child's doctor if your child is at high risk of type 2 diabetes. To diagnose type 2 diabetes before it does serious damage, diabetes screening is recommended for all children and adolescents at high risk, even if they have no signs or symptoms of the condition. Your child may be at high risk if he or she:



  • Has a body mass index (BMI) above the 85th percentile

  • Has a sibling, parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle or cousin with type 2 diabetes

  • Is black, Hispanic, Native American, Asian-American or Pacific Islander, as these racial groups have a higher incidence of type 2 diabetes

  • Has signs of insulin resistance, such as darkened skin on the neck

Talk to your child's doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 2 diabetes — increased thirst and urination, increased hunger, weight loss, fatigue, blurred vision, slow-healing sores or frequent infections.


 

 

beadingmom17
by Rachel on Nov. 16, 2013 at 11:08 PM
My mom is diabetic and has a meter. I'll test her in the morning (it's 11 pm here), since she's sleeping right now. If it's elevated, there is an "after hours" clinic we can go to in the morning.

Quoting daughteroftruth:

 100% honest here, if it were my kid, and it could very well be one of my kids in the future as they have a family history of type one.. I would be getting a meter asap, like running to the store now(course, we have a meter, but you get my point), if their blood sugar was elevated, I would not be waiting till monday, they would be in the ER tonight. 


If she starts to feel achy, overly tiered, or throws up, take her to the er.. if she starts throwing up, its already become a medical emergancy... the risks of cardiac arrest are high with DKA.  My best friend growing up was a type one, her parents didn't know that she was a diabetic, she started to throw up, they took her to the doc, had they waited one more day she would have been dead. 


Does your doctor have an after hour line?  Can you call and talk to him about your concerns.  He may not want you to wait till monday to have her seen.


Quoting beadingmom17:

I'm calling her doctor on Monday


Quoting daughteroftruth:


 If you suspect that she is a type one diabetic, you need to have her looked at asap.  She could be fine now, then hours later be in Diabetic Keto Acidosis.  My dh is type one, his onset was age 22.  Symptoms for onset are going to be similar regardless of age.  One day he was just really thirsty and peeing a ton, two days later he was throwing up and could hardly walk and was very close to death.  Same with his sister at age 17.  Started peeing a ton, constantly thirsty, then got sick, my inlaws thought she had the flu, by the time they got her admitted to the hospital, she was in a coma. 



if you are not sure about taking her, then at least go to the store and buy a meter, you can buy pretty cheap ones at Walmart and you do not need a script for the strips, the strips are pricey, but checking her bs now would be a really good idea.



Quoting beadingmom17:

Type 1. She has been going to the bathroom a ridiculous amount (like every 10 minutes she's saying she needs to pee), has been guzzling her drinks and complaining she's thirsty, she's been so cranky but esp when she has anything evenly slightly sugary, and has been complaining of headaches off and on.



Quoting frndlyfn:



are you thinking type 1 or type 2?



Symptoms



By Mayo Clinic staff





The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children usually develop quickly, over a period of weeks. Look for:





  • Increased thirst and frequent urination. As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.


  • Extreme hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become energy depleted. This triggers intense hunger.


  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight — sometimes rapidly. Without the energy sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often the first sign to be noticed.


  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and lethargic.


  • Irritability or unusual behavior. Children with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes may suddenly seem moody or irritable.


  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.


  • Yeast infection. Girls with type 1 diabetes may have a genital yeast infection, and babies can develop diaper rash caused by yeast.




When to see a doctor 
Talk to your child's doctor if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 1 diabetes — increased thirst and frequent urination, extreme hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, or fatigue.



 



Symptoms



By Mayo Clinic staff








Type 2 diabetes in children may develop gradually. Some children who have type 2 diabetes have no signs or symptoms. Others experience:





  • Increased thirst and urination.As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.


  • Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers hunger.


  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight. Without the energy sugar supplies to your cells, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink.


  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and irritable.


  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.


  • Slow-healing sores or frequent infections. Type 2 diabetes affects your child's ability to heal and resist infections.


  • Areas of darkened skin. Areas of darkened skin (acanthosis nigricans) may be a sign of insulin resistance. These dark patches often occur in the armpits or neck.


When to see a doctor 
See you child's doctor if your child is at high risk of type 2 diabetes. To diagnose type 2 diabetes before it does serious damage, diabetes screening is recommended for all children and adolescents at high risk, even if they have no signs or symptoms of the condition. Your child may be at high risk if he or she:





  • Has a body mass index (BMI) above the 85th percentile


  • Has a sibling, parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle or cousin with type 2 diabetes


  • Is black, Hispanic, Native American, Asian-American or Pacific Islander, as these racial groups have a higher incidence of type 2 diabetes


  • Has signs of insulin resistance, such as darkened skin on the neck


Talk to your child's doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 2 diabetes — increased thirst and urination, increased hunger, weight loss, fatigue, blurred vision, slow-healing sores or frequent infections.



