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Winnie the Pooh is 'inappropriate'?

Posted by on Nov. 24, 2014 at 10:20 AM
  • 44 Replies

Winnie the Pooh Finally Banned for Being Half Naked, Thanks to Brave Town Members


Winnie the Pooh banned Polish

I cannot tell you how many times I have leaped in front of my young children’s eyes in order to shield them from the inappropriate, sexually ambiguous, perennially half-undressed, downright shocking sight of Winnie the Pooh. Winnie-the-Pooh author A.A. Milne is known for such homey quotes as “the smallest things take up the most room in your heart,” but as far as I’m concerned, more parents should take a cue from the Polish town of Tuszyn who sees Pooh for what he REALLY is: a disturbing hermaphrodite with murky intentions.

A Tuszyn council met recently to decide which famous children’s character should become the face of the town’s play area, and conservative members pointed out what I have been shouting from street corners for YEARS: Pooh is a mutilated creature whose lack of pants and freakishly smooth crotch creates trauma for innocent youngsters.

According to council member Ryszard Cichy,

The problem with that bear is it doesn’t have a complete wardrobe. [Poland’s fictional bear] is dressed from head to toe, unlike Pooh who is only dressed from the waist up

Hanna Jachimska added — keep in mind this meeting was recorded and leaked to the local press, so these are real adult opinions, which are thankfully being shared around the world — that Milne likely removed Pooh’s sexual body parts in a gruesome attack fueled by the author’s confused emotional state:

This is very disturbing but can you imagine! The author was over 60 and cut [Pooh’s] testicles off with a razor blade because he had a problem with his identity.

Thank god for the incredibly wise voices of this council. I cannot agree more that the only thing preferable to Pooh wearing pants would be if the illustrations lovingly detailed Pooh’s hairy, dangling genitalia — for instance, the way they dipped slightly into a pot of honey as he leaned in close to his friend Piglet. We can only hope that this Polish town will take the next logical step: re-publishing the Pooh books so that his gentle words are adjusted to include meaningful references to his anatomically correct body.

BEFORE: “If the person you are talking to doesn't appear to be listening, be patient. It may simply be that he has a small piece of fluff in his ear.”

AFTER: “If the person you are talking to doesn't appear to be listening, be patient. It may simply be that he is distracted by my protruding Pooh-Stick, for I am afflicted by Morning Hundred Acre Wood.”

Are you ready to join this Polish town in its righteous refusal to accept Winnie the Pooh as he’s been drawn for the last 86 years?

by on Nov. 24, 2014 at 10:20 AM
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Replies (1-10):
LysNVantesMom
by Bronze Member on Nov. 24, 2014 at 10:26 AM
1 mom liked this
Wow...I have always love pooh and friends! This is nuts!
Bmat
by Emerald Member on Nov. 25, 2014 at 10:05 AM
1 mom liked this

Nah.  He is already clothed with fur, the shirt is just adornment.

StreetsAhead
by Bronze Member on Nov. 25, 2014 at 10:11 AM
3 moms liked this
I have heard some ridiculous things but that has to be up there
Hottmomma607
by Trica on Nov. 25, 2014 at 11:00 AM
Right! And Tigger has on no clothes at all! WTH?? I love Tiggee btw! My favorite.

Quoting Bmat:

Nah.  He is already clothed with fur, the shirt is just adornment.

DACIA79
by Silver Member on Nov. 25, 2014 at 11:03 AM
1 mom liked this
This is worse than the Teletubbie scandal.
Hottmomma607
by Trica on Nov. 25, 2014 at 11:09 AM
Right! So dumb!

Quoting DACIA79: This is worse than the Teletubbie scandal.
Hottmomma607
by Trica on Nov. 25, 2014 at 11:10 AM

Mobile Photo

Let's clothe all of them! O_o
epoh
by on Nov. 25, 2014 at 11:12 AM
I can't believe you'd post this pornography on a MOM website!! Ugh.

Quoting Hottmomma607:

Mobile Photo

Let's clothe all of them! O_o
Night_Roane
by Platinum Member on Nov. 25, 2014 at 11:16 AM
Omg! I finally get an opportunity to share my knowledge! See, I fell down the rabbit hole that is Wikipedia and I learned like waaay too much about Winnie the Pooh.

You know that you spend too much time on Wikipedia (which then branched to news articles) when you learn that:

A. A. Milne (writer of Winnie the Pooh) was taught by H G Wells (The War of the Worlds, The Time Machine, The Invisible Man) at a school run by Milne's father.

The character Christopher Robin was his real-life son.

During pregnancy, it was thought that Christopher Robin was a girl. After his birth, his parents each assigned him a name.

Christopher Robin Milne's stuffed bear, originally named "Edward", was renamed "Winnie-the-Pooh" after a Canadian black bear named Winnie at the London Zoo. The pooh comes from a swan called "Pooh" his son met while on holiday.

