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Any advice for interactive toys for 20 month old autistic girl

Posted by on Dec. 18, 2013 at 6:53 PM
  • 6 Replies

I am really new at this, and any advice would be greatly appreciated.  I read a book that explains how to interact with autistic kids using the Early Start Denver Model. (BTW, she goes to early intervention in january, but in the mean time, I really want to work with her). I have only been doing it for two days now, but I feel like my daughter is already bored with the interactive toys we are playing.  I tried pretend food and trying to get her to understand pouring tea into a cup.  All she wants to do is bang the food together.  I am trying to teach her to hug her baby doll, but she gets so mad whe I hug the doll she starts crying and then throws it.  I don't know, maybe this is too much for her. I have taken all of her old toys aways because they don't allow interaction.  She loves flipping the pages of books, so I try to point and explain the book, but she gets mad.

Am I doing something wrong here?  She is only 20 month old, so maybe I should be trying something else.  Anyone had success with something I could maybe try?

by on Dec. 18, 2013 at 6:53 PM
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Replies (1-6):
AJsMom81507
by Member on Dec. 18, 2013 at 7:31 PM

my DS was diagnosed at 15 months old.  i did not try to do it on my own, and followed his therapists suggestions.

your child will not learn as well as she will with the therapists.  also the toys you have are old to her.  therapists will usually bring "new stuff"

jconney80
by Gold Member on Dec. 18, 2013 at 10:58 PM
I guess it all depends on what she likes. I have 3 kids on the spectrum. I use the characters that they love and buy those toys then use them to interact. And just because she isn't responding right away doesn't mean you're doing it wrong. It can take numerous repetitions to see a result. What kinds of things is she into?

My son is 3.5 & he started to dislike reading any books. So, I started taking him to the library to get books that have things that he likes. Right now he's into Star Wars big time so I bought him some books to get him interested in being read to.
funhappymom
by Silver Member on Dec. 19, 2013 at 9:03 AM

I'm sorry. I don't have any experience with autism but there is a group for moms with kids on the spectrum. I bet they could help you.


LancesMom
by Ruby Member on Dec. 19, 2013 at 11:26 AM

Yes the Autism group would be perfect for you! The forum is full of tons of ideas. This will be a learning curve for her as well as you! Welcome to CafeMom!

AlissaM77
by on Dec. 19, 2013 at 12:08 PM

She mostly likes the iPad. We have a few apps for toddlers that she likes. The only problem with that is that she is so focused on it, she doesn't interact with us. I know we will learn a lot from the therapist, so I am anxious to take her. Until then, I am still going to try to work with her. 

Quoting jconney80: I guess it all depends on what she likes. I have 3 kids on the spectrum. I use the characters that they love and buy those toys then use them to interact. And just because she isn't responding right away doesn't mean you're doing it wrong. It can take numerous repetitions to see a result. What kinds of things is she into?

My son is 3.5 & he started to dislike reading any books. So, I started taking him to the library to get books that have things that he likes. Right now he's into Star Wars big time so I bought him some books to get him interested in being read to.


nerthus
by Member on Dec. 19, 2013 at 2:46 PM
1 mom liked this

My daughter has autism; she's in her 20's now but when she was a toddler she was so intrigued by busy beads and toys that had doors that would open with surprise characters or animal figures inside that would pop out or make animal sounds ; you had to either twist a knob, push a button, or something of the sort to get each door to open, and since she had developmental delays and weak fine motor control, it was useful for her to manipulate these knobs and buttons to open doors and to move the busy beads along the various tracks from one side of the toy to the other. She also loved blowing bubbles and having us blow bubbles, so to get her to focus and cooperate we would blow bubbles a minute, coax her to try whatever new toy or task we had for her, then blow more bubbles and praise her when she'd do what we asked. She started a program called Infant Stimulation through MHMR when she was 11 months old, was in that therapy program till age 3 and then we switched her to Early Childhood at our local public preschool. She started speech therapy there and had special ed and occupational therapy and did very well there.

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