 


 

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
daughteroftruth
by on Nov. 16, 2013 at 11:13 PM
1 mom liked this

 Good and good luck... i really hope its something else.  its a difficult disease to live with, and its a very difficult to watch someone you love live with it. 

Quoting beadingmom17:

My mom is diabetic and has a meter. I'll test her in the morning (it's 11 pm here), since she's sleeping right now. If it's elevated, there is an "after hours" clinic we can go to in the morning.

Quoting daughteroftruth:

 100% honest here, if it were my kid, and it could very well be one of my kids in the future as they have a family history of type one.. I would be getting a meter asap, like running to the store now(course, we have a meter, but you get my point), if their blood sugar was elevated, I would not be waiting till monday, they would be in the ER tonight. 


If she starts to feel achy, overly tiered, or throws up, take her to the er.. if she starts throwing up, its already become a medical emergancy... the risks of cardiac arrest are high with DKA.  My best friend growing up was a type one, her parents didn't know that she was a diabetic, she started to throw up, they took her to the doc, had they waited one more day she would have been dead. 


Does your doctor have an after hour line?  Can you call and talk to him about your concerns.  He may not want you to wait till monday to have her seen.


Quoting beadingmom17:

I'm calling her doctor on Monday


Quoting daughteroftruth:


 If you suspect that she is a type one diabetic, you need to have her looked at asap.  She could be fine now, then hours later be in Diabetic Keto Acidosis.  My dh is type one, his onset was age 22.  Symptoms for onset are going to be similar regardless of age.  One day he was just really thirsty and peeing a ton, two days later he was throwing up and could hardly walk and was very close to death.  Same with his sister at age 17.  Started peeing a ton, constantly thirsty, then got sick, my inlaws thought she had the flu, by the time they got her admitted to the hospital, she was in a coma. 



if you are not sure about taking her, then at least go to the store and buy a meter, you can buy pretty cheap ones at Walmart and you do not need a script for the strips, the strips are pricey, but checking her bs now would be a really good idea.



Quoting beadingmom17:

Type 1. She has been going to the bathroom a ridiculous amount (like every 10 minutes she's saying she needs to pee), has been guzzling her drinks and complaining she's thirsty, she's been so cranky but esp when she has anything evenly slightly sugary, and has been complaining of headaches off and on.



Quoting frndlyfn:



are you thinking type 1 or type 2?



Symptoms



By Mayo Clinic staff





The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children usually develop quickly, over a period of weeks. Look for:





  • Increased thirst and frequent urination. As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.


  • Extreme hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become energy depleted. This triggers intense hunger.


  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight — sometimes rapidly. Without the energy sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often the first sign to be noticed.


  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and lethargic.


  • Irritability or unusual behavior. Children with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes may suddenly seem moody or irritable.


  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.


  • Yeast infection. Girls with type 1 diabetes may have a genital yeast infection, and babies can develop diaper rash caused by yeast.




When to see a doctor 
Talk to your child's doctor if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 1 diabetes — increased thirst and frequent urination, extreme hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, or fatigue.



 



Symptoms



By Mayo Clinic staff








Type 2 diabetes in children may develop gradually. Some children who have type 2 diabetes have no signs or symptoms. Others experience:





  • Increased thirst and urination.As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.


  • Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers hunger.


  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight. Without the energy sugar supplies to your cells, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink.


  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and irritable.


  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.


  • Slow-healing sores or frequent infections. Type 2 diabetes affects your child's ability to heal and resist infections.


  • Areas of darkened skin. Areas of darkened skin (acanthosis nigricans) may be a sign of insulin resistance. These dark patches often occur in the armpits or neck.


When to see a doctor 
See you child's doctor if your child is at high risk of type 2 diabetes. To diagnose type 2 diabetes before it does serious damage, diabetes screening is recommended for all children and adolescents at high risk, even if they have no signs or symptoms of the condition. Your child may be at high risk if he or she:





  • Has a body mass index (BMI) above the 85th percentile


  • Has a sibling, parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle or cousin with type 2 diabetes


  • Is black, Hispanic, Native American, Asian-American or Pacific Islander, as these racial groups have a higher incidence of type 2 diabetes


  • Has signs of insulin resistance, such as darkened skin on the neck


Talk to your child's doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 2 diabetes — increased thirst and urination, increased hunger, weight loss, fatigue, blurred vision, slow-healing sores or frequent infections.



 


 

 

beadingmom17
by Rachel on Nov. 16, 2013 at 11:25 PM
Unfortunately, it runs rampant in my family,so I'm pretty used to it...my great-Grandpa had it, my Grandpa had it, my mom has it, my uncle has it, I'm pre-diabetic...