Pooh the swan appears as a character in its own right in When We Were Very Young - also written by A. A. Milne

E. H. Shepard illustrated the original Pooh books. Shepard won a scholarship to the Royal Academy Schools. By 1906 Shepard had become a successful illustrator, having produced work for illustrated editions of Aesop's Fables.

Eventually, Shepard grew to resent "that silly old bear" and felt that these illustrations overshadowed his other work.

Winnie the Pooh was based off of an Alpha Farnell teddy bear that Christopher Robin received for his first birthday. However, the illustrations of Pooh were based on Shepard's son's teddy bear.

The success of his children's books was to become a source of considerable annoyance to Milne, whose self-avowed aim was to write whatever he pleased. He had made a considerable reputation as a playwright and produced a witty piece of detective writing in The Red House Mystery. But Milne had, in his own words, "said goodbye to all that in 70,000 words" (the approximate length of his four principal children's books).

Milne tried to reduce the damage by vowing in 1928 never to write another children's book, but it was too late. He also excused himself by saying that Christopher Robin was "Billy" at home and hardly the same person at all.

When A.A. Milne went to America in 1931 it was Christopher Robin everyone was interested in. Parents Magazine named him one of the most famous children in the world.

Christopher Robin, once he started school, was mocked by his peers, who recited passages from the books. At 13 he transferred to Stowe School, an independent boys' school in Buckinghamshire, where he learned to box as a way to defend himself from his classmates' taunts.

As Christopher Robin became a young adult, he began to resent what he saw as his father's exploitation of his childhood and came to hate the books that had thrust him into the public eye. He even wrote, "It seemed to me almost that my father had got to where he was by climbing upon my infant shoulders, that he had filched from me my good name and had left me with the empty fame of being his son."

Christopher Robin's maternal uncle Aubrey de Sélincourt had won an open classical scholarship to University College, Oxford. His principal avocation was sailing and writing, with over 24 books credited to his authorship. He edited The Oxford Magazine from 1927 to 1929 is best known for his translations (all for Penguin Classics).

Sélincourt had a daughter, Lesley, who married her first cousin, Christopher Robin.

In 1974, Christopher Robin published the first of three autobiographical books. The Enchanted Places gave an account of his childhood and of the problems he had encountered because of the Pooh books. He gave the original stuffed animals that inspired the Pooh characters to the books' editor, saying that that he preferred to concentrate on the things that currently interested him. The editor, in turn, donated them to the New York Public Library.

The fictional Hundred Acre Wood of the Pooh stories derives from Five Hundred Acre Wood in Ashdown Forest in South East England. Christopher Robin stayed at an estate in the northern edge of the forest at Cotchford Farm as a child.

Rabbit and Owl were created by A. A. Milne's imagination. The book focuses on the adventures of a teddy bear called Winnie-the-Pooh and his friends Piglet, a small toy pig; Eeyore, a toy donkey; Owl, a live owl; and Rabbit, a live rabbit. The characters of Kanga, a toy kangaroo, and her son Roo are introduced later in the book, in the chapter entitled "In Which Kanga and Baby Roo Come to the Forest and Piglet has a Bath." The bouncy toy-tiger character of Tigger is not introduced until the sequel, The House at Pooh Corner.

Every chapter of the original book begins with "In Which".

The rights to A. A. Milne's Pooh books were left to four beneficiaries: his family, the Royal Literary Fund, Westminster School and the Garrick Club. After A. A. Milne's death in 1956, his widow sold her rights to the Pooh characters to Stephen Slesinger, whose widow sold the rights after Slesinger's death to the Walt Disney Company. In 2001, the other beneficiaries sold their interest in the estate to the Disney Corporation for $350m. Previously Disney had been paying twice-yearly royalties to these beneficiaries. The estate of E. H. Shepard also received a sum in the deal.

Christopher Robin died in 1996. He had only one child - a daughter named Clare, who was diagnosed with severe cerebral palsy. He had sold shares in the future royalties he inherited from the Pooh books to the Royal Literary Fund (which already had a share) and, with the capital, set up a trust fund for her.

In 2002, Disney was embroiled in litigation over claims that it had systematically underpaid royalties due, and Clare Milne sought to terminate earlier agreements. In 2006 the U.S. Supreme Court declined to grant a writ of certiorari.

Clare died from natural causes due to a heart abnormality on October 27, 2012, at the age of 56. She had set up her own trust fund in 2002. The Clare Milne Trust offers grants of between £1,000 and £25,000 for disability projects.

Clare’s mother Lesley, the president of the trust, said: “We celebrate a remarkable person – a person who bubbled with humour and enjoyed life to the full... My dream is to know that my girl will be remembered for something that brings happiness where it is most needed.”
proudmommy690
by Platinum Member on Nov. 25, 2014 at 11:17 AM
Are you freaking kidding me?????? That's just ridiculous!
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