I hope it's something else, too, but genetics are not on her side :/


Quoting daughteroftruth:

 Good and good luck... i really hope its something else.  its a difficult disease to live with, and its a very difficult to watch someone you love live with it. 


Quoting beadingmom17:

My mom is diabetic and has a meter. I'll test her in the morning (it's 11 pm here), since she's sleeping right now. If it's elevated, there is an "after hours" clinic we can go to in the morning.


Quoting daughteroftruth:


 100% honest here, if it were my kid, and it could very well be one of my kids in the future as they have a family history of type one.. I would be getting a meter asap, like running to the store now(course, we have a meter, but you get my point), if their blood sugar was elevated, I would not be waiting till monday, they would be in the ER tonight. 



If she starts to feel achy, overly tiered, or throws up, take her to the er.. if she starts throwing up, its already become a medical emergancy... the risks of cardiac arrest are high with DKA.  My best friend growing up was a type one, her parents didn't know that she was a diabetic, she started to throw up, they took her to the doc, had they waited one more day she would have been dead. 



Does your doctor have an after hour line?  Can you call and talk to him about your concerns.  He may not want you to wait till monday to have her seen.



Quoting beadingmom17:

I'm calling her doctor on Monday



Quoting daughteroftruth:



 If you suspect that she is a type one diabetic, you need to have her looked at asap.  She could be fine now, then hours later be in Diabetic Keto Acidosis.  My dh is type one, his onset was age 22.  Symptoms for onset are going to be similar regardless of age.  One day he was just really thirsty and peeing a ton, two days later he was throwing up and could hardly walk and was very close to death.  Same with his sister at age 17.  Started peeing a ton, constantly thirsty, then got sick, my inlaws thought she had the flu, by the time they got her admitted to the hospital, she was in a coma. 




if you are not sure about taking her, then at least go to the store and buy a meter, you can buy pretty cheap ones at Walmart and you do not need a script for the strips, the strips are pricey, but checking her bs now would be a really good idea.




Quoting beadingmom17:

Type 1. She has been going to the bathroom a ridiculous amount (like every 10 minutes she's saying she needs to pee), has been guzzling her drinks and complaining she's thirsty, she's been so cranky but esp when she has anything evenly slightly sugary, and has been complaining of headaches off and on.




Quoting frndlyfn:




are you thinking type 1 or type 2?




Symptoms




By Mayo Clinic staff







The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes in children usually develop quickly, over a period of weeks. Look for:







  • Increased thirst and frequent urination. As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.



  • Extreme hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become energy depleted. This triggers intense hunger.



  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight — sometimes rapidly. Without the energy sugar supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often the first sign to be noticed.



  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and lethargic.



  • Irritability or unusual behavior. Children with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes may suddenly seem moody or irritable.



  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.



  • Yeast infection. Girls with type 1 diabetes may have a genital yeast infection, and babies can develop diaper rash caused by yeast.






When to see a doctor 
Talk to your child's doctor if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 1 diabetes — increased thirst and frequent urination, extreme hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, or fatigue.




 




Symptoms




By Mayo Clinic staff











Type 2 diabetes in children may develop gradually. Some children who have type 2 diabetes have no signs or symptoms. Others experience:







  • Increased thirst and urination.As excess sugar builds up in your child's bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. This may leave your child thirsty. As a result, your child may drink — and urinate — more than usual.



  • Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your child's cells, your child's muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers hunger.



  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, your child may lose weight. Without the energy sugar supplies to your cells, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink.



  • Fatigue. If your child's cells are deprived of sugar, he or she may become tired and irritable.



  • Blurred vision. If your child's blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your child's eyes. This may affect your child's ability to focus clearly.



  • Slow-healing sores or frequent infections. Type 2 diabetes affects your child's ability to heal and resist infections.



  • Areas of darkened skin. Areas of darkened skin (acanthosis nigricans) may be a sign of insulin resistance. These dark patches often occur in the armpits or neck.



When to see a doctor 
See you child's doctor if your child is at high risk of type 2 diabetes. To diagnose type 2 diabetes before it does serious damage, diabetes screening is recommended for all children and adolescents at high risk, even if they have no signs or symptoms of the condition. Your child may be at high risk if he or she:







  • Has a body mass index (BMI) above the 85th percentile



  • Has a sibling, parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle or cousin with type 2 diabetes



  • Is black, Hispanic, Native American, Asian-American or Pacific Islander, as these racial groups have a higher incidence of type 2 diabetes



  • Has signs of insulin resistance, such as darkened skin on the neck



Talk to your child's doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any of the signs or symptoms of type 2 diabetes — increased thirst and urination, increased hunger, weight loss, fatigue, blurred vision, slow-healing sores or frequent infections.




 



 


 

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